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Hello “friends”...I am new to this forum and recently purchased an 06 Sport HSE with 140,000 miles. I am getting a suspension fault; normal height only. I can not raise or lower the suspension, special systems are not available.

Using the touch screen 4x4 settings it shows what appears to be white “—“ indicators above each tire, not sitting on top of tire, but above a little. Indicators at each wheel are orange in color. I drove around the block while monitoring the screen and in the upper section, it jumps from “standard to raising” when the vehicle experiences a bump or irregularity in road surface. See attached photo - have short video, but can’t figure out to post. I’d be happy to email to someone if it would help. Plan to take to a shop Monday, but this is my first EAS issue, have owned others Rovers without EAS and don’t not want to be totally ignorant and taken for a ride! HELP please....
 

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The fault light indicates when the air suspension system cannot be charged. There are two common causes. Either the air pump/compressor is not working, or you have a leak somewhere in the system.

Given the mileage on your vehicle, I'd look first at the air compressor. I have a 2008 RRS and mine failed around 120K miles. I believe Land Rover has redesigned the compressor to address known weaknesses of the original units and the cost is around $700 for the replacement unit. There are also aftermarket suppliers with units around $500.

I never repaired mine and replaced the struts with common coil-over units to simplify the suspension system. I purchased a kit from Atlantic British that included a plug-in to eliminate the fault reading and a device to re-flash the system.
 

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Thanks for the feedback — if my compressor is bad, and if it appears air shocks are aged and showing signs of possible issues, and could go out fairly soon, I will replace with coil-overs - that’s a no-brainer for me. Question: How is the ride and drive with the coil-over change??? Still nice I would hope?
 

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Thanks for the feedback — if my compressor is bad, and if it appears air shocks are aged and showing signs of possible issues, and could go out fairly soon, I will replace with coil-overs - that’s a no-brainer for me. Question: How is the ride and drive with the coil-over change??? Still nice I would hope?
AB has two options for conversion to coils. One is firmer than the other and presumably is the better option if you are towing with your vehicle. I went with the standard or less-firm option and am very satisfied with the results.

You may also see improvement in your high-speed control. The struts can start to go bad after 100K+ miles. I didn't really notice it when driving around town. However, when hitting rough pavement at 70 mph and above, it would transmit a lot of the impact through to the frame versus absorbing it. Vehicle control improved in those circumstances after replacing the shocks/struts.

I'd also suggest that if you are considering replacing the struts, that you evaluate the condition of your ball joints and bushings at the same time, assuming you have not already done this. They are probably approaching failure as well, and I believe it may ultimately be more economical for you to replace them at the same time since both involve disassembly of some of the same suspension components.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good stuff - Thx. Last question for now - I’ve read about a real that could have failed? Where are the relays for the suspension/compressor?
 

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Good stuff - Thx. Last question for now - I’ve read about a real that could have failed? Where are the relays for the suspension/compressor?
Not positive, but I believe all of the relays are co-located with the fuses behind the lower glove box.

This may help in your diagnosis. Does your fault light come on simultaneously when starting the vehicle, or does it come on after approximately a minute? If the latter, it is probably a system leak. If immediately, then probably the relay or otherwise electrically-related.

In the case of a delay in the fault appearing, that occurs because the compressor has a safety that automatically shuts it down when it is unable to reach a target operating pressure. Otherwise, the pump would run continuously and ultimately burn itself out.
 

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Good stuff - Thx. Last question for now - I’ve read about a real that could have failed? Where are the relays for the suspension/compressor?
Not positive, but I believe all of the relays are co-located with the fuses behind the lower glove box.

This may help in your diagnosis. Does your fault light come on simultaneously when starting the vehicle, or does it come on after approximately a minute? If the latter, it is probably a system leak. If immediately, then probably the relay or otherwise electrically-related.

In the case of a delay in the fault appearing, that occurs because the compressor has a safety that automatically shuts it down when it is unable to reach a target operating pressure. Otherwise, the pump would run continuously and ultimately burn itself out.
Correction to the above. The relay is located in the fuse panel box in the engine compartment adjacent to the battery.

Follow this link: https://www.arnottindustries.com/products/land-rover-air-suspension/range-rover-sport/l320-chassis-excl-supercharged/2008/p-3431-arnott-new-air-suspension-compressor-05-09-land-rover-discovery-lr3-10-16-lr4-l319-06-13-range-rover-sport-l320

In the Installation Resources tab, there is a PDF you can download. See figure 4 in Step 2.
 

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I had the same issue, it was the compressor. If its the compressor, I rebuilt my compressor with the kit for less than 70$, been fine after that. Filters were bad and all, and needed a cleaning.
 

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Back story - this is the first RR I’ve owned in about 11 years. Shop I used to use is closed, owner retired. This RRS I bought last week in Florida had been sitting almost a year. I flew down, bought it, drove it from Maimi to Greensboro (879 miles) without any issue — she seems really comfortable at about 84mph! Settles in nicely.

An update — So...I did a google search this weekend as an attempt to identify an Indy Rover repair shop in my area, got a few names. Called one asked some questions, talked a little, and well.......never took the time to drive across town to let them look at it! Enuff said! Called a second shop and on the way there, I stopped in at my long time other vehicles Indy mechanic as I needed to schedule an oil change and state inspection for my Caddy - while there, I said, “hey Scott....you know anything about RR air suspensions?” He said, “I know a little, but Joe knows a lot and has worked on tons of em, before coming here, he has all the diagnostic programs and everything....Why?”

Well - here we go, off to the races! Pulled the Sport into Joes bay and the fun began. His diagnostic program was cool to watch - he could raise, lower, turn off, turn on........and oh yea, isolate specific issues. Really cool !!

Long story short (too late) - Compressor is bad, as well as LR air shock leaking. RF is looking questionable and weak, as well as a ride height sensor arm looking thing.

I’m a no non-sense kind of guy....Asked Joe if he’s comfortable taking out the EAS and going back with coil/springs. He said, “I’ve done several - max 2.5 - 3 hours for the front, maybe 2 hours for the rear”....I’m a long time customer of Scott’s, I asked him if he’s cool if I order the kit from AB and ship it to his shop — he said, that’s fine, get it ordered — he’s a Panthers PSL / Season ticket owner and so are we - Carolina Panthers fans look out for each other !! Ha ha.

So - hopefully by this weekend, I’ll be cruising on shocks and springs, ready to tailgate on September 8th! (Panthers vs Rams) I’ll keep you updated and appreciate my first experience with this forum.

Cheers
 

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AB has two options for conversion to coils. One is firmer than the other and presumably is the better option if you are towing with your vehicle. I went with the standard or less-firm option and am very satisfied with the results.

You may also see improvement in your high-speed control. The struts can start to go bad after 100K+ miles. I didn't really notice it when driving around town. However, when hitting rough pavement at 70 mph and above, it would transmit a lot of the impact through to the frame versus absorbing it. Vehicle control improved in those circumstances after replacing the shocks/struts.

I'd also suggest that if you are considering replacing the struts, that you evaluate the condition of your ball joints and bushings at the same time, assuming you have not already done this. They are probably approaching failure as well, and I believe it may ultimately be more economical for you to replace them at the same time since both involve disassembly of some of the same suspension components.

In my opinon, it is best to purchase a iland diagnostic tool app for your car.. this will help you troubleshoot codes and avoid the expensive repairs by land rover and even some mechanics.
 

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Since I'm weighed down with extra I went with the lifted coils from AB can barely tell difference on road. Been n about a year now have yet to wheel this set up.

For diagnostic tools also check out the Gap Diagnostics IID tool.
 

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One of the best things with these cars is the air suspension which is quite simple if you take the time to learn about it.

Coils on a RRS is a waste.

Garry
 

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Discussion Starter #15
One of the best things with these cars is the air suspension which is quite simple if you take the time to learn about it.

Coils on a RRS is a waste.

Garry
Garycol - Appreciate your feedback. May I ask, why exactly do you feel “coils on a RRS is a waste”? What is about the air suspension that makes it one of the best features?
 

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Garycol - Appreciate your feedback. May I ask, why exactly do you feel “coils on a RRS is a waste”? What is about the air suspension that makes it one of the best features?
While I appreciate that many think the RRS is just a Soccer Mum's Car and will never go offroad, it was designed to be one of the most capable 4wds straight off the showroom floor (with better tyres).

Part of this ability is the TR system and the air suspension - the air suspension allows me to drive down the motor way with the suspension low for better onroad handling but when I go offroad I can jack it up to get great offroad clearance.

Likewise when on the bitumen the air suspension is nothing special as far as ride goes but get on the gravel with all the corrugations or offroad the suppleness of the suspension comes into its own and you don't get shaken to pieces.

The base models of the LR3 was sold with standard coils and not a lot sold as the air suspension models were always preferred.

The EAS is a simple system and works well but there is a bit of mystery about that means some mechanics can convince some owners that the EAS is too hard to work on and it is easier to change to coils so loosing one of the best assets of these vehicles. If nothing else, I can get into low carparks when I have my roof rack on and my 91yo mum can get in and out of the car without assistance.

Really without the EAS the vehicle is just another X5 or Q7 - boring.

But it is not my car and each to their own.

I hope you enjoy the modified vehicle.

Garry
 

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All very valid points Garry, and I totally respect your opinion. My “mum” is also 91, and when I take her out and about, which sadly is getting few and far between, she enjoys the Caddy, as she drove them for years and it’s like an old pair of shoes - comfortable for her. I don’t do a lot of off road any more, but on occasion when we do, we break out the old FJ60.....We won’t get into one vs the other, but it does a fine job and turns heads.

Cheers my friend -
 

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+1

I think it's a matter of how much you value the air suspension features versus the simplicity/dependability of coils. I thought the air suspension was really cool when I first got the RRS and found it super convenient. Over time, I found myself fiddling with it less and less. I have RS sliders which provide a low enough step for whomever hops in the RRS. Personally, I've only had a handful of times where lowering the vehicle mattered - and that's with the BajaRack. It's not a huge deal for me to find another parking garage I can fit in. On the other hand, I'm way more concerned with a suspension fault lowering me to bump stops and having to drive all the way home like that. If you've had to do that before, you know what I mean.

If you keep the air setup, you'll want to invest in a tool like GAP IID or LLAMS to give you even more flexibility.
 
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