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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
My 2006 RRSC has been sitting in my driveway for the past couple of months connected to a trickle charger. When I was looking at it today via my security cameras, it looks like it lowered a little bit (my Tacoma is parked in front of it so I can tell it's a little lower relatively as I'm used to seeing the RR sitting quite a bit higher than my Taco). However, I don't think it's lowered all the way to the bump stops based on the picture.

Does this look normal for a 2006 RRSC that has been sitting for a couple of months?

I'm planning on visiting my house late January to check the house and the vehicles over.

IMG_3348.jpg
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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688 Posts
Air suspension like tires lose pressure over time. My P38 loses air when sitting for over a week.
And yes, it looks like you’re just about on bump stops.


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Considering your location and temps dipping below freezing at night, totally normal.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #5
Update: I finally got home to Boise after being gone for 3 months. The 06 RRSC has been on a trickle charger and settled all the way down on it's suspension.
Before:
IMG_3348.jpg
After:
IMG_3182.jpg

After I got home and disconnected the trickle charger, she started right up. No error codes. Within 30 seconds the compressor kicked in and raised the truck to the appropriate level. I drove her around all day to make sure all was good. Now back to the trickle charger for a couple of more months of hibernation.

Thanks to everyone for their feedback.
 

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Update: I finally got home to Boise after being gone for 3 months. The 06 RRSC has been on a trickle charger and settled all the way down on it's suspension.
Before:
View attachment 270144
After:
View attachment 270146

After I got home and disconnected the trickle charger, she started right up. No error codes. Within 30 seconds the compressor kicked in and raised the truck to the appropriate level. I drove her around all day to make sure all was good. Now back to the trickle charger for a couple of more months of hibernation.

Thanks to everyone for their feedback.

If at all possible I'd have someone run out and start it weekly.
 

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2013-2015 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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166 Posts
do not, you will do more damage that way. car needs to be run to a full working temperature-including transmission, to do any good.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Not recommended. I did that with a ragtop over the winter in the garage. Ran it till up to temp each time. In the spring pulled it out and found the mufflers had rotted out from inside, due to moisture. Unless you really push some air thru the exhaust, it will leave to much water in it. If you were to run it around town that would get rid of all of it vs just from the driveway/garage. You really need to get the cats hot enough.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Need to get the oil up to operating temperature as well. Cold oil coursing through oil galleys of hot metal is like a cold soda can during a hot summer day. It gets condensation and needs to run long enough to boil some of it off and keep contamination down to a minimum.


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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Need to get the oil up to operating temperature as well. Cold oil coursing through oil galleys of hot metal is like a cold soda can during a hot summer day. It gets condensation and needs to run long enough to boil some of it off and keep contamination down to a minimum.
Haha, that's a good analogy. I'll have to keep that in mind.
 

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Not recommended. I did that with a ragtop over the winter in the garage. Ran it till up to temp each time. In the spring pulled it out and found the mufflers had rotted out from inside, due to moisture. Unless you really push some air thru the exhaust, it will leave to much water in it. If you were to run it around town that would get rid of all of it vs just from the driveway/garage. You really need to get the cats hot enough.
Never heard that one... I run my cars that sit usually weekly in the winter and it has NEVER been an issue... Get fluid pumping around, rotating components lubricated, etc etc. This practice started after letting cars sit, they just go bad if you don't start them.
 
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