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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All.

After a faulty relay burned down my 1996 RR's engine bay into a complete total loss, I bought a new RR – A 2000 Autobiography addition that looks quite nice.
I managed to salvage some of the mods I made from the burned RR but because the Autobiography looks so good, I decided to try and keep its look as original as I can and in the future I will post some pics of some modifications for the now RR.

The first mod and, for my opinion, the most relevant/interesting is a new air compressor.

In my "old" RR, I have fabricated an electric engine driven A/C compressor.

[attachment=3:1u39t7ae]DSC02189.jpg[/attachment:1u39t7ae]

[attachment=4:1u39t7ae]DSC02190.jpg[/attachment:1u39t7ae]

The reason I choose to run the A/C compressor with an electric motor was because there wasn't enough room in the engine bay for a belt driven compressor.

Things are different in the Bosch engine RR – if you look, you can find room...

To make a long story short, I made a bracket for an A/C compressor and install one right next to the power steering pump.
The power steering pump pulley run the compressor's pulley, via another pulley I attached to steering pump, using a short V belt.
The pics are of the build and testing stage:

[attachment=2:1u39t7ae]DSC05201.JPG[/attachment:1u39t7ae]

[attachment=1:1u39t7ae]DSC05221.JPG[/attachment:1u39t7ae]

[attachment=0:1u39t7ae]DSC05204.JPG[/attachment:1u39t7ae]

The system is operational now and works just great.
The air output is enormous.
On 1500-2000 RPM I can run air tools without an air tank and it can run all day, as long as the RR's engine is running and it can overcame (almost) any air leeks in the air system.
Although the "old" electric driven compressor served me well without overheating, with the engine driven compressor there is no electric motor and solenoids to worry about, when operating for a long period of time.
I would say that this is a nice solution for any air compressor problem for the P38.

Bernard.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
And another one - front view:

[attachment=0:3thdp4ru]DSC05208.JPG[/attachment:3thdp4ru]

Again, the pics are from the build time.
I'll try to post some current pics of the all system.
In general, there are 2 separate air systems.
1. The same red air tank as in the "old RR" system. It runs at 120-160 psi.
2. The original EAS. The original tank (110-140psi) is filled by the red tank via solenoid that gets its signal from the original compressor loom, using the original
pipe.
That way, the air runs in its original root, including the air drier...
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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The off road crowd has been doing that for a long time... but it's the first time I've seen it on a P38. Nice work.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
kmagnuss said:
The off road crowd has been doing that for a long time... but it's the first time I've seen it on a P38. Nice work.
Correct.
My intention was not trying to invent the wheel all over again.

As I wrote on the other post, I had an on board air compressor in my Wrangler YJ, before the 1996 RR, but couldn't find room to install one in that RR. That is way I made the winch driven compressor.
Now, with the 2000 RR, it is possible to install a powerful A/C air compressor in the engine bay.
That is the impotent thing - to have the option that other off road vehicles have.

BTW.
where did the pics in the old post go?
 

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do you have an oiler and drier inline with that compressor? I know that most people use york reciprocating compressors for these applications because the rotary sadens rely on the refridgerant to lubricate the parts. I have an old york 209 that i want to put in my gems but it jsut doesnt have the room. I use the truck for offroading only so i may just remove the original ac compressor and refit the york monster.
 

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bjohnston115 said:
do you have an oiler and drier inline with that compressor? No. I do not use an oiler. I plugged the oil passage to the compressor's pistons (inside the compressor) and that reduces the amount of oil passes thru the outlet port to an absolute minimum - I so the procedure in a Jeep forum some where. I'll try to look it up and post a link. In addition, I use 3 oil/water separators. One before the air goes into the red air tank and two after the tank, on the way to the original valve block and air tank. . I know that most people use york reciprocating compressors for these applications because the rotary sadens rely on the refridgerant to lubricate the parts. I have 2 yorks. Great air compressor but to tall to install in the RR. Again, the room issue. I have an old york 209 that i want to put in my gems but it jsut doesnt have the room. In the GEMS RR there isn't enough room for any engine driven air compressor. I use the truck for offroading only so i may just remove the original ac compressor and refit the york monster. Removing the original compressor will not solve the room issue for the GEMS's RR, regarding engine driven compressors - you just can't align it with any drive pulley - that is way I attached a winch motor to an A/C compressor in my old GEMS RR.
I will post some more pics later on.
 
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