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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
I’m in need of some help. 99k miles on my 07 RRSC. I’m getting code P2097 and P2099. Post Catalyst Fuel Trim System too rich Bank 1 and 2.

I’ve replaced the spark plugs, PCV valve twice, replace PCV hose, checked for leaks in intake, cleaned MAF, cleaned intake, cried, cursed, BG44k x3, on and on....

If the vehicle sits for more than three or four hours a plume of blue smoke comes out of the tailpipes when I start. Replaced the PCV twice already and no changes, replaced the PCV hose as well and no changes.

Any suggestions on what else to do?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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18 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
I've taken the intake, SC, charge air coolers, and valve covers off. Whole intake system is pretty nasty with an oily gunk all over everything. I didn't see any intake leaks. Valve cover PCV baffle appears to be full of sludge and gunk.

Has anyone had any issues with this stuff clogging up before? I'm considering a catch can to prevent this crap from going back into the engine.

Also does anyone know of a cross for fuel injector O-Rings. I can't get anything local in the time frame I need and don't want to risk a leak.
 

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Posrover, Did you get the P2099 figured out? I had that and the cat converter codes. Replaced the cats and those codes are not reappearing but the P2099 has come back on. Also replaced my front (upstream) o2 sensors.

Thanks.

Bill
 

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Something to consider here, guys, is the fact that blue smoke is oil burning, not rich mixtures. What typically happens as an engine ages is that the valve seals begin to leak, causing oil burning under high vacuum conditions. These will typically reveal themselves as blue smoke or haze at startup. Now to the 2099 codes.
P2099 codes are related to the post cat fuel trims being excessively rich. There are basically two possibilities here. One is the fuel injectors delivering too much fuel. This can be the result of excessive fuel pressure, leaking injectors, or changes in the fuel trims causing excessive delivery.
The other possibility is the air the engine sees at cold start. The computer is programmed to deliver a fixed amount of fuel at start up and during open loop, when the O2 is not being used to monitor mixtures. If, for any reason, insufficient air is being delivered to the engine, the mixtures will be rich. This can include insufficient idle air control or IAC opening, dirty passages in the throttle body, or incorrect settings of the minimum air rate. Issues with throttle position sensors, which will confuse the computer can also contribute to this. We can go deepeer, but let's start there. I don't want to bury anyone in info, but have more to offer. Let us know... Ray
 
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