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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy - wanted to post this issue and see if any of you fine people can comment or suggest what's going on. Once in a while, I'll insert the key into the ignition and it is just absolutely locked up - no movement at all. Each time this has happened in the past, I've monkeyed with it and jiggled the key around until it eventually unlocks and turns to Start - usually less than 3 or 4 mins of this and I'm back in business. Yesterday was the worst episode of this issue ever - took me over 15 mins and many, many expletives to get it to finally turn. Just about called my wife for a pick-up.

I'm looking for feedback from folks who've experienced this, diagnosed the cause and fixed the problem.

Questions to spur some thought:

1. Do RR keys wear down to the point that they don't work in the switch?
2. Do the internal parts of the ignition switch itself wear out or break and cause this issue?
3. Is the switch serviceable/can it be remanufactured? Can I take it out, clean it, lube it, or anything like that to get some more life out of it?
4. If it's a matter of replacing the ignition switch with either an OEM part or aftermarket part - does anyone have a recommendation as to where to purchase?
5. Has anyone installed a push-button start assembly in a RRC? If so, share details of that.


Thanks!

SMD
 

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Keys do indeed wear down from years of tumbler pins rubbing against them. Likewise the key way wears over the years. These are both mechanical issues with tumblers and keyway. Unless you are having electrical issues there would be nothing wrong with the actual ignition switch. When I've had this issue I purchased a new key way with keys and had an automotive locksmith create a new key in the old shape. This maintains the same door locks The the locksmith can change the tumbler pins in the new key way to match the rig's original key pattern. This gives a new original key and fresh key way. The other alternative is to just use the new key way and keys. This means carrying multiple keys.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover Classic
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1,413 Posts
you could retrofit the complete ignition switch out of a discovery 2 if need be. I have read that early classic ignition switch is NLA. I may be wrong.
some guys have performed the conversion you inquired upon. it is simple if you're good with vehicle electrical systems. furthermore, a few of these guys have gone from race car style conversion to intricate hidden switches.
best of luck
 

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Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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139 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Roger that - appreciate the feedback.


Keys do indeed wear down from years of tumbler pins rubbing against them. Likewise the key way wears over the years. These are both mechanical issues with tumblers and keyway. Unless you are having electrical issues there would be nothing wrong with the actual ignition switch. When I've had this issue I purchased a new key way with keys and had an automotive locksmith create a new key in the old shape. This maintains the same door locks The the locksmith can change the tumbler pins in the new key way to match the rig's original key pattern. This gives a new original key and fresh key way. The other alternative is to just use the new key way and keys. This means carrying multiple keys.
 

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Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
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139 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for chiming in.........I really like the idea of a push-button ignition....and I've seen some of the "race car style" units you refer to on Ebay and various other automotive sites.

Also: I found an ignition switch on Flea-Bay and the seller *says* its a OEM/Lucas part........$73:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/LAND-ROVER-STEERING-LOCK-COLUMN-IGNITION-SWITCH-DISCOVERY-I-M-T-STC1435-LUCAS/172831190368?var=null

Like RRToadHall said, if I go that route, I have multiple keys - which doesn't bother me all that much I guess.

Appreciate the feedback guys.

SMD

you could retrofit the complete ignition switch out of a discovery 2 if need be. I have read that early classic ignition switch is NLA. I may be wrong.
some guys have performed the conversion you inquired upon. it is simple if you're good with vehicle electrical systems. furthermore, a few of these guys have gone from race car style conversion to intricate hidden switches.
best of luck
 

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Registered
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368 Posts
Howdy - wanted to post this issue and see if any of you fine people can comment or suggest what's going on. Once in a while, I'll insert the key into the ignition and it is just absolutely locked up - no movement at all. Each time this has happened in the past, I've monkeyed with it and jiggled the key around until it eventually unlocks and turns to Start - usually less than 3 or 4 mins of this and I'm back in business. Yesterday was the worst episode of this issue ever - took me over 15 mins and many, many expletives to get it to finally turn. Just about called my wife for a pick-up.

I'm looking for feedback from folks who've experienced this, diagnosed the cause and fixed the problem.

Questions to spur some thought:

1. Do RR keys wear down to the point that they don't work in the switch?
2. Do the internal parts of the ignition switch itself wear out or break and cause this issue?
3. Is the switch serviceable/can it be remanufactured? Can I take it out, clean it, lube it, or anything like that to get some more life out of it?
4. If it's a matter of replacing the ignition switch with either an OEM part or aftermarket part - does anyone have a recommendation as to where to purchase?
5. Has anyone installed a push-button start assembly in a RRC? If so, share details of that.


Thanks!

SMD
Most people don't buy old cars because they fear they will leave them stranded. I have driven plenty of old and new cars and never got stranded (ok got stranded once). MOST issues on a car that could leave you stranded announce them self a few times before they become terminal. So keeping on top of smaller issues is how you avoid getting stuck with an old car. Checking for leaks is also highly recommended on any land rover vehicle.

The only time I did get stuck and had to call the tow truck was when my Land Rover Series 3 broke the clutch hydraulic line (on the M25 London orbital) and with only 4th gear I did not make it home and called the tow truck (free of charge with my insurance at the time). I had just changed the clutch and disturbed the metal hydraulic line enough to allow correct operation for a few days, but the it fractured and parted the pipe without warning.
 
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