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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Engine was making a wierd noise and local service said the rod bearing is/was going bad and there are metal flakes in the oil filter. I need a new engine. My car has 37k miles.

Anyone else have an issue like this on the diesels?I thought the diesels were pretty reliable over the standard V6 and V8 supercharged engines.
 

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2016 TD6 and 2018 SCV8 Range Rover Sports
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I have a 2016 TD6 with 50K miles and so far so good. That said, Land Rover has dropped the diesel past the 2021 model. Some say it's due to low sales others say engine problems.
I suggest you don't drive it anymore because right now it's repairable. Have it towed to a Land Rover dealer. You're probably still under warranty but if you're not it's way cheaper to replace the bearings than have the crank shaft break and trash the entire motor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have a 2016 TD6 with 50K miles and so far so good. That said, Land Rover has dropped the diesel past the 2021 model. Some say it's due to low sales others say engine problems.
I suggest you don't drive it anymore because right now it's repairable. Have it towed to a Land Rover dealer. You're probably still under warranty but if you're not it's way cheaper to replace the bearings than have the crank shaft break and trash the entire motor.
yeah I took my car in for regular service and my service manager noticed a noise and found out the issue. Land Rover approved the engine replacement so will wait until all the work is done.

it’s just odd I never noticed any issue with past diesels band quite frankly I love the engine I think sales played a big part of the discontinuation. Nevertheless I’ve had issue after issue with the tech and infotainment screens and other miscellaneous issues with these rovers I’m going to get rid of mine when I get it back
 

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Great! Sounds like you're covered!
I like my diesel too and am hoping to get over 150K miles out of it. Not sure how you would do trading it in but should do great as a private sale. My wife has a 2018 and had the infotainment issues but they're pretty well gone after multiple software updates.
 

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I’ve noticed that used range rovers in the market with the Diesel engines are comparatively selling for a lower price/ slower pace verses the V6 and V8 ones.
 

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I’ve noticed that used range rovers in the market with the Diesel engines are comparatively selling for a lower price/ slower pace verses the V6 and V8 ones.
It's true the majority of American drivers aren't familiar with modern diesel engines and others are scared off by the VW Audi diesel scandal or the smoke and clatter of diesels past. However, there are those that have driven, understand the advantages and prefer diesel power. When Audi dropped the Q7 diesel, demand for used ones shot up and supply dried up. I suspect very few people realize they cannot order a new diesel Range Rover and the number of used ones is now finite. When those that want diesel realize this, one with low mileage and a new engine looks pretty attractive to the RR diesel lover!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's true the majority of American drivers aren't familiar with modern diesel engines and others are scared off by the VW Audi diesel scandal or the smoke and clatter of diesels past. However, there are those that have driven, understand the advantages and prefer diesel power. When Audi dropped the Q7 diesel, demand for used ones shot up and supply dried up. I suspect very few people realize they cannot order a new diesel Range Rover and the number of used ones is now finite. When those that want diesel realize this, one with low mileage and a new engine looks pretty attractive to the RR diesel lover!
So you’re saying I should hold onto my car after the engine swap? With the way the used car market is right now everything is so expensive. Also Land Rover/Jaguar do not offer the CPO 7 year/100k warranty anymore only 1 year unlimited miles (same as Audi/Mercedes Benz). They got rid of it early summer and my car is under CPO until 2024/100k miles. I do love the diesel because of the better gas mileage. My wife’s Disco 5 eats up gas with the supercharged 6.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I’ve noticed that used range rovers in the market with the Diesel engines are comparatively selling for a lower price/ slower pace verses the V6 and V8 ones.
I was able to get my 18’ RRS loaded (HUD, Driver Assist, 3rd Rod, 4 Zone Climate) with only 27k miles and CPO for 62k. When I was looking in the market before buying my car was atleast 7 to 9k cheaper then the other 18’ RRS with the supercharged V6 or V8 with little to no options.
 

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So you’re saying I should hold onto my car after the engine swap? With the way the used car market is right now everything is so expensive. Also Land Rover/Jaguar do not offer the CPO 7 year/100k warranty anymore only 1 year unlimited miles (same as Audi/Mercedes Benz). They got rid of it early summer and my car is under CPO until 2024/100k miles. I do love the diesel because of the better gas mileage. My wife’s Disco 5 eats up gas with the supercharged 6.
No question such a major repair can shatter your confidence and trust in the vehicle so it's totally up to you. But would it be so bad? You still have warranty, all used cars have gone up in price so it's hard to know what you would find and at what price.
If you do keep it I would definitely change the oil more frequently than Land Rover recommends. There are also oil additives that add lubricity to help prevent bearing damage and fuel additives that keep injectors clean, add cetane (the diesel counterpart to octane) to off-set poor diesel fuel quality and lubricate the injector pump.
An oil analysis done just prior to doing the first oil change (I use Blackstone Laboratories, buy six at a time including the TBN analysis and end up paying $35 each) gives an excellent report of the good and bad things and whether the oil needs to be changed. You could do the first one around 3000 miles to set a baseline. Going forward each analysis compares it to your last one and to the global results for the same engine type. Sort of like having a complete blood analysis that tells you where your blood components are vs. the normal range. If you see a bad trend you can sell the vehicle....which is sometimes exactly what the prior owners of vehicles now on the used car market did.
 
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