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First, 33k mi on my '11 RR HSE. knocking wasn't bad sometimes, other times I could really hear it. no codes/CEL. planning to keep the truck a long time, so might as well deal with it now while the problem is relatively contained. I'll share some notes on the process when I'm done.

I'm trying to replace just the guides and tensioners. Seems there's no DIY for this... or point me to it? I've read the full proper procedure about fifty times now. I think I get it. I see how not taking the valve covers off does save a ton of time, assuming I can complete the job as-is.

I figure it's a good idea to put the motor in TDC position, so I could put the crank position sensor locking tool (and cam tools) in place if I needed to. That way if I did screw up the chain position, it's not a massive mess trying to rotate crank and cams separately. Ideally I'd like to figure a way to hold the cams in place, as they are, when I put the flywheel locking tool in place. So as long as they don't move with respect to each other, and the chain doesn't hop teeth, everything should be exactly the same as before the procedure -- except with less chain slap.

That said, does anyone have pix of how (best) to zip tie the chains in place, so you can then replace the guides/tensioners with a lot less risk of the chains skipping teeth?

Now that it's in front of my face, it's not like I envisioned it. There's basically no room between the tensioner blade and the sprocket, and you can't put the zip tie thru the chain (right???)

Pix are what it looks like, if anyone's interested -- motor not at TDC yet.

Thanks!
20181021_114111.jpg 20181021_114118.jpg
 

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You won’t be able to do it with out locking cams in place also you will need to lock everything in place and retention the chain while installing


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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Saving (maybe) an hour by leaving the valve covers in place at this point is a false economy if the timing slips at all while you're removing the front pulley, VVT's, chain and original guides and tensioners, then installing the new guides and tensioners and refitting the VVT's and the crank pulley.

Assuming you're trying to "save time" - how much extra time do you have if you have to do it a second time, correctly? :)

FWIW, one of the four guides is very fiddly to slide into place (you'll discover which one). This is why it only makes sense to know that the cams are locked in place. Any movement during that installation almost guarantees a mistake.

Don't pull the pins on the new tensioners unit you have the four new guides in place.

With four cams to lock, using the correct tool is a must if you want to "save" time in the long run, IMHO.

Rob
 
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