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Discussion Starter #1
My 2016 big Range Rover V6 HSE is four years old this year. What are some of the issues that you guys have noticed around this mark?
I'm just under 26k. I work from home for the past three years and barely go out.
I'm very obedient with service and went every year. I thought about trading it in but I decided to keep it for now. I really like the blacked out look. I called my LR dealership and they couldnt even regurgitate good EW at me. I rarely drive anymore so I'm just wondering if extended warranty is a must or should I just set up a separate repair/service fund instead?
 

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2016-2018 Range Rover Sport
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154 Posts
Mine is a 2016 Sport TD6 with 33K miles. Pretty trouble free so far. You can expect to do brakes, tires, possibly a battery in the next year or so and you're probably pretty close to your next regular service. These are all maintenance items not covered by an extended warranty.
Extended warranty companies use actuaries to figure out typical failures, frequency, the average cost to repair. Some may exclude repairs that are very costly such as air suspension or electronics. They project what they're likely to pay out over the warranty period for an average vehicle of your year make and model, add their profit and a commission for the person selling it and that's your premium.
Based on your miles driven so far (about 1/2 of the average miles per year) an extended warranty will likely run out due to time before you hit the mileage cap. Odds are in your favor that you would spend less in repairs than the cost of the warranty and would likely be better off taking the amount of the extended warranty premium and setting it aside for repairs. And if you sell the vehicle, you get to keep whatever money is left over! Once you buy an extended warranty that money is gone and the only way to come out ahead is if you need an abnormally high number of repairs.
That said, there is value in having peace of mind and always the possibility that your vehicle will be more troublesome than average so it's really a personal choice.
 

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1995 p38a
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38 Posts
I'm a land rover tech.... So I'm biased.... But if you want to know, I can tell you the common things I deal with on your truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Mine is a 2016 Sport TD6 with 33K miles. Pretty trouble free so far. You can expect to do brakes, tires, possibly a battery in the next year or so and you're probably pretty close to your next regular service. These are all maintenance items not covered by an extended warranty.
Extended warranty companies use actuaries to figure out typical failures, frequency, the average cost to repair. Some may exclude repairs that are very costly such as air suspension or electronics. They project what they're likely to pay out over the warranty period for an average vehicle of your year make and model, add their profit and a commission for the person selling it and that's your premium.
Based on your miles driven so far (about 1/2 of the average miles per year) an extended warranty will likely run out due to time before you hit the mileage cap. Odds are in your favor that you would spend less in repairs than the cost of the warranty and would likely be better off taking the amount of the extended warranty premium and setting it aside for repairs. And if you sell the vehicle, you get to keep whatever money is left over! Once you buy an extended warranty that money is gone and the only way to come out ahead is if you need an abnormally high number of repairs.
That said, there is value in having peace of mind and always the possibility that your vehicle will be more troublesome than average so it's really a personal choice.
Thank you for your answer! My 30k service is coming up sooner or later so I'm setting aside some money for those things you mentioned. Do you know how much it costs to replace brakes?
 

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1995 p38a
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38 Posts
Obviously stay up.on your recommended services. Diff fluids, cabin and engine air filters, brake fluid, monitor for coolant leaks and watch out for valve cover gasket leaks.

Let's start with coolant leaks shall we, water pumps are an issue, don't think they have fully solved that yet. But be prepared to get that done at any moment.

Then there's the coolant outlet pipes, upper and lower in the front of the engine. You will need to lift or remove the supercharger to replace them. They updated them to a new design. If your pipes have a square flange looking seam, they are the old design and I recommend updating them when they leak, the common place for the leak is at the base elf the lower pipe and coolant will build up in the valley of the engine. There's a couple of spots where you can see it but it's hard to see unless you know where to look. Borescopes make it easy to diag.

Then there's the coolant cross pipe at the back of the heads and connects then together, it's much less common to see it leak, but when it does you will see staining down the bellhousing of the transmission.

Thermostat housing, not as common as the rest but always a possibility.

Just monitor the coolant level regularly.

Oil leaks, valve cover gaskets, timing covers, upper and lower will eventually leak, just because of the design, but that shouldn't be for a long time. Just monitor it and have it properly inspected during service.

Supercharger coupler issues have yet to be fully cured using dealer parts, I recommend when it goes out to replace it using the solid Delrin or plastic aftermarket replacements as a permanent fix.

AC problems, well really the only thing you may suffer from is that your vehicle takes a long time before the ac gets cold, it's the spool valve in the compressor, don't dick about replacing the valve, just replace the compressor.

The 2014+ engines despite having the updated rails and guides are still vulnerable to noise issues. Timing gears may make noise later on, it's hit or miss. And also the tappets still suffer from wear issues. These two typically indicate poor service history, so as long as your on-top of it you will be fine.

Oxygen sensors are an issue still with the 2016 model years.

Now onto model specific issues.

Typically the full size is actually pretty decent, not many issues really. Air compressors aren't common anymore but aren't out of the realm of possibilities. Air springs haven't started failing on me yet. Keyword, yet.

Front lower control arms are still an issue, like any full size since 2003, I like to consider them wear items these days.

Your car shouldn't suffer from any infotainment issues. I believe those started in 17-18.

Shifter failures aren't unheard of though, but not common.

This may seem like alot of issues. But it's really not. Overall you should have a decent rover there. The 3.0 is just the 5.0 without the last cylinders bored into the block. So it's still vulnerable to the typical 5.0/3.0 issues. But other than that I think the L405 is a vast improvement over the l322 trucks. I would keep it if I were you.

Atleast you didn't get the diesel. I don't care what anybody says, those motors are trash. I have a stack of connecting rod paperweights as proof.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Obviously stay up.on your recommended services. Diff fluids, cabin and engine air filters, brake fluid, monitor for coolant leaks and watch out for valve cover gasket leaks.

Let's start with coolant leaks shall we, water pumps are an issue, don't think they have fully solved that yet. But be prepared to get that done at any moment.

Then there's the coolant outlet pipes, upper and lower in the front of the engine. You will need to lift or remove the supercharger to replace them. They updated them to a new design. If your pipes have a square flange looking seam, they are the old design and I recommend updating them when they leak, the common place for the leak is at the base elf the lower pipe and coolant will build up in the valley of the engine. There's a couple of spots where you can see it but it's hard to see unless you know where to look. Borescopes make it easy to diag.

Then there's the coolant cross pipe at the back of the heads and connects then together, it's much less common to see it leak, but when it does you will see staining down the bellhousing of the transmission.

Thermostat housing, not as common as the rest but always a possibility.

Just monitor the coolant level regularly.

Oil leaks, valve cover gaskets, timing covers, upper and lower will eventually leak, just because of the design, but that shouldn't be for a long time. Just monitor it and have it properly inspected during service.

Supercharger coupler issues have yet to be fully cured using dealer parts, I recommend when it goes out to replace it using the solid Delrin or plastic aftermarket replacements as a permanent fix.

AC problems, well really the only thing you may suffer from is that your vehicle takes a long time before the ac gets cold, it's the spool valve in the compressor, don't dick about replacing the valve, just replace the compressor.

The 2014+ engines despite having the updated rails and guides are still vulnerable to noise issues. Timing gears may make noise later on, it's hit or miss. And also the tappets still suffer from wear issues. These two typically indicate poor service history, so as long as your on-top of it you will be fine.

Oxygen sensors are an issue still with the 2016 model years.

Now onto model specific issues.

Typically the full size is actually pretty decent, not many issues really. Air compressors aren't common anymore but aren't out of the realm of possibilities. Air springs haven't started failing on me yet. Keyword, yet.

Front lower control arms are still an issue, like any full size since 2003, I like to consider them wear items these days.

Your car shouldn't suffer from any infotainment issues. I believe those started in 17-18.

Shifter failures aren't unheard of though, but not common.

This may seem like alot of issues. But it's really not. Overall you should have a decent rover there. The 3.0 is just the 5.0 without the last cylinders bored into the block. So it's still vulnerable to the typical 5.0/3.0 issues. But other than that I think the L405 is a vast improvement over the l322 trucks. I would keep it if I were you.

Atleast you didn't get the diesel. I don't care what anybody says, those motors are trash. I have a stack of connecting rod paperweights as proof.
Thanks so much for your reply I certainly bookmarked your post. As far as extended warranties, do you recommend them?
 

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1995 p38a
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38 Posts
Thanks so much for your reply I certainly bookmarked your post. As far as extended warranties, do you recommend them?
Yes and no. There are good ones and bad ones. But every one seems to be the same in the end, it's just a matter of how much fighting you will have to do to get them to pay for the repair and not weasel their way out, or try to cheapen out on it.

The best by far is the Certified Preowned warranty from land rover themselves. It's bumper to bumper and hassle free. However that may involve you having to get another rover.
 
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