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Discussion Starter #1
I'm currently driving a 2010 L322 HSE with 80k miles that hasn't had any issues until the red Suspension System Inactive came on. The suspension immediately dropped to the bump stops and remained there since. This was preceded the day before with the amber Suspension System Fault that went away overnight. The next stop was an independent mechanic who has serviced the vehicle before since there is not a local deealership.


Two DTC codes came up when I checked the system:


C1130-66 (6C) Air spring air supply - Algorithm based failure - signal has too many transitions/events (amber warning light)


C1130-7A (2E) Air spring air supply - Mechanical failure - fluid leak or seal failure (red warning light)


The mechanic went over the suspension and said that the right front strut/air spring ($1,100 for non-OEM w/active dampening) is not holding air and needs to be replaced. He also said that there is a technical bulletin that recommends replacing the compressor relay, drier and delivery valve kit on the compressor to remedy the C1130-7A (2E) code. He said the kit itself is $1,200-$1,400, which doesn't sound right considering a whole new non-OEM compressor is available for $730 at Atlantic British. Labor for both is only a couple of hours and was reasonable.


Couple of questions:


1) Do the codes in parentheses above indicate where the fault was generated (6C) & (2E)? What do they mean or can you direct me to a resource that would tell me?


2) What are the chances that just replacing the front right strut clears both codes without the compressor rebuild? Mechanic didn't indicate that there is a problem with the compressor, only that he saw a TSB associated with the DTC code.


3) How difficult is it to fit the TSB kit or replace the compressor myself? Any new software needed or just a calibration using the GAP IID diagnostic tool?


I would not attempt to replace the strut/air spring myself because I have no access to a lift, among other things. I've done much of the routine maintenance on the vehicle and would consider working on items that don't require a lift.


I've owned this vehicle for a number of years and have been looking to sell/trade it this spring, so any advice to get the vehicle back into a condition to trade with the least amount of expense is appreciated.


Thanks,
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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309 Posts
I think your mechanic is referring to this bulletin:
https://www.rangerovers.net/forum/attachments/range-rover-sport-l320/8742d1330467182-c1130-air-spring-air-supply-ltb00269-4.pdf
I suspect the 2E is the real problem and the 6C is the “compensating” fault code. If leaking component has been identified, I’d address that and see if it fixes the problem. No need to replace additional components just yet, especially that the factory TSB requires an update to EAS control module and your mechanic will probably not be able to do it.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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For what it’s worth, filter, drier and pump rebuild kits are available for the older generation of EAS compressor for about $60 on eBay and the diy job took only an hour or so. My 07 RRSC gets to pressure noticeably quicker after the rebuild.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Wow, Land Rover really jams it to their customers deeply. 1200 to 1400 bucks for a 10 dollar control relay, a compressor outlet valve and a bag of desicant. All of that can't total more than 50 bucks in the real world., 1100 bucks for a non OE strut is also highway robbery, unless the strut itself is leaking oil, all you need is an airbag. Thats about $300 tops for a non OE bag, maybe 500 for an OE one.

Don't worry about the compressor parts until the leaking airbag is replaced, if the code is still present after that then you can deal with the compressor, as stated a rebuild kit for them is about 60 bucks and a couple of hours of your time if you've never had a tool in your hands.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Also, I don't think you need a lift to change an air bag, just jacks and stands. I think there are YouTube videos on this.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Fixed the known problem first by replacing just the front right air strut. Everything is holding pressure, compressor running fine and all codes cleared after a week. $900 out the door with a new strut assembly installed and warranty. If I were keeping the vehicle long term, I would probably go ahead and replace the other 3 air springs with the Arnott kits for peace of mind.

Thank you all.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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For what it's worth, I recently replace my two front strut assemblies. Initially I purchased a "cheaper" pair from a company I found off e-Bay (they also have a regular website) for ~$320. They both ended up being defective and leaking from where the bags meet the metal strut and plastic ring assembly thing. Fortunately the return was a non issue and went smoothly.

I ended up going with a pair from a company from Germany - aerosus.com - who has a nice guarantee and shipping policy. They are a little more expensive, but not quite as expensive as some of the other brands often mentioned here. Either way, I gotta say they are solid and well-built. I've installed them myself (which, for anyone reading that may be wondering, it's actually fairly easy imo) and am very happy with the performance and result. Would definitely recommend.
 
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