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I own the 2014 Range Rover SC Full Size. I have new 22" rims and need tires. I live in Colorado and drive through the mountains often. The guy at the tire shop was pushing the Yokahama Parada Spec X all season. He said I should have siping done to them. I asked him about Perelli Scorpion Winter 275/40/22 and he said he didn't recommend them because of the load rating and because he thought the Yokahama Prada Spec X sipined were better all around. Any thought?

I have the Prada spec-X and they suck balls in the snow. They rock when the roads are dry or wet but put an inch or two of snow on the road and they can't hold. I think the car is just too heavy for that tread pattern. A more V shaped tread pattern would help IMHO.
 

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Done.... the wife and I bought snow tires a few weeks ago after a VERY harsh Canadian winter. This winter we really want to be prepared and both bought Bridgestone Blizzaks DMVs. Great reviews and the only complaint is that they are a little to soft so they wear fast. I don't mind.... Accidents are way more expensive.
 

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Blizzaks are good tire. They are soft but noisy. Bridgestone is good enough on ice like Michelin. But on soft snow and deep snow they are useless.

Blizzak dmv is good for little 4x4 like Subaru,Honda crv, Lexus RX.
 

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The real question is if I'm going to get some snow here in the Pacific Northwest... this is BS!?!?!?!? :) Its been a few years since a nice snow storm...
 

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The real question is if I'm going to get some snow here in the Pacific Northwest... this is BS!?!?!?!? :) Its been a few years since a nice snow storm...
Serb,

I've driven 4+ hours in whiteout conditions before. Trust me, after that drive there was nothing *nice* about a snow storm lol.
 

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Fun, albeit ancient thread. As has been pounded through on this thread, my experience is tires trump all else for mild snow driving. After living in Germany for a few years, driving in the Alps, going to grad school in Colorado, and growing up in Ohio, I love driving in the snow and think it's a hoot. Sadly, when there is no one around, I do drive in a rather juvenile fashion- donuts and all.

In any event, while in Germany, we had a second set of wheels for my wife's 325xi with full on snow tires and basically had so much grip, we basically drove almost like it was dry. Now, if you have a lot of experience driving in these conditions, things like stopping distance and cornering speeds are second nature to be mostly different. Honestly, it got boring and I'd start to turn off the traction control and do some fun rally style drifts.

But the point is, to do it correctly, just get a second set of wheels with proper tires- as I have learned in many years of dual sport motorcycling, there is no "do it all" tire, and running snow tires for anything other than those conditions will have them worn out almost immediately.
 

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Fun, albeit ancient thread. As has been pounded through on this thread, my experience is tires trump all else for mild snow driving. After living in Germany for a few years, driving in the Alps, going to grad school in Colorado, and growing up in Ohio, I love driving in the snow and think it's a hoot. Sadly, when there is no one around, I do drive in a rather juvenile fashion- donuts and all.

In any event, while in Germany, we had a second set of wheels for my wife's 325xi with full on snow tires and basically had so much grip, we basically drove almost like it was dry. Now, if you have a lot of experience driving in these conditions, things like stopping distance and cornering speeds are second nature to be mostly different. Honestly, it got boring and I'd start to turn off the traction control and do some fun rally style drifts.

But the point is, to do it correctly, just get a second set of wheels with proper tires- as I have learned in many years of dual sport motorcycling, there is no "do it all" tire, and running snow tires for anything other than those conditions will have them worn out almost immediately.


Could not have said it better. Winter driving in Eastern Ontario is quite similar less the mountains but Europe I feel has an edge on it's drivers. I'm pretty sure that in Germany the requirements to get your license are far stricter than in NA. Even in Finland part of your driving test involves performing a textbook power slide.

BTW, I'm sure this thread gets resurrected all the time but I'll be it happens most often once winter hits most of us... Around December/January
 
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