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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Got a bit of a head-scratcher on my hands! The other morning I was driving my Rangie and she cut out when the idle dropped too low (as she often does); no problem, stopped, put her into park and re-started the engine, but now I can't get her out of park. Figured out the brake light weren't coming on, checked the 15A fuse - ok, so jumped the two green wires to get the brake lights to come on constantly so I could at least get her out of park and limp home.

Got a pattern replacement switch from Autozone and plugged it in to the connector, brake lights come on and selector comes out of park, but turns out the little probe sticking out of the switch is too short. I opened the original switch to see what's going on inside, and found that one of the contact breaker terminals (in the brake light circuit I believe) appeared corroded or burned. I cleaned the terminal and re-assembled an re-fitted the original switch, brake lights come on when pedal is depressed and gear selector comes out of park. "Job's a good-un" I thought, but that's when the fun started!!!

I drove the Rangie to work but noticed she felt a little more sluggish than usual, pulled over and noticed all 4 hubs were hot. I let everything cool down and then picked up the front wheels just to see if the brakes were binding, both front wheels turned freely (as far as they could in park anyway). Started the engine and put her in neutral, both front wheels now difficult to turn by hand but not impossible, definitely accounts for the hot hubs and sluggishness.

I decided to try and limp the Rangie home, brakes were binding again, so I pulled over and pulled the plug off the brakelight switch an jumped the two green wires so I could get her out of park, put her in neutral and then pulled the jumper wire (paperclip!) out of the plug and I noticed that the paperclip was hot, which tallies with the burnt terminal I noticed inside the switch earlier. This made no difference to the brakes binding, hubs were hot again by the time I got home.

What is going on here folks?! Not sure where to go next with this and the braking system on these late model Classics looks blummin' terrifying to me!! What could have happened where the car was driving great one minute and then all of a sudden it's constantly applying light braking? Brakes operate normally otherwise.

Cheers,
Chris
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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247 Posts
You could have two separate issues –

The switch may not be installed/adjusted properly and applying slight pressure to the pedal creating the brake drag

Secondly, the switch repair could be faulty causing he lamp illumination issue
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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39 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Does the switch at the pedal play any role in actuating the power-assist or ABS systems?

The other thing I noticed before this problem manifested itself is that when I started the truck and pulled off, particularly first thing in the morning, for the first minute or so something in the braking system would audibly pulse, you could feel it pulsing through the brake pedal when you applied the brake and the braking performance would be affected. I always imagined it to sound/feel like air bubbles being forced through the solenoid valves, but bleeding the brakes didn't make any difference. I wonder if the problems are connected?
 

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Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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247 Posts
Does the switch at the pedal play any role in actuating the power-assist or ABS systems?

The other thing I noticed before this problem manifested itself is that when I started the truck and pulled off, particularly first thing in the morning, for the first minute or so something in the braking system would audibly pulse, you could feel it pulsing through the brake pedal when you applied the brake and the braking performance would be affected. I always imagined it to sound/feel like air bubbles being forced through the solenoid valves, but bleeding the brakes didn't make any difference. I wonder if the problems are connected?
Checking - however, I don't think they communicate.

From RAVE:

70 BRAKES
10 REPAIR
STOP LIGHT SWITCH
Service repair no - 86.65.51

Remove
1. Turn ignition off and disconnect battery negative
lead.

2. Remove lower fascia panel.

3. Disconnect multi-plug to switch.

4. Depressurise system. See Depressurise
System

5. Depress brake pedal, pull WHITE sleeve and
BLACK plunger of switch FULLY forward.

6. Release switch retaining clips.
NOTE: If clips are difficult to release,
check WHITE sleeve is FULLY forward.

7. Remove switch.
Refit

8. Pull WHITE sleeve AND BLACK plunger of
switch fully forward.

9. Depress brake pedal, fit switch. Ensure retaining
clips are FULLY located.

10. Hold switch firmly in place, pull brake pedal back
fully to set switch.

11. Turn ignition on. Wait for ABS pump to shut off.

12. Check switch adjustment by slowly depressing
brake pedal and checking that the switch clicks
at least once before booster hisses.

13. If incorrect, adjust switch by depressing brake
pedal and pushing black plug in one detent at a
time.

14. Check that stop lamps go off when pedal is
released. If not, depress pedal and pull black
plunger out one detent at a time.



DEPRESSURISE SYSTEM

WARNING: Before bleeding the system or

working on any component in the brake
system the following procedure MUST be
carried out to depressurise the accumulator.

1. Switch off ignition.

2. Operate the brake pedal 30 times. Pedal travel
will increase slightly and reduced resistance will
be felt as pressure decreases.

3. Wait for 60 seconds, press the brake pedal four
more times. This procedure will ensure that all
pressure is evacuated from the system.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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39 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The switch may not be installed/adjusted properly and applying slight pressure to the pedal creating the brake drag
Lockettc, you sir, are a genius!! That's exactly what the problem was! Held the switch body and pulled the brake pedal back firmly and it clicked back about a quarter of an inch. I would never have guessed such a small pedal movement would be enough to apply that much braking force. Breathing a heavy sigh of relief, thank you!
 
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