RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi, tried to find this on the forum to no avail. Roads being plowed after intense snow a couple weeks ago blocked cars parked on the street behind a 2 ft berm of packed snow. Nobody could get out without 4wd. My brother's Xterra crawled right through with no effort...no need to rock it back in reverse to start again with fresh momentum. I figured the RRS would have no problem. I raised the suspension and put it in "snow/grass/gravel" mode (didn't know at the time, but now I know...snow setting is not for this type of snow...WRONG setting). Couldn't get out. Makes me wish I had my old trusty 10k truck with standard mechanical 4x4.

1. Normal behavior? I couldn't force it to generate power to turn the wheels. I assume that was proper TR action for this mode. But the engine also died when I pushed the accelerator...3 times! Is that also the TR working? Did TR think a soccer mom was running off the road so it killed power on purpose? Or is this a problem I should get checked out? Never expected a rover engine to die in such mild conditions.

2. Best setting? After dying on me, I got the "TR not available" warning so it was just in regular drive mode. I was able to get out in that mode with lots of wheel spin and after reversing a few times to ram the berm. Would "muds/ruts" have been the best setting for these conditions? Or is "sand" basically the same but even better because it doesn't spaz out and try to brake when wheels spin?

3. Best to simulate 4x4? What's the best TR setting that simulates part time 4x4 like on cheaper trucks, i.e. Xterra? "Mud/ruts?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
what do you think your rrs has?

which tires are on your vehicle and how old are they?
tires are brand new A/S, not A/T. I know...they aren't ideal for snow/mud conditions. I know...A/T tires would've worked better here. that's not my question (not to mention if rover needs tire upgrade to get out of what a stock Outback gets out of, then life has no meaning). :D I'm asking 1) does TR cause engine to die, 2) which TR setting is best for this condition, 3) which best simulates the 4x4Hi setting on more basic part time 4x4 systems?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,467 Posts
Your vehicle has full time 4wd, with selectable high and low ranges(in the snow, you want high range)

That said, in a complete loss of traction situation, unless you have a locking rear differential, you may be left with power to only two wheels, one front, one rear.

The best TR program to be in when in snow, is Grass Gravel Snow. Terrain Response is solely an output, so it does nothing but change the way other systems react, be it throttle response, traction control intervention, or transmission shift points. I do not recommend being in high profile in the snow, aside from getting free of being high centered, it changes the wheel to ground angles, and in doing so can reduce maximum available traction on a spinning tire.

No, if the engine actually stalled, this is not normal, and should be looked into. If all power was cut, but it stayed running, then yes, this will happen due to DSC intervention, this can be somewhat reduced by disabling the DSC system with the switch.

A/S tires are far from all created equally. Some solely have an All Season rated rubber compound, some have that along with a decent tread pattern to cope with snow and other loose surfaces. Generally speaking though, A/T tires will be no better then A/S tires, as a lot of A/T tires are not rated for the temperatures that you would be seeing when a decent amount of snow is around.
 

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
627 Posts
For me I would have used snow and dsc off and maybe command shift starting in 2nd or 3rd if it would let you. If that was no good then select rock crawl, low range, dsc off, command shift and because you are in low range select the highest gear you can - 4th, 5th or 6th and go easy on the throttle. My logic is that in snow etc the centre diff is open until it feels something odd where in rock crawl everything is locked up and ready to go and the vehicle provides the greatest traction no matter the conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info! But this is why I might prefer a basic 4x4 truck where you just turn it on and muscle through obstacles. My experience is they deliver aggressive power to get you through stuff. The impression I get from both of your posts (let me know if I'm wrong) is, instead of aggressive power, the rover is designed for finesse to get through things with no wheel spin. Would you agree with that--aggressive power vs. finesse?

Seems finesse can only work if you know the computer algorithms behind the TR settings in order to optimize the machine, like knowing to put it in rock crawl even though it's in snow...I didn't know to use that setting but if it's the only one that locks for at least 2 wheel power, I get it. Why doesn't "mud" lock? Wouldn't that be desired?

I'm also confused because I read other posts that said the biggest mistake people make is thinking that the snow setting is for deep, mounded & rutted snow (the type I was in) because it's actually more like a typical 4x4 mud environment so you use the mud setting, whereas the snow setting is for regular driving on slippery road surfaces (not at all what I was doing). Is it correct that snow setting focuses on preventing wheel spin, not delivering power? So if you're in a tough spot where a little wheel spin would help, snow is not the right setting and mud would be better?

Ugh...sorry for all the questions...just trying to get my head around this system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
everything is locked up and ready to go and the vehicle provides the greatest traction no matter the conditions.
Why wouldn't you always want this setting then? This is why I like the more basic 4x4s. They "lock up and get you ready to go" when you push the button before you get into trouble, instead of waiting for the computer to detect trouble and hopefully react correctly. If I'm wrong please let me know...I'd much rather be happy with the rover instead of thinking I could've saved $40k and got a truck I'd like better because it would give me more user control instead of fighting a computer that doesn't understand the conditions and what I'm trying to do!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
531 Posts

·
SUPER MODERATOR
2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
1,966 Posts

·
Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
627 Posts
Err no - snow and ice means no grip - power means you go no where, finesse means you might. Plenty of power in any version of the RRS - far more than your basic 4wd truck and has the electronic smarts to put the power where it is needed - not digging holes and going nowhere. If you had power problems it is either a problem with your vehicle or you had DSC on.

Grass/Gravel/Snow - This program is for use on loose or slippery surfaces, but not deep soft materials such as deep sand or deep snow. Land Rover recommends using the Sand program for deep snow. The most common terrain surface that correspond to this setting are just as the name suggests: wet grass and snow-covered roads.

Mud/Ruts
- The Mud/Ruts program is for deeper mud, ruts, and uneven surfaces.


Sand -
This program is for soft, deep surfaces. Wet sand (such as on a beach) may require the Mud/Ruts setting. The Sand program is also the preferred program for snow that is deep enough for the tires to “sink in” when attempting to gain traction.

Rock Crawl setting is for use on solid surfaces when careful control is needed, whether wet or dry (large rocks, rocky river beds, etc.). Rock Crawl is available only when the vehicle is in Low range.



From the above - the sand setting would have been most appropriate for the situation you mentioned. It also suggests Mud Ruts as you have mentioned but my preference is Rock Crawl as the I find that gives me the best control. Everyone is different though and have their own preferences.

Maybe you need to buy this book and all the mystery will be explained http://www.greenovalexperience.com/#!product/prd2/1041448864/goe-offroad-companion-booklet

You have one of the most capable 4wds off the showroom floor all you need is to learn what it can do.

Garry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Maybe you need to buy this book and all the mystery will be explained http://www.greenovalexperience.com/#!product/prd2/1041448864/goe-offroad-companion-booklet

I checked out this link. Came across this description of what one learns in their seminars "Driving techniques and how your approach will differ from the 'conventional' 4WD"

That's exactly what I was trying to say at the beginning of the thread when I mentioned standard "4x4 trucks." I started this thread to see if somebody could help me understand how rover differs from "conventional 4WD" (not to understand the system...I already read up on it...but understand how to actually drive it in different situations) because I've driven a lot of "conventional 4WD" in the past and my experience getting bogged down a couple weeks ago made it real clear driving RRS is very different from driving a Wrangler or Xterra through the same stuff. Not saying it's bad. Just saying it's different and wanting to learn it. I think I'll do a course!

Thanks everybody.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Rover has off road driving schools in different places and next month an owners event in lots of places on the east coast. They have 100 mile off road coarse with instructors who go over how to use rovers system in detail. Also offer one hour two hour and all day training using their vehicle. We are going to the owners event and hopefully will learn something. Off reading has always been a passion either jeeps, 4wd trucks or four wheelers ever since I turned 16 and now I'm 60 so no hope for me. The event we chose is in Asheville ,NC and hopefully will learn more about this system and maybe even some new tricks
 

·
SUPER MODERATOR
2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
1,966 Posts
Rover has off road driving schools in different places and next month an owners event in lots of places on the east coast. They have 100 mile off road coarse with instructors who go over how to use rovers system in detail. Also offer one hour two hour and all day training using their vehicle. We are going to the owners event and hopefully will learn something. Off reading has always been a passion either jeeps, 4wd trucks or four wheelers ever since I turned 16 and now I'm 60 so no hope for me. The event we chose is in Asheville ,NC and hopefully will learn more about this system and maybe even some new tricks
off roading is different from actual snow tracking. I guess the snow option is good for your usual snowy road. but the OP wants to know what to use if you bog down a really deep snow. like getting out of ditch for example. it is practical application of 4x4 not controlled LR tours.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
off roading is different from actual snow tracking. I guess the snow option is good for your usual snowy road. but the OP wants to know what to use if you bog down a really deep snow. like getting out of ditch for example. it is practical application of 4x4 not controlled LR tours.




Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App

Only offering suggestion not trying to offend anyone
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
It was likely not completely the TR to blame. The lower control arms combined with short tires don't have much for clearance in deep (non-fluffy or old hard/crusty) snow. It does not take a lot of this type of snow to give it a hard time.
 

·
SUPER MODERATOR
2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
1,966 Posts
Only offering suggestion not trying to offend anyone
no problems here. I just want LRUSA to offer 4x4 tours in the snow not just in the desert or east. maybe a ski tour + 4x4 trekking.
 

·
LIFETIME CONTRIBUTOR
Joined
·
1,382 Posts
I was told this long ago....

"A tool is only as good as the hand it's in"

We all drive one of the most capable suv's in the world. The problem is it does not have auto pilot. Similar to a pagani just because your vehicle is capable you still need to know how to use it. Blaming the tires or the traction control or the rover itself is just ridiculous. Just like blaming the hammer for bending the nail. You didn't hit it right, it wasn't the hammers fault.

If you have decent tires and some practice a rover will take you anywhere you want to go without problem.
 

·
Premium Member
2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
Joined
·
5,175 Posts
off roading is different from actual snow tracking. I guess the snow option is good for your usual snowy road. but the OP wants to know what to use if you bog down a really deep snow. like getting out of ditch for example. it is practical application of 4x4 not controlled LR tours.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
You amaze me with some of your comments. As Buppies mentioned you can learn a TON about how the RRS works in all conditions at the LR experience schools, and it was great advice. If you want to learn how it works in snow, you go to a school in the winter. I can only speak to the school in VT, but you hit every condition imaginable on their course.

If you can't attend a course, go out into a snowy field and practice playing with the different modes--with the understanding that the RRS is not a M1A1 tank. It will get stuck. So bring a shovel and a few boards when you play around. If you put it in the ditch, plan on calling a tow truck.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top