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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
I usually do most car repairs myself. My Dad was an Mechanical Engineer and owned an Automotive Machine Shop up until I was a teenager (mid-eighties). He continued working on all types of Exotic Cars even after he sold the machine shop, and took a corporate engineering job.

I was a having a problem with the Air Conditioning in my 2006 Range Rover Supercharged. It would start blowing cold when i first started the car, but would get warm when I started driving. I thought clutch was engaging, and could hear and was pretty sure I visually could see it engage. I put my manifold gauges on stem, and pressures seemed correct and didn't fluctuate.

I suspected Compressor was failing, but wasn't sure. I'm a Professional Musician, and I have a Guitar Student who is a Diesel Mechanic, I mentioned the problem I was having diagnosing A/C. He told me a friend he works with had worked at Range Rover Dealer for 10 years, and was shop foreman. He even has the RR Testbook and other diagnostic equipment.

I called the guy, and he agreed to look at my RR. I took it over to his house, and after a visual inspection he determined the compressor was bad. He said if I bought parts he would install for $500. He mentioned the RR Labor Book estimated at close to 20 hours, but he could do it in 5 hours. I don't make anywhere near $100 per hour, but I was excited to get my Range Rover back on the road, and super busy with work. I decided to pay for the repair instead of doing it myself.

It took him about 2 weeks to do the repair. He called me and said there is another problem. The Air Conditioning isn't working because the car is getting slightly hotter than normal temperature, and Engine Computer is turning A/c off. He says a new waterpump will fix this problem. He will do the install for $300.

I think I should probably do this myself, and save money. I don't want to drive car with bad waterpump, and having it trailer would add expense. I tell him to go ahead and do it.... I just want the car back.

A week later he calls me, and says the Waterpump didn't fix it. He believes the head gasket is bad. He brings home tester from work, and it verifies Combustion Gas in coolant. He recommends a replacement engine. He says Head Gasket repair is high on parts & labor, and often only short term fix.

I 'm not sure if this is normal procedure of things because I do 99% of my own repairs. I feel like a mechanic with his level of experience should have known to check for major problem before doing all these repairs? I basically spent $1500 doing repairs engine with blown head gasket. I don't think there was any problem with A/C Components. Not sure about Waterpump.

The Engine Temperature Gauge had never moved from the middle. I never saw any indication of overheating, or getting hot.

I'm looking for advice.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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I think I would get it back. He's throwing parts at it with your money. If the temperature gauge has never moved off of the middle position and you have driven it enough to know that, its probably not overheating, or putting exhaust gases into the coolant.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Mark! The mechanic mentioned that the Temp Gauge in the car is basically an "idiot gauge." He said that it really doesn't move until you get over 280 degrees, and then your in big trouble. I looked through the RAVE trying to find specs, but couldn't find anything.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Its an anaolog gauge from a thermister on the back of the thermostat housing. In other words it moves up and down based on the coolant temperature. Bottom of the gauge is about 104F. Middle of the gauge is about 195F, line above is about 235F, and the line below is about 160F. The red zone starts around 250F, and ends at 284F. Now I'm sure i would get it back if he knows RR's but doesn't even know the temperature gauge is an actual meter not an idiot light. If the gauge starts out low on the left side when its cold, and climbs to the middle of the gauge and stays there while your driving thats exactly what its supposed to do. You will get a COOLANT TEMPERATURE message under the speedometer and tachometer on the dash along with a warning chime if coolant temp gets to 266F, no matter what the gauge says. If you make it to the high end of the gauge you have way bigger issues than a non functional A/C system.

I can't find anything that says the A/C compressor will shutdown on a high coolant temperature (makes sense that it would) only thing I can find that will stop the compressor when its in A/C mode is the evaporator temp lower than 36F, battery voltage >than 16V for 5 seconds, refrigerant pressure <27psi, or greater than 480psi, engine speed <400 RPM, and the interior blower fan is not running. If there is a high engine coolant temperature shutdown it would be up in the 250F range, probably right around the low end of the red zone on the gauge.
 

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Wow, you're getting taken for a pretty good ride there. Stop dealing with this guy and get it to an independent. Also the AC compressor is the simplest thing ever, it'll either need to be leaking or making a horrific noise for it not to be working. If the clutch snaps on and the unit is spinning, it's charged and the AC still isn't working the problem is elsewhere. How do you even get combustion gas in the coolant? What does that even mean? LOL If there is an opening in the system you'll either be loosing coolant or you wont. Guy sounds like a thief.
 

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It can happen if you have a failed head gasket, or a cracked block, combustion gases get pushed thru the crack and into the water jacket and ends up in the radiator expansion tank. Neither of which the Jag engines are known for. You would be adding coolant and/or having the expansion tank cap leaking as it got over pressurized with combustion gases if either was the case. Again, if you have owned the car for a while, put a good number of miles on it and it has never overheated on you I think its highly unlikely you have any head gasket issues.
 

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Can tell this guy used to work at an RR dealer!!! Throwing someone else’s money at the problem is my experience of dealers. Get it back and find a good independent.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #9
I was finally able to get me RR towed. It starts and runs without any problems. The RR Dealer mechanic showed me some things that seem to indicate high pressure in the cooling system. The Expansion tank has a hole in the top, and the little y connector has hole. He said indicated the high pressure of cooling system. There is also a cooling leak under the Intake that isn't visible. Mechanic said its the complicated design hose, and supercharger & intake need to be removed to repair. He also said the original water-pump was plastic and impeller was broken. Unfortunately he disposed of the old part before I arrived. He also mentioned that the Tempature sending unit could possibly be broken, because temp gauge never moved from middle.

I have a close friend who owns a small dealership that specializes in exotic cars. He referred me to an indy shop that will evaluate my RR. I will keep everyone posted on updates.
 

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The heater feed and return lines do pass under the intake manifold to get from the right rear corner of the engine to the thermostat housing and a fitting on the top front of the engine block. Not a real tough job to get the manifold off, but probably pretty time consuming. The hoses are all prebent so you would need to order them from somewhere. How many miles on the truck, LR recommends replacing all the hoses around 100K miles. I'm probably living on borrowed time with my 4.4L at 185K, and no records of whether or not any previous owner did them. I got mine at 113K, and so far only one of the heater hoses has failed, and I think it was a wear thru from rubbing instead of just deteriorating.

Are the holes in the "Y" fitting and expansion tank, holes or cracks along a seam. They may be just old age, they do get brittle. The cap should have relieved any pressure over about 12 psi before the tank or other fittings cracked from pressure. Guess it could happen but it would be strange.
 

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20180925_195724.jpg


Here Is picture of Expansion Tank the little Y fitting isnt clear in picture, but is just a few inches from Expansion tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The Indie Shop my friend recommended called and said "Engine is ruined." The said it looks like some type of head gasket seal had been previously been added to engine. They weren't specific as to how they could tell. My RR has around 150,000 miles currently. It had 144,000 when i purchased it a few years ago. I have a Camry that is my daily driver.

I'm on the hunt for replacement engine. I'll keep everyone posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I found a salvage engine its purchased and will be delivered to shop for install later this week.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi Everyone,

I wanted to come back and update the progress on my 2006 RR SC. I wanted to do this because I often see posts where the original poster has a laundry list of problems looking for help, but doesn't come back to share the solution.

I bought a used salvage engine. I made sure to find an engine from a similar time period to make the swap easier. I had it done a local indie shop. I picked it up yesterday, and runs great. I am getting a PO171 and PO174 codes. I'm trying to hunt down the cause of these problems. I already tried cleaning MAF, and a few other easy fixes.
 

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2008 Range Rover L322 HSE
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I’m new to the l322 series of rovers but also have a 96 and a 2000. I’m pretty sure the 171 and 174 are a lean condition, could be an o2 sensor unplugged/bad or since you just installed a new motor it’s possible a vacuum line didn’t get plugged in or incorrectly plugged in.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have checked for vacuum leaks, and exhaust leaks. The shop also checked. If I reset the CEL I notice I get the code under hard acceleration. I din't get these codes with old engine. Surprisingly the CEL didn't come on even thought it had a bad head-gasket. I'm still leaning toward Vacuum leak. I think it could also be fuel injector related, PCV... lots of possible causes.
 

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The O2 sensors may just be contaminated with coolant, if the original leak was bad enough to blow white smoke. Those codes come from the upstream sensors, the ones closest to the engine and your getting both of them together, so it is probably an intake leak, or vacuum leak after the MAF (which would include an old worn out PCV valve). Check the condition of the air intake silencers (those two little box shaped things on the intake tube just after the MAF or on a S/C engine its the 90 degree bend peice with all the little tubes sticking out to the right side of the truck), they can get cracked, or just leak at the seams, and their gaskets can get displaced when you put the tube back together.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks Mark C. I didn't know to check the air intake silencer. The PCV on my old engine was replaced a bout a month before it died. I might try swapping it. The exhaust was never blowing white smoke. The engine ran great, and I didn't get any check engine lights. The A?C wouldn't work, and the Coolant had such high pressure it blew a hole in the overflow reservoir. I'm hoping that my O2 sensors are ok, but I'll replace them if needed. The Intake was removed and new gaskets were used on replacement engine. The salvage yard cut the harness pulling the engine. This added unnecessary expense.
 
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