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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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54 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Team,
I have found my first issue with my daughters truck that I need to address. The electronic parkingbrake is not working and I am hoping it is something simple such as a fuse. I have searched Google and this forum and do not easily find anyone withe that same issue so I figured I throw up a post and see of anyone has had a similar problem. I have no warning lights or anything on the dash to indicate there is a problem and when I engage the brake I DO NOT hear the small electric motor that you think you'd typically hear. In addition, when I engage the lever, the light that is supposed to come on in the cluster does not illuminate. I am assuming this system runs on brake shoes engaging inside one of the rear discs since I do not see a small caliper like some electronic emergency brakes. Any ideas here? Failed motor, blown fuse, unplug connector? Any ideas are appreciated. My daughter and I are going to work on the truck today and I am going to teach her a few basic things about the Range Rover. Hoping to get any forum input so that we can shase down the simple stuff. She's showing an interest and I figure the more she knows the better off she will be.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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327 Posts
The EPB uses shoes inside the rear rotor drums. I think it's unusual that there's no warning of any kind.
 

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is it not engaging or not releasing? or is it not doing anything? as often as people report issues with the gears in the control motor, it may simply have been disconnected.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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54 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Toad,

Luckily its in the "released" or "unengaged" mode meaning its not stuck in a clamped position. When I pull on the EPB handle on the center console, exactly nothing happens. No noise, no light, no nothing.....

is it not engaging or not releasing? or is it not doing anything? as often as people report issues with the gears in the control motor, it may simply have been disconnected.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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382 Posts
Check the 30A fuse in the rear (aux) fuse box.

Caution....You may be playing with fire here as, if the PBM itself is faulty and you're planning to fix the problem, the rear subframe has to be dropped to gain access to the module for replacement. It's an all-day job with the correct tools if you know what you're doing ;)

OTOH, if the PBM does suddenly start working correctly be sure and test the emergency release function, which is just in front of and slightly lower than the rear fuse box. It looks like a loop of bicycle brake cable. Pull on it to manually please the parking brake module's "parked" position.

PBM's often are unused for many years (prior owner(s) solely relying on the transmission's P to provide sufficient parking immobility) until a new owner suddenly decides to use the parking brake.

In the interim, the module can simply fail in the "parking brake off" position due to lack of use.

Given the hassle of replacing the PBM, it may be worth spending a few $$ at a reputable shop which can check whether the PCM can be communicated with or not using SDD.

Occasionally, it is possible to "wake up" a long dormant PBM.

Rob
 

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Registered
2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
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54 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the details Rob......I will check the fuse and go from there. Lots of good info here.

Check the 30A fuse in the rear (aux) fuse box.

Caution....You may be playing with fire here as, if the PBM itself is faulty and you're planning to fix the problem, the rear subframe has to be dropped to gain access to the module for replacement. It's an all-day job with the correct tools if you know what you're doing ;)

OTOH, if the PBM does suddenly start working correctly be sure and test the emergency release function, which is just in front of and slightly lower than the rear fuse box. It looks like a loop of bicycle brake cable. Pull on it to manually please the parking brake module's "parked" position.

PBM's often are unused for many years (prior owner(s) solely relying on the transmission's P to provide sufficient parking immobility) until a new owner suddenly decides to use the parking brake.

In the interim, the module can simply fail in the "parking brake off" position due to lack of use.

Given the hassle of replacing the PBM, it may be worth spending a few $$ at a reputable shop which can check whether the PCM can be communicated with or not using SDD.

Occasionally, it is possible to "wake up" a long dormant PBM.

Rob
 
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