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Discussion Starter #1
My wife and I bought a 2011 SC about two months ago. Car is clean and maintenance record appears clean.
We went to her aunts haouse for a visit, and after an hour or so there, we went to leave. The car wouldn’t start! It is flashing codes like crazy, and won’t even attempt to crank. I tried jumping it, and charging the battery overnight with no luck. No symptoms previously. Any advice??

Codes on dash are as follows:
The typical “press brake when starting,” but it it pressed.
“ABS FAULT”
“Park brake fault” (still audibly engages)
“Stability control not available”
“EBD FAULT”
“Emergency brake assist not available”
“Gearbox fault”
“Adaptive dynamics fault”
“Engine systems fault”

Any ideas at all? I have yet to test the battery, but I will as soon as I can. Thanks in advance.
 

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1,308 Posts
When brake pedal is depressed, is it hard?

If so, smash down the pedal as hard as you can, and try starting.

If not, disconnect negative battery terminal, wait 10 minutes, touch the negative to positive terminals together, then reconnect. Sounds like a low voltage issue that caused hard faults.

If you have access to a Rover specific tool, ie iLand or IIDTool, that would be tremendously helpful.
 

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All examples of erroneous error codes thrown by a failing/weak battery. In your case it just went kaput at a really bad time. Since you can;t start the rig, you are unable to complete many of the basic electrical tests in the stickie above. A suddenly dead battery could be from already being weak, old age, or a failing alternator. before jumping to the alternator you have various cables between them as well as grounds. Easy to check are your cables. Everyone checks and cleans their battery connections. Almost no owners gets dirty enough to trace the positive cables to the underhood fuse box and down to the starter and up to the alternator.Trace your positive cables, make sure they are spotless and tight. Trace your grounds through whatever junctions and make sure they clean and tight. Then if you have a multi meter check your cables for resistance. An internally corroded cable will keep a healthy alternator's output from reaching the battery. test directions are in the electrical trouble shooting stickie above.

Don;t sweat too much, there are things you can check on your own with basic tools. Multimeters are cheap for the level of basic testing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Unfortunately I don’t. There is a dealer nearby,
but I want to exhaust all other options.
I will try testing the battery and various cables whenever I can get
to it. It’s been a busy weekend, with more plans ahead. Whenever I get
to it, I’ll go from there. I appreciate the insight. I’m just really hoping it’s a fairly simple fix, as this is our main child
transporta
 
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