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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Hello, I'm looking at a 2010 RRS HSE with 180,000km at a significant discount. it has a few mechanical issues but the body and interior are pretty good. The main issue is a rattle from the engine, believed to be the timing chain rattling. I'm fairly mechanically inclined but having watched some videos of taking apart the whole front and top of the engine to do the full timing chain job, I don't believe I could do it on my own. A shop quoted about $5k(Canadian) to do the job, which is factored into the discount. However...

I came across this video on doing the timing tensioners "the easy way" which seems much more feasible for a backyard mechanic. In the video, they state you can remove the timing chain covers and replace the tensioners and guides without having to remove the valve covers or needing to lock the cams.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1E4ahs-SHI

What do you think? I've searched through the timing chain posts but didnt see any guides on the job - any help would be appreciated or advice on this purchase.

Thanks!
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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102 Posts
Thanks for the post and video kl3vr. I guess the biggest negative would be if you ran into issues with the chains once you get in there?

The only other stuff I can think of is not getting a look at cams wear, and not having the opportunity to check carbon build-up at valves and injectors; basically extra stuff one might take care of while the top-end is exposed when doing it the "hard way."
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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42 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Hi Doc, thanks for your insight. I realize I may run into problems doing the job myself, so the full price of a shop job is discounted from the price in case I cannot finish the job myself and have to get it towed to a shop. I know I'd also want to do the "extra stuff" but the difference in cost to do the job the easy way versus the full job at $5-6k is just too hard not to consider.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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138 Posts
Hi Doc, thanks for your insight. I realize I may run into problems doing the job myself, so the full price of a shop job is discounted from the price in case I cannot finish the job myself and have to get it towed to a shop. I know I'd also want to do the "extra stuff" but the difference in cost to do the job the easy way versus the full job at $5-6k is just too hard not to consider.
So I would be careful with that! I just decided to do my supercharger snout coupler and while following all the instructions I could find it was a little bit more difficult that I hoped for but nothing too bad. Once I took a look at the valves I decided it was way too dirty and decided to take it to the shop to get walnut blasting to get it cleaned up. At that point it made sense for them to assemble everything instead of getting a tow truck back to my house plus they have a clean working area. I knew since I disassembled the engine they could not warranty it but they saw I did a decent job and said ok! Anyway after long two weeks there because they “found” engine heat exchanger leaking, which wasn’t before , but after they assembled everything they had to take it apart again so I said ok, that was on top of $1200. The whole supercharger snout after all costed me $2500 bucks. I had a major problem with the shop as they couldn’t get the parts fast enough and I was leaving on a trip soon. Now it’s been a week that I left for a trip and my car is being transported on a truck because of crankshaft correlation problem which had to do with timing from what I have been told. Moral to this story is... if you know you can go from A to Z go ahead, but you disassembling the engine thinking you will get a discount for half work done will cause you more harm then you hope and won’t have the warranty on the job!
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for sharing mik3ypl, I am weary of the shops too. If they get started on a "$5k job", they can end up charging you for whatever they want because they have your car and endless reasons to up the bill. This is why I was looking for more information about the "easy way" in the video and DIY'ing it.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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138 Posts
I saw a post on instagram that Atlantic British could be working on one, keep checking their website. I would love to to do it myself and save the money but I can’t be without a car. Good luck
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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5 Posts
don't you have to lock the cam/crank when loosening the central bolt?
i need to change my guides/tensioners on my 11 sport SC; and i am debating to do it this way, because I do not have the special tools to time the engine, etc...

From what I understood, the chains can stretch, due to the crappy guides/tensioner- but when they stretch- they make noise, and will usually throw faults (which I do not have)...
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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106 Posts
I've not read anything about the chains stretching, where did you get this from? The TC issue is two-fold as I understand it: 1 - Poor design for both the tensioners and guides. The steel plunger of the tensioner digs into the softer metal of the guide, and over time yields too much slack. 2 - The angle of attack of the original tensioner was such that it did not contact the guide in a square-on manner....making problem #1 even worse. Both of these parts have been redesigned. There is now a button of steel on the guide where the tensioner plunger makes contact, and the tensioner has been redesigned altogether, correcting the AOA.

I wish Land Rover would offer a service bulletin on the 2010-2012, making the repair affordable to those of us having to deal with this now.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover Sport
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I've not read anything about the chains stretching, where did you get this from? The TC issue is two-fold as I understand it: 1 - Poor design for both the tensioners and guides. The steel plunger of the tensioner digs into the softer metal of the guide, and over time yields too much slack. 2 - The angle of attack of the original tensioner was such that it did not contact the guide in a square-on manner....making problem #1 even worse. Both of these parts have been redesigned. There is now a button of steel on the guide where the tensioner plunger makes contact, and the tensioner has been redesigned altogether, correcting the AOA.

I wish Land Rover would offer a service bulletin on the 2010-2012, making the repair affordable to those of us having to deal with this now.
I have had this done last year at the dealer. I believe they replaced my chain due to it stretching. Of course the dealer could be 'stretching" the truth (haha), but they told me the chain does stretch over time, and it needed to be replaced with the tensioners. I do agree, that it would be nice for LR to absorb at least some portion of the cost. If I didn't purchase a warranty, I may have opted to just live with the noise.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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102 Posts
I am going to try this "easy" method myself. As much as I want to replace injectors, clean intake valves, and anything else I might find, this seems like a cost-effective way to start. If I find something unusual, I am prepared to purchase required tools, parts, and materials.

Just wanted to let y'all know the least expensive parts I have been able to find are at Land Rover FT Myers
http://parts.landroverftmyers.com for:

Part Number Part Name Price Quantity Total
LR051013 Tensioner Guide $60.82 2 $121.64
LR087162 Chain Tensioner $31.45 2 $62.90

Subtotal: $184.54
Estimated Shipping: $11.27
Total: $195.81

The YouTube poster "ChronCrew" advised the only other things required are zip-ties and high-temp RTV sealant; he recommended "International" for the RTV: 1830858C1 RTV Silicone Rubber T-442 $39.38 from Freedom Racing Tool and Auto
 

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I have had this done last year at the dealer. I believe they replaced my chain due to it stretching. Of course the dealer could be 'stretching" the truth (haha), but they told me the chain does stretch over time, and it needed to be replaced with the tensioners. I do agree, that it would be nice for LR to absorb at least some portion of the cost. If I didn't purchase a warranty, I may have opted to just live with the noise.
The parts are sort of irrelevant compared to the labour so it just make sense to do the chain, tensioners, and guides (and ideally the sprockets although they are not cheap) while you have it all open. Regardless of what they look like. Living with the noise is only an option until something breaks, and it will eventually.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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102 Posts
I am going to try this "easy" method myself. As much as I want to replace injectors, clean intake valves, and anything else I might find, this seems like a cost-effective way to start. If I find something unusual, I am prepared to purchase required tools, parts, and materials.

Just wanted to let y'all know the least expensive parts I have been able to find are at Land Rover FT Myers
http://parts.landroverftmyers.com for:

Part Number Part Name Price Quantity Total
LR051013 Tensioner Guide $60.82 2 $121.64
LR087162 Chain Tensioner $31.45 2 $62.90

Subtotal: $184.54
Estimated Shipping: $11.27
Total: $195.81

The YouTube poster "ChronCrew" advised the only other things required are zip-ties and high-temp RTV sealant; he recommended "International" for the RTV: 1830858C1 RTV Silicone Rubber T-442 $39.38 from Freedom Racing Tool and Auto
I screwed-up and purchased the wrong Chain Tensioner part above ^^^ The online cart switched the part(s) since it said the correct part (LR051008) does not fit?

Part NumberPart NamePriceQuantityTotal
LR051008Chain Tensioner$110.982$221.96
Subtotal: $221.96
Estimated Shipping: $13.59
Total: $235.55

If I find other issues (severe carbon buildup, when sprockets, stretched chain, etc), I will swiftly order additional parts and tools. I am not having major issues at the moment other than the chain not being quite as tight as I would like it. Had some odd crankshaft position codes awhile back which have not returned.

My motivation in doing the Chain Tensioners and Guides only is to get ahead of the issue as it seems imminent. It appears to me that through normal use the original Chain Tensioners will eventually wallow-out the aluminum Guides and the components will fail to maintain tension on the chain.
 
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