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Discussion Starter #1
I see some halfway convincing movement from a cold startup, except that warm-up is extremely fast. By the time I leave my development (90 seconds) the temperature has reached the midway mark. In comparison, I have a 2004 Dodge Durango 5.7L that takes almost 10 minutes to fully warm up (temp gauge reaching its resting point, a tick below half).

Once warmed up, I'm used to my old vehicle having some fluctuations in response to hot summer weather. 100 deg F outdoor temps and sitting in traffic (especially an interstate blockage) will at least touch the midway mark, sometimes creeping a needle's width over.

The Rover's on-screen temperature gauge, once warm, doesn't move at all. Not one single pixel! I'm concerned this may be a dupe for drivers, similar to Ford's oil pressure "switch" that displays a set needle position for "driver peace of mind" until it hits a low threshold and sets off the idiot light.

Anyone look into this?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Analog coolant temperature gauges are always heavy dampened in the normal temperature band for this exact reason, there will always be someone seeing the needle twitching up and down a few degrees and having the car at the dealer every week having the "faulty" thermostat replaced or something else looked at under warrantee. I'm going to guess that the LCD version of the needle is looking at a signal that has been already been dampened for the same reason.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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127 Posts
You need a good code reader like iLAND from Atlantic British or something else that can read the live data like Engine temp, radiator coolant temp, and main coolant temp. Then you can really troubleshoot what’s going on.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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408 Posts
Yes, those LR temperature gauges are useless - in my Defender, it goes to Warm within 2 km, but I have an engine monitoring system, which shows me the real coolant temperature, and on a cold day it usually take 8-10km to get to 90C.

By the time the gauge moves, your engine is probably already toast!

I would recommend you get a GAP tool and then you can monitor the real temperatures, at least it will allow you to work out when the engine is really warmed up, so that you don't overstress a cold engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I will definitely have to purchase a more expensive and more comprehensive OBD-II tool. My little $29 Wi-Fi communicating ELM327 scan tool can stream live data from my domestics, with a little "dashboard" that lets you pick which gauges show. Unfortunately it freezes in the LR. It will get a reading and freeze until you disconnect and re-connect. Then you get another snapshot. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Sorry to bump but I have some new information after some recent successes:

Dug up an old ELM327 that I already had, and connected via Bluetooth to an old Android phone. Out of pocket cost: $0

(My adapter that would get one reading and freeze was a Wi-Fi unit I used with my iPhone. Apple devices don’t allow the right Bluetooth profile for the required data transfer, so only Wi-Fi OBD-II devices work with iPhones.)

The coolant temp maintained around 183 degrees for a 30-minute trip this evening. Much cooler than my 2004 Durango with its factory 203 degree thermostat!

Another key difference I observed was in the difference between the ambient air and intake air temperatures. On the naturally aspirated Hemi, intake was 10 deg above ambient consistently on an extended trip. On the 5.0 S/C, the intake hovered between 40-55 deg above ambient, cruising below at about 1500 RPM.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Hi guys,

With the BMW M62 engine, there is a "active temperature regulator".
In fact, the temperature regulator is adjusted by the coolant temperature (as in every engine). On top of that, there is a resistor inside that adjustes the opening of the cooling valve. It allows for a quicker warmup and a better cooling in hot temperatures.

Besides, the temperature gauge on the dash is usually the coolant-head-exit temperature. That one warms up very fast, and needs to be stable.
If you use a code reader, you may read other measures, such as coolant-inlet ; oil temp...

On top of these on considerations, it is very likely that the temp reading on the dash is filtered to avoid scaring drivers.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi guys,

With the BMW M62 engine, there is a "active temperature regulator".
In fact, the temperature regulator is adjusted by the coolant temperature (as in every engine). On top of that, there is a resistor inside that adjustes the opening of the cooling valve. It allows for a quicker warmup and a better cooling in hot temperatures.

Besides, the temperature gauge on the dash is usually the coolant-head-exit temperature. That one warms up very fast, and needs to be stable.
If you use a code reader, you may read other measures, such as coolant-inlet ; oil temp...

On top of these on considerations, it is very likely that the temp reading on the dash is filtered to avoid scaring drivers.
Based off of the observed behavior during readings, the dash coolant temp gauge was perfectly vertical by 160 deg, same like it was at the fully warm 183 deg. Not a pixel of movement between them. This is beyond dampened, I'm still searching for a better word.

I'll confirm this later tonight but the initial cold-start sweep may instead be tied to the drop in RPM. An interesting performance, to say the least. I'm not battling any particular issue at the moment, temps are good per my scan tool. It's fun trying to understand the logic that goes on behind the scenes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It's just some timer with an engineered sweep up to the 50% mark. Rev drop occurred before needle was done with the initial movement.
 
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