RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My truck is heating up. Here is what I have done so far. Checked thermostat - took it out - put it in the hot water it works fine, changed the spark plugs, the old ones looked normal they had normal wear, replaced the cap on the expansion tank, the oil looks fine, I use synthetic oil, there are no obvious leaks, there is no loss of coolant. I flushed the radiator.
It started with heater input hose blowing up, replaced that then the heater out hose blew up, replaced that, now the top radiator hose has blown, I used the scanner no codes came up. Last time I worked fine for half hour, it was running smooth, and then it felt like the engine was getting some load and it started to heat up.
When it was idling, every so often I would hear a sound like something is starting towards the front.
Any ideas? I am thinking about replacing the belt and viscous fan clutch next.
Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
4,635 Posts
Maybe time to replace the radiator? They are a common failing within the system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
The radiator was replaced about four years ago, I looked at it it looks clean, but I will probably bring it to the radiator shop or is there a way to check for the clogged or damaged radiator?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I did run it with cap off, high idle at about 2000rpm for about ten minutes, occasionally squeezing the top hose and then I topped it off. What would be the best way to burp it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the link and your answers
You think I should get the radiator checked first and then do the other things if it does not fix the problem?
 

·
Premium Member
2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
4,635 Posts
The radiators are notoriously bad. As you've replaced one, you could find that the radiator you have is satisfactory. As they won't break the bank in terms of cost, maybe consider replacement anyway. 4 or 5 years is enough time for it to clog up internally and put pressure on the pump and hoses. The other weak point is the pump itself.

Saying that, from the original description, common sense says that the whole systems needs checking carefully. If the hoses are breaking as you describe, and you feel the engine itself isn't pressurising, then I'd be tempted to replace the entire system after performing a pressure test of the cooling system. Saying that, the pressure test could reveal a specific weak point.

You could ask the dealership to pressure test it for you, or buy a kit. Once you've confirmed the kit fits the p38, you could always sell it via ebay if you didn't want to keep hold of it.

Is the coolant correct. Has clean (demineralised) water been used to mix in with the correct coolant? Is your's the Bosch Thor engine or the earlier GEMS?
 

·
Premium Member
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
3,622 Posts
I think you should start with the cheap/easy first, and work up from there.

That being said, it took me about two weeks to properly burp mine after the return hose broke...and a week to do it after the throttle body heater was replaced. Good times.

I kept a set of tools with me (always do) and whenever it started to heat up I would shut it off, fill up the bottle if low, and open up the top hose and fill it up and clamp it back down. Be careful when opening up the bottle and the hose of course. Then I'd let it run for a few minutes to see if it would spike back up, and it usually wouldn't do it again for a few days. Now...all is well, but the leaking o-rings. Time for some more Bar's leak stop. :dance: See if I can get another two years without tearing apart the dash for that job.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top