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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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1,945 Posts
if you have a programming tool you can do it your self,

Your local indi shop might this tool, ask him.
Otherwise your at the mercy of the dealer

We have a tool at my shop and it took me 5 mins to program the key.
about 4 mins spent hooking up the tool,
then going through the Vehicle ID,
and then finding the setup section ,
then reading the directions ,
then 30 second to program the key
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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187 Posts
The GAP tool can program keys. If they are going to ding you for 2 hrs, i'd use that to off-set the price of the tool. The GAP is almost a must-have.
 

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53 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thank u all. Dealer has tried 2 fobs cannot program says its something in the Rover preventing keys to be programmed. They've had my rover for 2 days and can't fix it? Any ideas? Not sure what to do if dealer can't figure it out ?
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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364 Posts
1) Are they attempting to ADD or simply duplicate a (second/spare) key to your original - in other words, clone off or copy from the original/existing key fob's security settings?

2) Or, are they attempting to zero out the existing key record(s) in the car's memory and start over from scratch and create new security settings with the two new keyfobs?

If your answer is 1) does the original key still work?

If your answer is 2) the dealer's diagnostic laptop would need to be connected to the LR dealer network via a strong wifi link in order to download the security code(s) for the new key(s) to be "seen throughout" the entire coding process. A signal interruption during the coding process often becomes a jeopardy event, sometimes requiring significantly more work up to and including restoring the original build software via download to the central junction box (CJB - behind the lower glovebox area) and starting over from there.

FWIW, when the Tech proceeds through the coding steps, the key fob (in fact, all key fobs intended to be coded) usually need to be in close proximity to the shift lever (although, sometimes, waving the key around between the rear view mirror and gearshift lever is necessary due to a weak security antenna behind the temp control/clock fascia).

3) Did the same dealer attempting to code the keyfob(s) supply the additional/second key or did you buy it elsewhere?

Has the dealer mentioned the word "brick" or "bricked" to you yet?

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Rob thank you! IDK they have a "Range Rover Guy" that'll be in on Mon. (Side note)...This is a upscale, respected dealer) yet IDK they just don't seem to know what they're doing. They've ordered the new fob charging me $260. They thought the 1st one was bad so this was the second one they ordered. Its one with the key blade not just fob. Today they said it might be the keyless entry module, their cost $2,000 not including labor. I asked if they could determine for a fact it was the module they said no. I'm in WI not many Rover Dealers or Independent Import places around. Been scouring the web and manuals to see what I can gleam, if anything. The other indi places I called said LR requires a subscription in order to program keys and they don't subscribe.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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364 Posts
So, just to be clear, your vehicle is NOT at a JLR dealership?

Therefore, unless they have direct access to the JLR dealer network (highly unlikely) they will be unable to reload an original build code AND reset the security for a new key fob from scratch. A dealer (or subscriber) PIN code is needed to reset the security files as a precaution to prevent any Tom, Dick or Harry from making key fobs.

New key fobs may be "copied" or cloned using more generic workshop tools from an original without accessing JLR's network (for the security partition) BUT ONLY IF the existing key fob works and the additional key is essentially just being copied to a vehicle's current security file.

There have been reports (mostly in the EU) whereby a thief used a tool to scan a homeowner's property for a keyfob's signal and "grabs" that signal in order to then create a clone key and steal the vehicle at a later time. That's one reason to never leave the key fob in the center console when you park it in your home's garage, but I digress.

More info than you probably need....

To your business.

The keyless module (pt # LR071651) is around $250-300 depending on where you order it from, so I think it's becoming clear that the folks who currently have your car are not necessarily the correct folks to waste too much more time and money with.

Based on your info above, I don't think they have the correct equipment to do what you need done, unless their "Rover guy" does indeed know what they're doing and fully understands the difference between cloning and completely recoding the keyless security files. He should know that the latter needs the proprietary JLR network access. Keep your fingers crossed!

Otherwise, as a potential alternate repairer to this issue, you may want to start looking for a close by friendly Jaguar dealer in the hope that they are able to offer a solution.



Is there a Jaguar dealer nearby?

If so, they may be able to better help with this, given the limited LR dealer proximity.

If not, and the car no longer starts and runs (in other words needs to be "towed or recovered" to another competent JLR dealer) you may want to begin laying out a case for the present dealer to pay for the vehicle's movement to a mainline JLR dealer (in order to complete the job they started but are unable to finish).

Rob
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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1,151 Posts
If your original key (still) works then its not the immobilizer, don't let them jam you for $2000. Either they don't know what they are doing or the new fob doesn't have the immobilizer chip in it, don't know if they ship with a chip or not with FOBs after 2009, or if they just expect the dealer to swap over the working one when the FOB is delivered. My 2006 key would not ship with a chip if I just went in and bought one from the dealer, but my immobilizer system is a little different than yours.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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364 Posts
Mark,

New 2010-2012 L322 key fobs are essentially "blank chips" which are coded to the vehicle, on site, using the proprietary JLR dealer security PIN-coded program. The key blade is available separately and that is supplied as cut to the original profile from the VIN.

Blank additional key fobs may be "cloned/added" to existing security files providing at least one original key fob is working and available.

Keyless modules rarely fail, however the various antennae dotted around the vehicle do seem to occasionally lose their capability.

The central junction box (CJB) is coded to a specific VIN and cannot be used or recycled for another VIN. Once written, it either works (and continues to work from new) or it doesn't.

One problem when coding keys to these year models is an interruption to the connection with the JLR network, thus running the risk of corrupting the CJB and rendering it useless (known as "bricked"). Sometimes, with considerable luck, a second attempt to upload the original code will succeed. If so, go buy a lottery ticket :)

Replacing the CJB (part cost around $800-1200 depending on vendor) and the dealer labor charge to recode (uploading the original build code) is not untypical when problems with replacement and or original keys remains unresolved. This is likely where the reference to "$2000 not including labor..." is coming from but I think there's either some mis-communication or mis-understanding on the owner's part.

From the original poster's comment regarding "...2 hours to program":

While a dealer may be able to justify a two hour charge to simply code a key fob, given its investment in the proprietary equipment, TOPIX subscription and personnel training necessary to perform the work, it's actually about a 15-20 minute procedure (if all goes to plan).

Rob
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I knew the 10s and up were a little different than the earlier ones. But if the dealer bricked my immobilizer while adding a key thru their actions, I know one person whos not going to be paying for a new one, and that would be me.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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185 Posts
New key fobs may be "copied" or cloned using more generic workshop tools from an original without accessing JLR's network (for the security partition) BUT ONLY IF the existing key fob works and the additional key is essentially just being copied to a vehicle's current security file.
Heya Rob....what do you mean by, "more generic workshop tools"? Is there any software out there that we mortals can use to clone or replicate keys? Currently, I have a fully working key and would like to make two extra copies (I only received one at the time of purchase). I'm not sure if any of the current diagnostic software out there for the 2010-2012's has the capability of programming/cloning new keys. I'd like to try doing this myself rather than taking it to an indy (let alone a dealership).
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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1,151 Posts
Yes there is software you can get, you can use the SDD software and an OBDII interface to burn keys for the 2010 thru 2012 trucks. Theres a way around getting the PIN code for key programming that just involves running one of the files included in the SDD software as a standalone program instead of trying to use it via the links in the program so you don't have to tie into the JLR network. You can clone (you have to have a working key and access to the truck) the 2006 to 2009 keys with a CN900 Mini programmer, and you can use a BMW PK90+ programmer to add new keys to a 2002 to 2005 range rover.
 
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