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Can any one tell me what the numerous brass fittings are on the AC line that connects from the accumulator/drier to the evaporator under the dash, what is the function of this. These fittings/parts are now obsolete. I wonder if I can do away with them and just make a new AC line that omits them? I think it is a multi (2) valve(s) for servicing the Accumulator with out losing Freon from the evaporator. Any one run across this. My hose has a leak, but I cant replace the hose with out the parts that are no longer available..
 

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I ditched all of the old lines and had an AC shop remake them without the old fittings. I spent less than $100 on all of it and my system has been ice cold for two years now.
 

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Okay I found out that the group of fiitings on the a/c is a type of service valve. if you separate the lines no refrigerant will leak out. they can be omitted along with the king valves mounted on the back of the compressor. that does away with like 6 o-rings(potential leaks)
 

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Good to know. My AC guy had no idea what the group of fittings were and what they did. I didn't either. I kept the king valves on the compressor in my 91 and had new lines made. I have an 89 I am working on that needs the AC done. I am going to ditch the valves for that one based on what you found out. One is leaking.
 

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I ditched all of the old lines and had an AC shop remake them without the old fittings. I spent less than $100 on all of it and my system has been ice cold for two years now.
This is AWESOME info, I’m trying to resurrect the AC in my ’93LWB that has been non-operational for over 10 yrs because the compressor seized.
Is there a diagram from a manual you can point to todescribe the lines you omitted? Are they accessible from the engine bay, or doI have to dis-assemble the dash?
 

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I don't have a diagram other than what is in the repair manual. This job is similar to replacing the heater core and you can use the instructions that Atlantic British has posted on their repair site to dismantle the dash. If you remove the lines and take them to an AC shop, they will know what to do. My lines had cracks in the rubber so I replaced all of them.

Since my system was out of freon already, I did the following:
1) Remove AC lines from compressor, receiver/dryer and line retaining plate on the fire wall.
2) Remove dash and entire housing that holds the AC condenser and blower motors. You will need to take this out of the truck for disassembly. Gently pull the AC lines through the firewall when doing this.
3) Disassemble the AC condenser housing so you can get at the lines attached to it. You will need to unwrap a lot of cork tape from the fittings and the expansion valve to remove them. Clean the entire condenser, housing and blower fans while you are in there.
4) Remove all of the lines and take them to an AC shop and have them remade. Buy some new cork tape and AC system flush while you are there. The condenser, expansion valve and evaporator will have build up and old AC oil in them that needs to be cleaned out.
5) Flush out the condenser, expansion valve and evaporator. I did this by pouring the AC flush into each part separately, letting it sit and then using compressed air to blow the gunk out. You will have to do this a few times until clean fluid comes out. Let it all dry.
6) Attach new condenser lines, wrap the expansion valve and condenser fittings in new cork tape. Reassemble everything and reinstall the dash.
7) You will need to replace your receiver/dryer. Wait until last to do this. Connect your hoses to your compressor and then install the new receiver/dryer. It is very moisture sensitive so once you open it, you have about 15 minutes to get the lines connected before you can damage it.
8) Now your system is sealed up and you can take it to an AC shop for charging or if you have the equipment, put a vacuum pump on it for a half hour to remove the air and verify you have no leaks. Charge the system with new freon and oil.
9) Enjoy AC again
 
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