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2014 RRS
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2014 RRS that has been great for the past 8 years. Recently, when unattended for a hour or so, the car slowly drops to near access height. Obviously, this means I must have an air leak. This hasn't been a problem yet, but I don't want to burn out my compressor. Reading through some threads, it has been mentioned that a front strut is often the culpret and can throw a code when scanned. I have an Autel and will check it. Does anyone have any other ideas or suggestions? I know there are many yards of air line hidden throughout the car and would like to narrow down the possible problem areas. Thanks
 

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‘16 HSE Loire Blue/Almond, Useless 3rd Row
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I’m sorry, but I don’t. However, if you ever pick up an ABC-equipped AMG, I’m extremely well-versed in that one!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I’m sorry, but I don’t. However, if you ever pick up an ABC-equipped AMG, I’m extremely well-versed in that one!
I'll remember that Poppy. Thanks :)

My 2014, I have to change both front suspension last year, when start leaking like that the process is irreversible.
Any idea how they knew both struts were bad? Does the computer throw a code?
 

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I'll remember that Poppy. Thanks :)


Any idea how they knew both struts were bad? Does the computer throw a code?
No code, but if you have a really quite place where you can park your car, you hear the air loosing, plus when driving (only on small street with walls) you can hear the compressor that is always on. That is the indicator that the seals in your suspension are gone.
 

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2014 RRS
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
No code, but if you have a really quite place where you can park your car, you hear the air loosing, plus when driving (only on small street with walls) you can hear the compressor that is always on. That is the indicator that the seals in your suspension are gone.
(y)
 

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You just need to pin point a source on which strut is losing air, then use a spray bottle with soapy water on areas, where it is susceptible to air leakage. Usually spray over the air line connector at the top of a strut and use an extendable mirror and a flash light to see, if it shows any foamy bubbles, which indicates air leakage source. If none of the air line is showing any bubbles on all struts, or if you have either both front struts only, or rear struts only sagging down simultaneously, then it could be the valve block that could be the culprit. You need to spray soapy water to see, if it bubbles up on the valve block for signs of air leakage.

I once solved my air leakage on a front strut with an air line leaking below the connector. There's no fault codes, compressor works fine, but only slowly leaking overnight. I bought a new connector part with a new O-ring seal from LR to replace it, but it did not solve the leakage problem, so I wasted $30 on a new LR part. I used a Masters Orange Tape wrapped around the brass connector thread to try seal the leak. It really worked in sealing the air leakage through a threading, as a cheaper solution fix that only cost me $4, plus $1 for a 12mm crowfoot wrench that attaches to a torque wrench to work on extremely tight limited space above the strut, instead of spending thousands on a new strut + labor installation. I no longer have any air leakage issues so far and am very happy with my DIY fix results.

Links to parts:
Masters Orange Tape
12mm 3/8 Crowfoot Wrench
 

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2014 RRS
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You just need to pin point a source on which strut is losing air, then use a spray bottle with soapy water on areas, where it is susceptible to air leakage. Usually spray over the air line connector at the top of a strut and use an extendable mirror and a flash light to see, if it shows any foamy bubbles, which indicates air leakage source. If none of the air line is showing any bubbles on all struts, or if you have either both front struts only, or rear struts only sagging down simultaneously, then it could be the valve block that could be the culprit. You need to spray soapy water to see, if it bubbles up on the valve block for signs of air leakage.

I once solved my air leakage on a front strut with an air line leaking below the connector. There's no fault codes, compressor works fine, but only slowly leaking overnight. I bought a new connector part with a new O-ring seal from LR to replace it, but it did not solve the leakage problem, so I wasted $30 on a new LR part. I used a Masters Orange Tape wrapped around the brass connector thread to try seal the leak. It really worked in sealing the air leakage through a threading, as a cheaper solution fix that only cost me $4, plus $1 for a 12mm crowfoot wrench that attaches to a torque wrench to work on extremely tight limited space above the strut, instead of spending thousands on a new strut + labor installation. I no longer have any air leakage issues so far and am very happy with my DIY fix results.

Links to parts:
Masters Orange Tape
12mm 3/8 Crowfoot Wrench
Thanks. I’ll try this weekend
 

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2015 Range Rover Sport SCV8 HSE Dynamic
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If you have an IID tool, you can disable/lock the valve block.

Put the car in off-road height, then disable the valve block. Leave the car overnight, and then in the morning you should see which corner is the culprit, as only that one will drop during the night.

At least that way you can narrow down the source of the problem. Then it's a matter of whether it's the air strut or the air lines to that corner.

If it's not a strut/air line, but the valve block, then even the latter is disabled the car will drop overnight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If you have an IID tool, you can disable/lock the valve block.

Put the car in off-road height, then disable the valve block. Leave the car overnight, and then in the morning you should see which corner is the culprit, as only that one will drop during the night.

At least that way you can narrow down the source of the problem. Then it's a matter of whether it's the air strut or the air lines to that corner.

If it's not a strut/air line, but the valve block, then even the latter is disabled the car will drop overnight.
Very helpful. Thanks Naks. I'm hooking up my Autel 808 this weekend. I doubt if that will be able to disable the valve block but I'll check.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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It is almost impossible to level the truck in replacing only 1 front airbag. You need to replace both front bags to be able to level it properly. IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Drove the car into our level garage yesterday (it normally is outside on a tilted driveway. The car loses about 1/2" every half hour in front. Rears take longer. I still need to see what Autel tells me.
 
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