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Hey all - I'm new to this forum and the RR world so bear with me.

I'm looking to buy this 2008 RRS with 61K miles on it. I've heard that the AJ8 engine has some issues (overheating, oil starvation issues, underdimensioned timing chain design) - and I've also heard that everyone has suspension airbag problems.

Would any of these be an issue on a 2008 with only 61K miles? Would I be able to drive it around for 20-30K miles without any major problems - other than regular maintenance (oil changes etc)?

At what point mileage wise generally do people start seeing a lot of maintenance issues? For example, I've owned some BMW's in the past, and I usually start seeing them go down hill after 90-100K miles.

Any input is appreciated, thanks!
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Well to start with it's a vehicle and all those things could go bad at any time or never fail you. Remember with Rovers you buy them cause you can't help yourself, you love them and take the issues as they come. A well maintained Rover will last longer and provide more satisfaction than any other vehicle. A poorly maintained Rover will leave you stranded no matter the milage. Yes there are noted points of failure on the L320 so a good inspection by a knowledgeable Rover tech is advisable. Best wishes and welcome to the forum.
 

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I have a 2008 RRS, but NOT supercharged. So I can't comment on the supercharger, which I understand can need rebuild after so many miles.
My RRS has 94,000 miles, and runs like a brand new vehicle. I should say, I always had the car dealer serviced, so that surely has helped. Just the last service, just a month ago, I went to an independent garage, and only b/c the Land Rover dealer no longer seems interested in servicing a 10 year old vehicle. Needed brake pads. Also, according to owner's manual which I always follow, due for radiator flush and transmission flush. Dealer kept saying, "why change transm. fluid, are you having problems"; to which I assured them no problems, just following manual, to which they responded, they never change after that many years and just let vehicle "run its course". So I just did those things at an independent shop. Like I said, car runs fantastic, better feel than a new vehicle, always has! I think 2008 was a good year. Just new tires, oil changes, follow manual. Only 2 problems are aesthetic: Headliner droop, and dash cracks. I bought a dash cover, looks great.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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I had an 08 SC unit with the 4.2L engine. Bullet proof. Much better than the 4.4 and the original 4.0 in the Jags. Had one of the few 05 LR3 with the 4.2 before they switched to the 4.4 (Jag needed the 4.2s for the X350 and S-types). Great motor.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover Sport
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I had an 08 RRS SC and the engine was bulletproof. Ran like a tank. When you stepped on the gas, it takes off. '08 IMHO after doing research when buying mine, was the first year of "working out the bugs" I think. I personally would not purchase one before '08 (so looking at statistics on line about reliability, engines, etc etc).

I think the Jag/LR motors get a bad rep, however, so long as they are maintained, they are as reliable as can be.
 

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I think MI2VA summarized it best. I had to change both front lower control arms, front wheel-hub bearing assemblies, all 4 height sensors and struts, cooling fan assembly, TPMS central control module, upgraded some suspension components as per service bulletins, and did some other minor things over the years. Engine and transmission are actually its strengths, not weaknesses. It has been the most satisfying vehicle I ever owned despite the work it required over the years. So, a well-maintained '08 SC with 60K miles may be the most satisfying vehicle you ever owned also, but be prepared to address issues if they arise.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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I had an 08 SC unit with the 4.2L engine. Bullet proof. Much better than the 4.4
Based on what issues are you saying the 4.2 was better than the 4.4?

The 4.4 engine was absolutely bullet proof, I put 200K miles on, never consumed a drop of oil...perfectly mated to the ZF transmission. Absolutely rock solid...

The 4.2 had more frequent issues with the oil intercooler being wired backwards from the factory (Reduced Performance error message). Once fixed, it was reliable...

The 2006/2007 engines were just as reliable as the 2008...in fact, was there actually any difference between them...I don't recall that specs were different until either 2009 or 2010...
 

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Agree - people seem to have more issues with supercharger before 100k- 4.4 seems to be solid to > 150k but there are no guarantees !

The zf transmisison also seems solid if you change the oil at 60k or so intervals. Same with transfer case. Early diffs had issues - by 2008 I think you should be ok - but also change fluid at 30-60k.

Air suspension has been mostly reliable - control arms probably need replacing at 60-80k - and I’ve had alternator issues at 10 years 90k.

Yeah - there can be other issues like sunroof leaks (easy fix) , misc electrical items , but mine has been better than previous bmw so far , not cheap (although if you can diy it is not too bad) and doesn’t need to go to dealer for a lot of routine work (local ammco shop could handle everything I couldn’t so far).

But it is not a Toyota - if that is what you are looking for ....
 

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Based on what issues are you saying the 4.2 was better than the 4.4?

The 4.4 engine was absolutely bullet proof, I put 200K miles on, never consumed a drop of oil...perfectly mated to the ZF transmission. Absolutely rock solid...

The 4.2 had more frequent issues with the oil intercooler being wired backwards from the factory (Reduced Performance error message). Once fixed, it was reliable...

The 2006/2007 engines were just as reliable as the 2008...in fact, was there actually any difference between them...I don't recall that specs were different until either 2009 or 2010...

I didn't mean to malign the 4.4 engine. I felt the 4.2 that I had in my 05 LR3 had more power than the 4.4, especially in drives over the West Virginia mountains from Va Bch to Cincinnati. the 05 engine was trouble free (only the EPB, LCAs, and electric suspension were a problem, all fixed under warranty). My first 08 LR3 was bought back by LRNA, it had a bad camshaft on left side after 18K miles; the 08 LR3 replacement was perfect after 60K miles; I replaced it with an 08 RRS/SC with the 4.2. Having been on this forum since 2011, I don't remember any engine issues with either of the early motors, unlike problems with the Jag 4.0 (had three of them; the secondary plastic tensioners and water pumps known failure points). Most of the issues were with the supercharger, with the brake switch, leaking moonroofs, and idiots insisting on putting 24" tires . . .

The 5.0l had some issues up to 2013 (water pump, noisy fuel pumps, fans, tensioners), but my 2013 was excellent (except I never got used to the noisy fuel pump).

That all said: I would recommend any of the the JAG V8 products I have owned. But the 2001 XJ8L is the one I miss the most.
 

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You're right Jhartz...going back in my memory banks to the 2006-2009 offerings, I believe the 4.2 SC had 375 hp and the 4.4 had 300 hp...so that would make sense for more power! Someone correct me if my stats are off..

Which is also why I am enjoying my 2013 V8 at 375 hp...last of the V8's...velvety smooth with the added power...having enjoyed that V8 rumble for so many years, it was a mental reduction to step to the SC/ V6...maybe sometime in the future.

I only wish I had had the chance to drive the TDV8 Diesel version here in the U.S.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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I recommend completely checking the cooling system. We found some weird white residue and if we had done everything at the time we would have save a headache or two. As others have said, wondeful vehicle, wife refuses to let it go. If you want more power thats pretty easy. But do the cooling system first. I’ve pretty much replaced everything in the suspension at this point. All fluids. Almost everything in the engine bay save the block and intetnals - heads, yes. Wife drives the BigWhiteBison daily, and we use it for all our long trips all over the US and Canada.
 

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The 4.2 SC was 390 hp.
It was not an oil intercooler but a water pump for the W2A intercooler connected in reverse on some early vehicles. The TSB with affected VIN range is widely available, it's also a 5-minute job to check and 10 minutes job to fix the issue (the pump is under the LHD drivers' side headlamp, behind the bumper), should it not be fixed by now, should the actual vehicle actually be affected.

Due to the decreased size (in favour of additional strengthening of the block) of the 4.2 compared to 4.4, the former is actually even more robust than the latter and would cope with power levels of 600hp+ easily, if the transmission was able to withhold that (it's not, at least not for prolonged use).

The engine is very durable. However, it may exhibit the same issue that affects early 5.0 engines with the bolts holding the timing chain becoming flexible and allowing the chain slides to move on load. This leads to valve close events happening in an untimely (premature) manner. There is no risk of valves hitting the pistons, but engine becomes hesitant, especially at low revs and a check engine light with codes "Lean on bank 1, 2" and "misfire on cylinder #..." is displayed. A chain/bolt/slider kit that is interchangeable between the AJV8 4.2SC and 4.4 n/a is a definitive fix, but it is a fairly complicated procedure involving some front-end disassembly.

Otherwise, it is a marvellous car, two things that annoyed me was lack of any reasonable and contemporary way of integrating my iPods with the built-in stereo and the rear hatch window that stopped working eventually (and it wasn't the switch, but the wiring between the body and the hatch, the ultimate PITA to fix.)
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Good catch Wojtek on the HP for the S/C! :)

On the Ipod integration, there was a very nice cradle both for both Ipod Nano and standard Iphone 4/5 or SE which worked just fine easily mounted just to the left of the middle left vent, and integrated via wiring to the radio, with extra jacks in the glove box for USB and RF jacks, allowed operation of the Ipod thru the steering wheel buttons. I had that installed practically since day 1 and worked all the way up to the Iphone SE...but form factors after that got a little large for the cradle. Worked perfectly for 11 years...still being used by the current owner I sold the 2006 RRS to as well.
 

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Whoa, that'd be a cool thingy, I really craved for a full integration (touchscreen playlists, steering wheel controls etc) with the stereo though. This is, sadly, a MY2010+ thing...
 

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I've also heard that everyone has suspension airbag problems.
They are not "problems". EAS bags are a wear item just like tyres and brakes. They require replacement when they wear out.
 

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Good point Wojtek. A great deal of folks easily go 100k miles on original struts. Just like tyres, the rubber air bag will age differently in different climates. If you are in an arid region you need to be parking in wading mode once or twice a year and spraying your bags down with silicon. In regions where salt is used in winter you need to park in wading mode and clean up those bags when you clean the rest of your undercarriage each spring. The salt will dry out the EAS rubber just like your bushings, brake lines and tie rod ends.
 
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