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Discussion Starter #1
275/60R20 BFG K02's. RR Sport wheels, 20x9.5 with 53 offset. Got them cheap used, and had them powder coated.. They look beautiful in person in daylight.

My first real mod, before a trip up to Arrowhead with a local LR club.. I hope it performs as well as it looks :D
Instant rubbing on passenger rear wheel well in the front.. as suspected. Some massaging or continued driving should take care of it(self). However, no rubbing (yet) when going lock to lock, even in stock ride height mode. Johnson rods have yet to be installed. Pics show truck in offroad height, however.

IMG_2155a.jpg IMG_2160a.jpg IMG_2157.JPG
 

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I'll be interested to hear how you like them long term. I used to run slightly oversized zeons on my '04... I was always a little annoyed with them, and annoying that the spare can't fit in the compartment anymore. Now, I have 19" sport rims and stock size zeons that I like much better... and never have to worry about what happens if the airbags ever have a fault.

Performance off road seems identical to the larger ones.
 

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If you want to make it ride higher it's much better to use a diagnostic tool (like IIdtool, Allcoms etc) to adjust the suspension ECU.

The only reason to use Johnson rods is because you wouldn't have a diagnostic tool, but then you don't have the Johnson rods either so why not spend just a little bit more and do it the proper way?

In any case if you intend to do any DIY repairs or modifications whatsoever then a decent diagnostic tool is probably the first thing you should get.
 

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I agree with the Johnson rods, I don't understand why so many people use those. I see the diagnostic tool as almost indispensable because you can avoid expensive trips to the dealer for minor faults that are easy to resolve on your own. I have several different ones and I love them all for different reasons but they've paid for themselves many times over.
 

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I like how it looks but I think you might need longer bump stops just in case in addition to a lift. +1 about diagnostics such as iidtool
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you want to make it ride higher it's much better to use a diagnostic tool (like IIdtool, Allcoms etc) to adjust the suspension ECU.

The only reason to use Johnson rods is because you wouldn't have a diagnostic tool, but then you don't have the Johnson rods either so why not spend just a little bit more and do it the proper way?

In any case if you intend to do any DIY repairs or modifications whatsoever then a decent diagnostic tool is probably the first thing you should get.
I bought both the rods and the IIDTool.. so far have only used the tool, front rods were too difficult to install with the location of them and my time constraint before my trip this weekend. So far I don't need them. But wante to get the initial raise from the rods, and fine tune with the Tool.
 

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Good thing you haven't installed them rods yet. Since you already bought them I suggest you find an alternative use for them such as making a modern sculpture or coat-hanger or something.

The Johnson rods work by lying to the EAS height sensors about the vehicle height and will achieve nothing that the EAS ECU won't give you anyway if you just ask it nicely.

I think the only reason that Johnson rods exist is because there was a time when you could not buy a third party diagnostic tool to adjust the suspension yourself and the official dealers would not do it for you. The rods were an easy way to bypass that problem and nothing more. Once you can adjust the ECU there is no reason to deceive it and various reasons why not to.

On another note if you are lifting the ride height more than an inch or so keep in mind that you really should have the suspension geometry realigned professionally to keep the vehicle handling safely on the road as the toe and camber change considerably with ride height.

When deciding how far to push it keep in mind also the reduction in rebound travel which is already down to just four inches (95mm) in the factory offroad-mode. The longer bump stops will not in any way help to restore the rebound travel, though they will of course prevent bottoming out if you lose air.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Good thing you haven't installed them rods yet. Since you already bought them I suggest you find an alternative use for them such as making a modern sculpture or coat-hanger or something.

The Johnson rods work by lying to the EAS height sensors about the vehicle height and will achieve nothing that the EAS ECU won't give you anyway if you just ask it nicely.

I think the only reason that Johnson rods exist is because there was a time when you could not buy a third party diagnostic tool to adjust the suspension yourself and the official dealers would not do it for you. The rods were an easy way to bypass that problem and nothing more. Once you can adjust the ECU there is no reason to deceive it and various reasons why not to.

On another note if you are lifting the ride height more than an inch or so keep in mind that you really should have the suspension geometry realigned professionally to keep the vehicle handling safely on the road as the toe and camber change considerably with ride height.

When deciding how far to push it keep in mind also the reduction in rebound travel which is already down to just four inches (95mm) in the factory offroad-mode. The longer bump stops will not in any way help to restore the rebound travel, though they will of course prevent bottoming out if you lose air.
Noted. I bought the rods in case the GAP tool didn't raise it high enough for clearance. I know that I would need a 2" lift for clearance, and I think I got maybe 35mm from the tool. Some people can't get more than that, some can get closer to 2". So this is one reason rods can come in handy, if your EAS won't allow you to go higher due to "out of range" spec.

I do wan't to find a way to safely move the bags by 2" in conjuction with the suspension lift, so that the bags would have the same amount of air pressure as if it were at stock ride height.. I think this has been done for the LR3/4 guys, but not FFRR.

Right now I am still getting rubbing on the right rear filler neck area. 15-20mm spacer would probably solve it, but I really don't want to deal with spacers. Or, more trimming.

In a perfect world, I would have the suspension as close to stock when on the street without rubbing, and put in an offroad profile in the GAP tool when offroad. When in offroad mode, its raising even further still, and yes I am probably running out of rebound, punishing bushings and axles, etc.

Some more photos offroad from last weekend in Arrowhead... last pic you can see close to actual offroad ride height.


IMG_2241a.jpg
IMG_2236.jpg
IMG_2215.jpg
 

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If you cannot lift more than 35mm with your tool, then something isn't right. The OEM super extended mode is much more than that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Been offroading a bit, and found that I get the best performance when I select a terrain program, then lower it back down to "standard" ride height, which is in fact probably equal to the factory offroad setting. Less chance of running out of suspension droop, and softer "spring rate" on the trail. plenty of clearance so far with these tires, whereas other D2s and LR3s are hitting bumpers and frame.
 

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I appreciate the info you've shared in this thread. Getting close to picking up a 2010+ SC model and wanted to be sure those RRS wheels still fit the brembos. Might not run 33" tires myself though - might stick to 275/55 or 285/50 for a 31.9" profile. Grey exterior with black accents is exactly what I'm going for - well done!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I appreciate the info you've shared in this thread. Getting close to picking up a 2010+ SC model and wanted to be sure those RRS wheels still fit the brembos. Might not run 33" tires myself though - might stick to 275/55 or 285/50 for a 31.9" profile. Grey exterior with black accents is exactly what I'm going for - well done!
Older RRS wheels fit no problem. They are 1" wider than the FFRR wheels (??) and +5mm offset to compensate. I do get rubbing from time to time, mostly at the filler neck passenger rear, but I have lowered my car back down from being raised with the IIDTool, as to have the lowest CG as possible while towing.

Main goal with the 33" tires was to get max sidewall. I had a hard time deciding.. and would appreicate more wheel well clearance with 32 - 32.5" range. I was all set to swap my brembos over for stock HSE brakes and run 18" wheels ( I have in hand 18" LR3 wheels) but in the end kept it simple and kept the brembos to help with the braking needs of pulling a 6000 lb Airstream up and down mountain roads.

You likely wont have any rubbing issues with the 32s. Maybe only minor or rare awkward suspension articulation angles.
More photos attached.

LASTLY.. if you are getting a 2010 RR, make sure it has the updated metal timing chain guides, or you will want to budget 3500 bucks or so (from an independent shop) to update/fix this, as well as replace all of the other parts while in there. They will make noise due to slack in the chain.. more annoying than anything else, but the problem also lies in the chain bowing out too much and sheering of some oil galleys (according to my local tech). So the problem should be rectified. Also, blower coupler could be noisy/worn as well, probably around 1200-1500 fix. In the end, these are annoying noisy motors. But I still really love this truck

I believe sometime in 2011 they came from the factory with the metal guides.

IMG_2352a.jpg IMG_2883a.jpg 20160124_192231.jpg
 

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I should have my RR back from 4 wheel parts today. I couldn't fit 285-55-20's on my 9 spoke SC wheels. It pressed right up against the airbag and that was with the johnson rods. So I had to purchase after market wheels to make it work. Your RR is awesome!!!
 

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How is this setup still working out after 2 years?

Looking at roughly the same setup for our new '11 RRSC and been reading up on differences between going GapIID or the rods. I've also been trying to pursue a set of 20x9.5 +53 wheels and run a 33" BFG without modifying much.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
How is this setup still working out after 2 years?

Looking at roughly the same setup for our new '11 RRSC and been reading up on differences between going GapIID or the rods. I've also been trying to pursue a set of 20x9.5 +53 wheels and run a 33" BFG without modifying much.
Wow, has it been that long?? Overall, they have been great, performance wise. I have a lot of confidence in most all conditions, except for snow. I think its a function of not enough sisdewall, and crappy snow conditions, where I have gotten stuck a couple times.. but so was everyone else. I can't air down enough with 20s, or it becomes quite risky. I once had to go to 10psi to get out of a bad situation, and later got a puncture somehow (3 feet of snow). Light snow is fine. I think the weight of the RR is not helping in certain snow conditions.

They are noisy. They did rub a lot in the beginning. I trimmed a bit, and as mentioned, some trim just took care of itself.. I do daily drive it now, and rubbing is a minor issue on turns and articulation. Off road, I get rubbing semi-regularly, but not terrible. Sometimes, its bad. I would probably do the 285/55s if I did it over again.. of course the wider patch may cause other problems. My goal was to get as much sidewall as possible. Another consideration was the rating on the tires- better for towing, I think they had 8 ply LT rating, because we use the rig to pull our 25' Airstream.

Overall, they work very well and I am happy with the result, (and look to be honest..). The biggest downside is schlepping the full size 33" spare on the roof rack when I take it on off-road trips, and then pulling it back down.

As much as I like the style of the RRS SC wheels I got, they are too wide for offroad use and these tire sized.. I have the lips pretty torn up now from regular off-road use. I would go narrower if possible, and have more rounded sidewall bulge for protection. But.. they do look good. There aren't many options.

I have some more photos, but for some reason, the site upload box is blank..
 

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Thanks for the reply! I'm not the biggest fan of 20's for the same reason. My F-350 has 37" tires/18" wheels specifically for trail use and towing comfort and first thing I was hesitant about buying the SC was the brake clearance for smaller wheels... obviously not possible.

Now I'm curious about the 275/60/20 on a 20x8.5. I looked at the 275/55/20 and it just looks like it is not enough sidewall protection. BFG KO2's run a little small from my past experience with them.

Did you end up sticking with the rods and a computer reprogram together, or just one solution?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for the reply! I'm not the biggest fan of 20's for the same reason. My F-350 has 37" tires/18" wheels specifically for trail use and towing comfort and first thing I was hesitant about buying the SC was the brake clearance for smaller wheels... obviously not possible.

Now I'm curious about the 275/60/20 on a 20x8.5. I looked at the 275/55/20 and it just looks like it is not enough sidewall protection. BFG KO2's run a little small from my past experience with them.

Did you end up sticking with the rods and a computer reprogram together, or just one solution?
Skip the rods. I never installed them. Get the GAP tool, which I use and it works pretty well.. or maybe try that new Atlantic British iLAND tool, which seems to have a nice interface. But no experience with it. They just lowered the price to 399.

http://www.roverparts.com/Parts/ILAND
 
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