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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Hello, I think the alternator has failed on the families Rover. It had been whining a little for a few weeks and when driving it seemed as if the battery died and it starting freaking out. I made a video of the whine and the issues when it started dying. Quite sure it is the alternator not charging the battery.

I cannot seem to find any info about how to replace this alternator yourself and it looks like a pretty extensive job from just looking under the hood. Let me know if you think its the alternator and if anyone knows of a step-by-step on replacing the alternator yourself.

Thanks
 

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I'm not sure about the 5.0, I looked a little for you and it appears to be in roughly the same place as the 4.2L RR'. You'll need to first drop the splash shield, you'll need a 1/2" drive breaker bar or big ratchet to take the tension of the tensioner then slide the belt off the alternator. My procedure with the 4.2 was to then remove the coolant expansion tank/mount, remove the nut and power wire from the alt via engine bay... I'd then go under the car and unbolt the thing. I'd go back to the engine bay and lift/tilt the alternator so the back was facing up, unplug the harness, then shimmy it out where the expansion tank used to be. I'm not sure how the 5.0 is arrange, maybe there is more/less access. Maybe you can remove it from the bottom though it looks similarly mounted. Normally you'd want to test the voltage and confirm it's the alt, but since yours is clearly groaning it should probably get replaced regardless as that's probably your issue. I prefer sourcing things like alternator locally so if it doesn't test/work it can be returned quickly. I was able to grab mine at autozone under their lifetime warranty.
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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The alternator will come out through the lower front right "aperture" between the body and the subframe.

It's a tight squeeze but with a little trial and error in orientation it can be done.

With the engine running, raise the car to its tallest capable height. Install shop stands so that it doesn't sink down on you while you're working under the car.

Wait 15 minutes or so then disconnect the battery.

Grab an iPad or cellphone and take "before" pictures as your go along to help putting it all back together.

Plan on draining the coolant then remove the overflow tank (disconnect the hoses and low level sensor).

Remove the two lower trays and the passenger-side lower cover (if still fitted).

Using a 3/8 breaker bar release the tension on the belt tensioner and slip the belt off the water pump, then it'll be easier to take it off the alternator pulley.

There's a 13mm nut attaching the main power cable (cable covered with a heat resistant silver colored material) to the alternator and a small dark gray plug with a thin single wire towards the rear of the alternator. That particular plug can be a pain to remove.

Disconnect both - it's relatively easier with the coolant overflow reservoir removed but you may have to wait until the alternator is fully loose to access them the first time.

To remove the alternator there are two 13mm attach bolts at an angle into the side of the block, which you can remove from under the car, and a single 13mm bolt which is installed into the front face of the block.

Once they're removed, finally, there's a white harness clip which retains the alternator harness and needs to be popped off.

Now, you're ready to wiggle the alternator out through the right front aperture between the subframe and body.

Then, reverse the procedure with your new alternator.

Good luck.

Rob
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I was updating my previous post to add some additional info but timed out the original's editing window.

Here's a slightly more comprehensive review of the job you're considering....

The alternator will come out through the lower front right "aperture" between the body and the subframe on the 5.0.

It's a tight squeeze but with a little trial and error in orientation it can be done.

With the engine running, raise the car to its tallest capable height. Install some shop stands so that it doesn't sink down on you while you're working under the car.

Wait 15 minutes or so then disconnect the battery. It'll help if you disconnect the two hood supports and place the hood in the service position too.

Grab an iPad or cellphone and take "before" pictures as you go along to help in putting it all back together.

Remove the engine cover. Remove the air intake plenum by loosening the air cleaner to plenum hose clamps, pop the breather pipe on the driver's side of the plenum by squeezing the fitting at 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock towards the center to release it from the back side of the plenum.

Detach the 8mm black plastic hose which runs from the water pump to the overflow tank from its clip. Undo the large clamp which connects the plenum to the throttle body and, with the air cleaner hoses pried off their perches, gently pull the entire assembly towards the radiator and lift it up as it begins to rub on the fan shroud.

Remove the entire passenger side air box after detaching the MAP sensor five-pin multiplug connector or undoing the two screws which hold it in place if the connector is reluctant to simply unclip and pull off. The airbox is held in place by three large plastic prongs sitting in rubber cups so a sharp tug up first at the end closest to the engine then a tug towards the engine should release it. There are a couple of small harness clips which will need to be popped off before it can be fully removed.

Plan on draining the coolant then remove the overflow tank (disconnect the hoses and low level sensor).

Remove the two lower trays and the passenger-side lower cover (if still fitted).

Using a 3/8 breaker bar release the tension on the belt tensioner and slip the belt off the water pump, then it'll be easier to take the belt off the alternator pulley.

There's a 13mm nut attaching the main power cable (cable covered with a heat resistant silver colored material) to the alternator and a small dark gray plug with a thin single wire towards the rear of the alternator. That particular plug can be a pain to remove.

Disconnect both - it's relatively easier with the coolant overflow reservoir removed but you may have to wait until the alternator is fully loose to access them the first time.

To remove the alternator there are two 13mm attach bolts at an angle into the side of the block, which you can remove from under the car, and a single 13mm bolt which is installed into the front face of the block.

Once they're removed, finally, there's a white harness clip which retains the alternator harness and needs to be popped off.

Now, you're ready to wiggle the alternator out through the right front aperture between the subframe and body.

Then, reverse the procedure with your new alternator.

One caveat: I like to use the vacuum filling method when filling/replacing the coolant. It's a more reliable way to ensure that the cooling system is fully filled without trapping any air pockets.

Rob
 

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Thanks for the description as I think ours will be similar to change. I wanted to clean out our airbox but found that the nubs into the fender well did not want to release. I did get it to pop out of the lower point. Will also look for your method of filling cooking system to avoid air pockets. Thanks for the mention
 

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2011 Range Rover Supercharged
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Thanks for the description as I think ours will be similar to change. I wanted to clean out our airbox but found that the nubs into the fender well did not want to release. I did get it to pop out of the lower point. Will also look for your method of filling cooking system to avoid air pockets. Thanks for the mention
Also the center air box plenum is an extra VERY tight squeeze between the fan shroud when removing it on the S/C 5.0L due to the shape of the upper cast alum coolant crossover.

I’d also strongly recommend a vacuum coolant fill system. Cooling systems on luxury cars these days are so complex that traditional fill & bleed methods can be very time consuming and frustrating. For under $100 you can get a quality vacuum system for home shop use.
I use the OEM Tools 24444 system.
https://www.greatnecksaw.com/24444-airvac-coolant-refiller-oem.html
It is available on Amazon for $70-$80. The variety of included adapters work well on my whole fleet (BMW, Mercedes, Porsche and Range Rover).
 

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Excellent. Christmas present from my wife solved. When her range is running my life is much better.
 

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2011 Range Rover Supercharged
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When her range is running my life is much better.
Hahaha so true. The Range is my wife’s vehicle as well, so I know what you mean ?
 
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