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I think we're all awaiting more information on that. Not sure if anything has been said about it yet.
 

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It's most likely an autopilot type system. Steers for you with adaptive cruise control for a limited amount of time.
 

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as said, we need more information from LR what this feature exactly does. I'm sure we'll find out in the next few weeks.
 

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Going to dealership today, I'll see if anyone knows. I'm sure they had to have had some training before people are able to order.
 

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The lane keep assist on my 2017 was awful....almost drove into a few things. I disabled it

Didn't order it for 2018...just adaptive cruise
 

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They've made things really confusing with the new Driver Assist package. Since it includes the surround cameras, but nothing else in the Vision Assist, I'm checking to see if the Vision Assist Package will be priced differently based on whether or not the DA package is ordered. Just sent in my order but don't have an actual date as to when orders will begin processing.

2019 Range Rover HSE TD6

Driver Assist Pack
Vision Assist Pack
All Terrain Progress Control
Terrain Response 2
20 Way Heated/Cooled Front Seats w/ Power recline Heated/Cooled Rear Seats
Four-Zone Climate Control
Heated Windshield
Meridian Surround Sound System
Wood and Leather Steering Wheel
Satin Straight Walnut Veneer
Illuminated Aluminum Treadplates w/ Range Rover script
Atlas Exterior Accents
Byron Blue Exterior
Navy/Ivory interior with Navy Seats
Deployable Side Steps
 

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OK, since JLR is now referring to the different driver aids by their "levels" I am going to assume that they are referring to the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) Standard J3016 Autonomy Levels.

The descriptions of these levels is as follows:
Level 1 (Drive and Park Packages)
("hands on"): The driver and the automated system share control of the vehicle. Examples are Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), where the driver controls steering and the automated system controls speed; and Parking Assistance, where steering is automated while speed is manual. The driver must be ready to retake full control at any time. Lane Keeping Assistance (LKA) Type II is a further example of level 1 self driving.

Level 2 (Drive Pro and Park Pro):
("hands off"): The automated system takes full control of the vehicle (accelerating, braking, and steering). The driver must monitor the driving and be prepared to intervene immediately at any time if the automated system fails to respond properly. The shorthand "hands off" is not meant to be taken literally. In fact, contact between hand and wheel is often mandatory during SAE 2 driving, to confirm that the driver is ready to intervene.

Level 3 (Drive Assist) NEW:
Level 3 ("eyes off"): The driver can safely turn their attention away from the driving tasks, e.g. the driver can text or watch a movie. The vehicle will handle situations that call for an immediate response, like emergency braking. The driver must still be prepared to intervene within some limited time, specified by the manufacturer, when called upon by the vehicle to do so. The 2018 Audi A8 Luxury Sedan was the first commercial car to claim to be capable of level 3 self driving. The car has a so-called Traffic Jam Pilot. When activated by the human driver, the car takes full control of all aspects of driving in slow-moving traffic at up to 60 kilometers per hour. The function works only on highways with a physical barrier separating one stream of traffic from oncoming traffic.

If this is what JLR means by "levels" then this is a big step. Level 3 is the first level where the vehicle is considered to be monitoring the environment and the driver is mainly responsible for taking over in a emergency situation. The human driver needs to be prepared to intervene, but is not required to always maintain control of the vehicle. If you have ever used land keep assist and play "pinball" by letting it bounce back and forth between the lines, you will know that the car will tell you to resume control and the system disables. This is because on a level two system, the driver is still responsible for monitoring the environment and must keep his or her hands on the controls at all times.

As far as I know, level 3 is the highest level of autonomy available on a production vehicle.
 

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Interesting. I have a 2018 ATB being delivered end of next month. If That's really what they mean by Level 3 I think I'll either ask for a big discount or re-order a 2019
 

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I was told not to get my hopes up too high regarding this. Said this is a baby step up from lane keep assist and that it will be nowhere close to autopilot, but he said it’s a start.
 

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I was told not to get my hopes up too high regarding this. Said this is a baby step up from lane keep assist and that it will be nowhere close to autopilot, but he said it’s a start.
I am guessing it is going to be like what our 7 series BMW had. You need to have a car in front of you for it to follow and it only works for about 30 seconds or so before you have to touch the steering wheel. Not anywhere as good as our tesla or volvo, but it was still nice to have.
 

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That's not what they mean. The new "Driver Assist Package" is essentially the Park Pro and Driver Pro along with the surround cameras. It's just different packaging. As far as the new wording for the ACC, I think it's just a description change. No "self driving".

OK, since JLR is now referring to the different driver aids by their "levels" I am going to assume that they are referring to the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) Standard J3016 Autonomy Levels.

The descriptions of these levels is as follows:
Level 1 (Drive and Park Packages)
("hands on"): The driver and the automated system share control of the vehicle. Examples are Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC), where the driver controls steering and the automated system controls speed; and Parking Assistance, where steering is automated while speed is manual. The driver must be ready to retake full control at any time. Lane Keeping Assistance (LKA) Type II is a further example of level 1 self driving.

Level 2 (Drive Pro and Park Pro):
("hands off"): The automated system takes full control of the vehicle (accelerating, braking, and steering). The driver must monitor the driving and be prepared to intervene immediately at any time if the automated system fails to respond properly. The shorthand "hands off" is not meant to be taken literally. In fact, contact between hand and wheel is often mandatory during SAE 2 driving, to confirm that the driver is ready to intervene.

Level 3 (Drive Assist) NEW:
Level 3 ("eyes off"): The driver can safely turn their attention away from the driving tasks, e.g. the driver can text or watch a movie. The vehicle will handle situations that call for an immediate response, like emergency braking. The driver must still be prepared to intervene within some limited time, specified by the manufacturer, when called upon by the vehicle to do so. The 2018 Audi A8 Luxury Sedan was the first commercial car to claim to be capable of level 3 self driving. The car has a so-called Traffic Jam Pilot. When activated by the human driver, the car takes full control of all aspects of driving in slow-moving traffic at up to 60 kilometers per hour. The function works only on highways with a physical barrier separating one stream of traffic from oncoming traffic.

If this is what JLR means by "levels" then this is a big step. Level 3 is the first level where the vehicle is considered to be monitoring the environment and the driver is mainly responsible for taking over in a emergency situation. The human driver needs to be prepared to intervene, but is not required to always maintain control of the vehicle. If you have ever used land keep assist and play "pinball" by letting it bounce back and forth between the lines, you will know that the car will tell you to resume control and the system disables. This is because on a level two system, the driver is still responsible for monitoring the environment and must keep his or her hands on the controls at all times.

As far as I know, level 3 is the highest level of autonomy available on a production vehicle.
 
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