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Driving in snow is very different. You have to look at the type of snow and the temp of the road. A good indicator is if the snow is blowing across the road (right on top of it) means its very cold and the road is frozend but if the snow seems to dissolve the road is warm and should be ok. When the road is cold driving is much more difficult. Best to stay on the fresh powder for traction staying out of ruts. Be sure to always watch for "black ice" The most common problem is you get over confident and it is too late to realize you cant stop.
 

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yrbender said:
Driving in snow is very different. You have to look at the type of snow and the temp of the road. A good indicator is if the snow is blowing across the road (right on top of it) means its very cold and the road is frozend but if the snow seems to dissolve the road is warm and should be ok. When the road is cold driving is much more difficult. Best to stay on the fresh powder for traction staying out of ruts. Be sure to always watch for "black ice" The most common problem is you get over confident and it is too late to realize you cant stop.
Or move to Florida. :wink:

That interesting, never heard of black ice?

Leo
 

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Black ice is just plain nasty....you can't see it on the road because it just looks wet and generally the entire road looks the same. It's an interesting experience when your driving along on a wet road and suddenly your back end wants to trade places with your front end, many a ditch gets visited because of the black ice.
Generally the conditions appear when snow has fallen, traffic melts the snow on the road but the temperature and wind are cold enough to freeze the melted snow on the road.
We see numerous snowfalls every year, some only a couple of inches, some a few feet. Temperatures can dip down to the minus 35 celcius mark with windchills on top of that making it feel like minus 45 celcius (by the way, minus 35 celcius is minus 30 fahrenheit)

If the dealer here sold the RRS with tires unacceptable for our conditions they would be in big trouble, both legally and from a customer perspective. I've never used winter tires, only chains when necessary in the mountains. For everything else the all season M+S have been fine.
 

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jacksun said:
If the dealer here sold the RRS with tires unacceptable for our conditions they would be in big trouble, both legally and from a customer perspective. I've never used winter tires, only chains when necessary in the mountains. For everything else the all season M+S have been fine.
The OP was looking for info on driving his S/C through snow because they don't come with M+S tires. I have driven mine in 6" snow and it does okay at best. Turning and braking are when you feel the limitations of the tires and quite honestly, I wouldn't want to drive my S/C in any mountains as it is now. Your HSE has decent all season tires... If what you're saying is true, what tires come on an S/C out there in Canada?
 

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Stock tires in Canada are....

HSE - 255/50R19 Continental CrossContact UHP 107Y
S/C - 275/40R20 Continental 4x4 SportContact 106Y
 

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I just called my dealer today to get some snow tire put on and he said it wasnt worth the money and it would run the same on slicks. I find that a little odd. I have all season tires and have driven through blizzards when the roads have been closed without any trouble but I would feel safer with snow tires. I only have 17k easy miles on my current tires. Now I'm just more confused.
 

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jacksun said:
Stock tires in Canada are....

HSE - 255/50R19 Continental CrossContact UHP 107Y
S/C - 275/40R20 Continental 4x4 SportContact 106Y
Thats what we get here too. Based on your previous message, I thought you guys might get all season tires on S/C's. 4X4 sportcontacts aren't M+S
 

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winter driving, ontario

I know everyone says Winter Tires are best, and they probably are, but the stock RR all seasons seem to be pretty good so far for me.

I have a FFRR SC 2007 and I was driving last week through our first storm of the season there was about 4 inches of snow, very limited visability, slush and black ice. Where I am in Aurora/King City there are a lot of hills, and often you would see cars slide off into the ditch or cars trying to go up the hill and not be able to make it and slide back down.

I can say as a new RR owner with stock wheels, I was very impressed with the RR, I set the TC to Snow and I was able to go up the hills without slipping and the going down the hills the antilock brakes worked perfect, I had control of the RR and no slippage on corners and was able to maintain good speed 40 to 60 km/h

Alot has to do with the cars also, my wife had a VW new beetle with stock all seasons and this thing would slide around and get stuck all the time, it was a death trap in winter, we sold it and now she has a 2007 bmw 328xi again with stock all seasons, however the bmw has all wheel drive, she says she can't belive the difference driving in the ice and snow, she says she can feel the wheels grip and bite into the snow.

So while true winter tires are best, I think the kind of car you are driving plays a big part.

Of course driving in the snow with low profile summer racing tires is a bad bad idea.

I am looking forward to when we have more snow and going for a drive :)

Duane
 

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Here in Canada there are so many ways to drive in the snow and it changes from one block to another. You could be on bare pavement one minute, turn a corner and then be on 2 inches of snow so adaptability is key. One thing that I usually do when there's snow on the roads is do a test slide once I leave the driveway just to see how far I'll skid to a stop.

Best tips are:
- drive pre-emptively, look well ahead and try to read traffic so you know what's going on.
- don't brake prematurely in heavy traffic. Remember there are drivers behind you.
- on the highway in heavy snow, ease off the gas when changing lanes and allow the car to coast into the next lane. Abrupt moves when switching from one "snow lane" to another can cause you to spin out. Those who have been there know what I mean.
- If skidding towards a car, try to steer behind it if possible. Cars that see you coming will most likely drive forward than in reverse.
- if you're a nervous driver or not comfortable behind the wheel, try to avoid driving in those conditions.
- Don't wear heavy coats and thick jackets when driving as this will restrict your movements. You should ALWAYS be able to make shoulder checks!
 

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As good as the 4wd and TC systems in these cars are, they can only provide as much traction as the tires are capable of giving. That said, I would personally prefer a +07my SC over most HSEs, as they were fitted with locking rear diffs, which do help a great deal.

If snow is something you see more than a couple times a year, and more than a couple inches each time, and driving through it is a must, I would absolutely recommend a set of snow tires. If nothing else, they will extend the life of your other tires, and obviously give you better traction in dicey situations. Even all-season tires are not rated for extreme cold, and don't get me started on the stock Michelin Latitude Diamaris - that was a bad idea by LR.
 

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the important thing is start the engine.
good oil, clean spark plugs, good gas, fully charged good battery.

if you start the engine than you have to buy a good snow tires. i have too much experiences on snow and ice. i can drive my car in hard winter conditions without snow tires, but i always buy good tires in winter.

advices
1. look ahead and focus everytime
2. be careful in snow lanes dont try steering if the car is in deep snow lane
3. never brake harder, if its necessary select low gears the braking.
4. use the accelerator pedal very carefuly
5. if you dont have experience on snow, try your car in safety place. braking, gas pedal, accelerating...
 

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I 100% agree on getting a set of Winter Rated Tires. I have a 2011 Sport HSE Luxury with 20". My first year purchasing it, we had ice and snow on the roads in NYC, I've never felt so unsafe before. Here i am thinking that i just bought a Range Rover and i'm invincible. Wrong, the Stock Michelin Diamaris are absolute crap, my truck slid down a street and i was only doing 15 MPH. This winter, i purchased a set of Nokian Happaletti R2 SUV. I now feel safe, i purposely drove hard on ice and snow and it held up, keep in mind every vehicle will slip and slide, but Snow tires are a must if you live in an area where you get hard winters.
 

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I encounter situations similar to those described by OP, wherein the snow on some roads are plowed completely (such as highways or main roads) and some are not. What is the recommended way to change traction control when going from one type of road surface to another? Can it be done safely while the vehicle is moving? I always slow down to a near stop or full stop before changing the program on the center console. It would be nice to know the proper way this should be done. By the way, the improved handling on snow using the snow program is quite significant, and I strongly recommend using it.
 

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Unless you are also wanting to engage low range at the same time, you should be able to switch Terrain Response programs on-the-fly, really no need to slow down. The system is smart enough to gradually "ease you" into the new program if if detects your speed or your gears are too high (or, it will prevent you from selecting that program altogether, such as if you were trying to accidentally switch to Rock Crawl or engage HDC while speeding down the highway at 70 mph, for example.)
 

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Zombie thread! I'll chime in for off road, deep snow driving (chains or no chains). I like to use the Mud & Ruts setting, turn TC off, and keep a good foot on the throttle. If you keep TC on it will slow you to a crawl and you'll either be heading in a direction you don't want or just come to a stop and get stuck.
 

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I own the 2014 Range Rover SC Full Size. I have new 22" rims and need tires. I live in Colorado and drive through the mountains often. The guy at the tire shop was pushing the Yokahama Parada Spec X all season. He said I should have siping done to them. I asked him about Perelli Scorpion Winter 275/40/22 and he said he didn't recommend them because of the load rating and because he thought the Yokahama Prada Spec X sipined were better all around. Any thought?
 

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the best winter tire is Nokian. if you cant find nokian you may buy michelin. Pirelli, made in italy??? italy and snow?

if the deal is winter tire buy it from cold country. Finland, Russia, sweden
 

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Zombie thread! I'll chime in for off road, deep snow driving (chains or no chains). I like to use the Mud & Ruts setting, turn TC off, and keep a good foot on the throttle. If you keep TC on it will slow you to a crawl and you'll either be heading in a direction you don't want or just come to a stop and get stuck.
You cannot turn Traction Control off - I assume you mean DSC (Stability Control) which is not TC.
 
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