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2005 Range Rover HSE (4.6is Engine Swap)
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Hey everyone! I'm new to this forum, but am coming over from several BMW forums where I've done some fun engine/drivetrain swaps on my other BMWs, but now am working on a unique Range Rover project. I say unique since as far as I can tell, nobody has yet tried to swap a X5 4.6is engine into one of the early Mk3s. I do know that several people have done X5 4.4 engine swaps, so I'm a little surprised that nobody has attempted this before. In any case, I started this project last summer and have been updating my thread on bimmerforums, but will copy over what I've done here and continue them both as I go forward.

I'm at it again with another swap project. This one is a slight bit unconventional and a bit unique, even for me
. Last November or so, I was given the opportunity to buy a 2005 Range Rover with the M62TU in it for an absolute steal, though it did come with some complications of course. The car is in pretty good condition for the most part, but will need some paint correction and possibly even some paint in a couple places, but the interior is in very good shape and the leather still feels nice and soft. It has 124k miles on it and I got it from Texas, but it appears to have lived in Virginia for a time as well. I haven't done a full history on it to know for sure though.



So, how did I get it so cheap? Well, the PO said he had a radiator hose burst on it and he thinks it overheated and blew a head gasket or possibly warped the heads or both. He said he shut it off before it overheated too bad, but he said he did a compression test and it failed. Ended up having it shipped to my friend Denise's house as she had a few M62TUs that she wanted to learn how to do work on so she could practice with mine. Shipping cost more than the car, just to give you a hint on what I paid for it. It basically sat there for nearly 7-8 months as we both had a bunch of projects and didn't have time to work on it.

After selling my 530it6 wagon and my 330Ci and my 540itA in the last several months, I had some money and time to consider working on the Range Rover, so I trailered it back to my house. At the same time, I also talked with a friend of mine, purplecty, who had a friend local to him with a 4.6is engine out of his X5 and would be willing to make a great deal. It has 120k miles on it and has had the guides done about 3 years/15k miles ago, so I decided to scoop it up. The plan is to swap over the oil pan and wiring harness from the Land Rover M62TU to the 4.6is M62TU and swap it in. In theory, it should be a pretty simple swap as I've read about others doing a 4.4 X5 engine swap into a Range Rover without much trouble.

Some of you might be asking how to make the electronics work. Well, first I will tell you that while the DME is a ME7.2 from Bosch, the BMW software tools don't like the software on it and you can't even really read error codes properly with it. I was able to read out the tune from Galletto and I spoke with Dima at DUDMD Tuning and he was able to not only transfer the 4.6is mappings to the Land Rover DME, but he also did a performance tune on it as well. Since it's the original DME, I shouldn't need any EWS deletes or anything like that. If anyone is considering this swap in the future (I know, it's a longshot, LOL), they should definitely talk to him about making the DME work.

So yesterday, I decided to start disassembling the engine a bit to see what refresh parts I would need to order for it. this includes things like oil pan gaskets, valley pan service kit (doesn't appear to have been done before), timing cover and vanos gaskets (either failed due to aftermarket gaskets or reused the originals), valve cover gaskets (apparently Victor Reinz don't hold up well), front and rear crankshaft seals, belts, tensioners, and spark plugs.




Not too bad looking under the valve covers.

This project will be updated kind of sporadically for a bit as I've also got the S54 swapped 530i project and getting a lift installed in the garage going on, so this comes after all that. I may pepper in some engine refreshing in between though.

June 20, 2020

So, got to work on the M62TUB46 this weekend and got a pretty decent bit done, but we're not really in a hurry, so it's kind of nice to just take our time with it.

Started on the valley pan since it was pretty easy to get to with the intake off already. After that, we moved on to the coolant passage gasket on the back of the engine, along with the crossover pipe gaskets and o-rings for the coolant pipes that go over the valley pan. Then we cleaned the valley really well as it had a bunch of corrosion and crud built up.



Next we moved on to the rear main seal replacement. I'm glad we are going to be pulling the upper and lower oil pans as well as we couldn't get the bolts that go into the rear main seal housing to start. We are hoping that once the oil pan is off we can get those to line up properly.



Finally we decided to take off some of the accessories that we'll be swapping over anyways and get to cleaning the tons of grime off the engine. We got to work with some Gunk Heavy Duty Gel and some nylon brushes and scotch brite pads for some of the nooks and crannies. I think it came out pretty decent. Not perfect, but it will do and looks a whole lot better than it did.





We took the A/C compressor off and won't be using it since the bearings in it sound shot. The water cooled alternator won't be used either as the casing on the front had what appeared to be either RTV or JB Weld around the pulley and the one on the Range Rover motor is in much better shape. I'm hoping we can keep the A/C system connected when we swap the engine to keep from having to get it recharged later. I've got all new tensioners and belts to go on. Power steering pump will be taken from the other engine as well. Maybe we'll start moving over some of the accessories from the other engine before taking the engine out just to make it go a bit quicker, but who knows. Might be easier to just wait for the engine to be out.

Still need to change the timing cover gaskets, valve cover gaskets and send the valve covers out for powder coating. I found a shop here in Charlotte that can media blast and powder coat them both in wrinkle black for $320, so that will be sweet. They've done a ton of these VCs before and know how to prep them properly.

Overall, it was a nice Saturday and I'm so glad to see the engine all cleaned up.

July 24, 2020

Kind of a small update on the project over the last few weekends. Sent the valve covers off to get powdercoated in wrinkle black, which came back looking pretty good. I had a local shop in Charlotte do the powdercoating. The magnesium valve covers tend to get lots of pits and flaking metal shavings with age, so the wrinkle coating helps to mask a lot of that, but they will never be perfect.

I also had to order some new valve cover gaskets as I'd somehow forgotten them in my last few orders.

Went ahead and did the front crank seal, which wasn't too terribly difficult, though it was fun trying to take the "Jesus Bolt" off. A MAP gas torch and an air impact gun made decent work of it. A standard seal puller removed the old seal and a 54mm socket worked well enough to get the new seal tapped in. Haven't torqued the new crank bolt yet though as it will need the crank held and I don't have a flywheel or transmission on, so not sure the best way to do that. Might have to wait till it's back in the car.

It's basically to the point where it's ready for accessories to be swapped over from the Range Rover engine, so I need to start removing some of those if I can from the car, but it might be easier to just wait till I have the lift in the garage and roll the chassis in to do that. Just depends on how bored I get and how much time I have to do it
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November 14, 2021

Hey guys! I finally got started on the Range Rover 4.6is swap project today.

Rolled it into the shop this morning and we started pulling the engine. We had already pulled the intake, valve covers and unplugged a bunch of the wiring before, so some work was already done, but this one went a bit different than any of my previous swaps as it is an AWD setup and according to the Range Rover service manual, it's preferable to pull the engine out the top instead of dropping the whole thing out the bottom. This meant unbolting the struts from the knuckles, removing the axles, and unbolting the auto transmission from the engine before lifting the engine out. Fortunately, this car was a Texas car and doesn't have a clue what rust is, so everything actually came apart pretty easy, though it's all torqued to crazy high specs, so we had to use a bunch of impact tools and air tools to get things undone. I was truly amazed at the exhaust nuts coming off so easily. We actually left the exhaust mounted, but I think we might drop it when installing the new engine as I believe it is going to cause some hangups when trying to situate the engine on the mounts if the exhaust is in the way.

One thing I was really surprised to see, but also made me feel better about junking the motor in the car, is about 1 gallon or more of coolant/water coming out of the oil pan when we drained the oil. I couldn't believe how clean it was under the normal motor oil, but this just goes to show the engine was done and there really was no saving it. It also looks as though a bunch of oil had leaked in the bellhousing area and been cooked around the flex plate, so it was obviously in really bad shape. Had a new valley pan, coolant pipes and water pump though, LOL.

Another thing we learned about these Range Rovers with the BMW engine is that the radiator is a full aluminum type with no plastic end tanks. We will be flushing it out, but the coolant that came out of the radiator was still light blue and looked super clean, so I feel good about reusing it. I think we will also reuse the water pump as it is basically brand new and looks a lot better than the one on the 4.6is motor, so long as it looks good on the motor side.










Next steps are to remove the oil pans and swap them over to the 4.6 engine. Not yet sure if I'm going to take care of doing the rod bearings or not. Would seem stupid not to with the engine out, but they are so expensive and I haven't really heard of many of these M62TU motors needing them at only 125k miles. The engine came out of a fully working vehicle and has had a ton of work done to it, so not sure I want to invite issues. I am probably going to order some new coolant hoses and such though as the ones in the RR are pretty old and soft. I hope to do some more work on the RR next weekend, so look for another update then.
 
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Just curious, but are you planning to uprate the transmission to the E53 4.6iS spec by changing the 260mm A85/F38 torque converter to the 280mm L51 unit, changing the bellhousing (or machining the ribs), adding the additional clutch plates to the D clutch and replacing the upper valve body with the revised ‘075’ block with the different KV-B & KV-E valves?











Phil
 

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2005 Range Rover HSE (4.6is Engine Swap)
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just curious, but are you planning to uprate the transmission to the E53 4.6iS spec by changing the 260mm A85/F38 torque converter to the 280mm L51 unit, changing the bellhousing (or machining the ribs), adding the additional clutch plates to the D clutch and replacing the upper valve body with the revised ‘075’ block with the different KV-B & KV-E valves?











Phil
Wasn't planning to. I'm keeping the stock RR gear ratios and transmission as the 4.6 only produces a little bit more power over the 4.4. That is good info though if I do end up needing to in the future. Is it instead possible to just use the X5 transmission and swap the RR transfer case over? Do they bolt up by chance?

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I admire your optimism, but unfortunately not. Both BMW E53 transmissions (1058 000 029 for 4.4i & 1058 000 034 for 4.6iS) use the standard BMW RWD main case but with an adaptor plate and intermediate shaft. The Range Rover transmission (1058 000 032) uses a different main case with an extended output shaft with a different (larger) spline. The back ends of the transmissions are quite different. All 24 versions of the ZF 5HP24 transmission had identical gear ratios. The BMW transmissions have the selector cable mechanism on the LH side of the casing, the Range Rover on the RH side.







Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
From your post, I started looking at swapping X5 to RR transmissions and found a lot of that same info from you in the past. Well, I'm hoping that the RR transmission is capable of handling the minor increase in power from the 4.6 engine as I know several people have swapped the 4.6 into their 540is and 740is without too much issue. Also, the Z8 Alpina also used a very similar engine and I think had the same 5HP24 transmission, so hopefully I'm ok. If you have any more insight though, I'm all ears. It wasn't exactly something I was thinking about. I suppose doing what you were talking about with swapping the torque converter, machining the ribs, adding the clutches and swapping the valves is the best thing to do to make it right, huh? Are those parts that are fairly readily available? I would likely need to find a transmission rebuilder here in the US as I'm sure sending it across the pond to you would be a bit excessive.
 

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The Alpina transmission (1058 000 035) also has the larger L51 torque converter and the 5 plate D-clutch i.e. same as the E53 4.6iS transmission.

I personally don’t think that BMW/ZF would have gone to the trouble of producing a new transmission model for these higher torque applications if it wasn’t necessary.

All the required parts should be easily available. For the D-clutch, for example, ZF just machine the groove in the clutch drum for the retaining snap ring further out by a distance equivalent to the thickness of a steel plate plus a friction plate, to accommodate the extra plate. Everything else in the clutch assembly is the same.





Sorry, I’ve turned your post about engines into one about transmissions. I’ll shut up now :)

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I certainly appreciate the information, for sure. You're probably right that they did indeed design the transmission to handle the extra torque for the 4.6is engine, especially since as you say, they used the same thing on the Alpina Z8. I guess I'll run it like it is for a while and see what happens. If I need a rebuild later, I can have a shop rebuild it using the extra/different parts perhaps. I'm not really much of an automatic guy anyways as all my other swaps involve using manual transmissions, but this is an interesting build for sure. This is just a daily driver and I got the car so cheap that I'm not too worried about the transmission in it, but if it goes, I'll do it right. For now, it will be fun. If I decide to try to supercharge the engine later with a twin-screw Jaguar kit, I'll definitely look into it at that point, LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Is anyone able to tell me what the blue-ish pipe/hose thing is in this picture? It's bundled with the battery cable going to the starter. I didn't have the wiring harness with the 4.6 motor, so I wasn't really sure what it went to and maybe it doesn't even have it since the starter is different. What does it connect to in the RR at the top?

 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Actually, that makes perfect sense and is actually what I was thinking it might be. Thanks for confirming. So it basically just sits up there near the battery terminal connection on the top of the intake?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is awesome! I seriously considered this route, then turbo M62, then n62 with headers, then diesel, then decided I should sell it and get a 5.0 SC :p
Probably way simpler, LOL. And you get the facelift as a bonus.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This weekend, I got a bit more done on the engine. I started swapping over accessories, motor mount brackets and exhaust manifolds. I was going to use the water pump from the Range Rover motor since it had less aluminum corrosion on it externally, but when I took it off, it smelled like burned rubber/coolant and looked horrible inside, so I decided to stick with the one from the 4.6is motor instead. I was able to clean it up a decent bit, so it's not bad. Used new o-rings where it attaches to the tubes going to the back of the engine and a new gasket.

I did transfer over the alternator, which did appear to be fine. Also used a new gasket on this and it needed a lot of cleaning as the Range Rover engine had puked oil everywhere on the front of the engine. I'm really not looking forward to having to clean the oil pan before transferring it as it's going to be a nightmare.

When pulling the exhaust manifolds, I found coolant sitting in them, which was a bit unexpected. This engine was really hurt.

Finally, got the motor mount brackets swapped over as well. I think the only things left to take off the old motor and swap are the power steering pump, the oil pan and pickup tube. I'm really hoping that the oil pump itself is the same so I don't have to use the Range Rover's. I have a feeling it's going to be very suspect. I figure I'll be doing a bunch of that work after Thanksgiving.




 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Another quick update. I decided to do a "BBK" on the front with a set of 2006-2009 L322 Supercharged brake calipers I got on Ebay for $278 shipped. I still need to order new rotors, backing plates and I want to get some new pads, but these are going to be sweet. They also need a good cleaning and I'll probably get them powdercoated while I'm at it with new Brembo stickers. I realize they aren't exactly a major upgrade or if they're even needed, but since the swap is pretty simple and relatively inexpensive, I figured why not.



Over the Thanksgiving holiday, I'll be hoping to get a bunch done on the RR.
 
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Great progress! This is a fun build
Thanks. I'm hoping to get the engine installed soon. I've never had this car running since I bought it. Probably about 2 years waiting.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Last night I did a bit more work on getting the new engine prepped for install. I stripped the oil pan and pump from the RR motor and discovered that the pump itself is in fact the same as the X5 pump, but the pickup tube is different. The oil pan was sooooo full of milkshake it was unbelievable. Was not fun to deal with, but I've got a lot more cleaning materials on order to take care of cleaning it over the weekend. I haven't pulled the X5 pan yet, but that's next, now that I can put the RR motor on some blocks and use the hoist to hold the X5 engine up while swapping the pans due to the oil pan being the where the lower bolts on the stand go. I think if this was a 540i or 740i engine, the pump would definitely need to be swapped over.

In case anyone needs the part numbers off of the pump and pickup tube, here are some pics:

Oil pump:




Pickup tube:

 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Finally got the engine installed this Thanksgiving weekend. Don't have a ton of pictures of the install, but it was mostly the reverse of removal. We did roll the RR outside and degreased and pressure washed the engine bay to prep for the new engine install. It was absolutely covered in a thick layer of "rust prevention", LOL. After that, we finished up transferring everything we needed to the new engine and dropped it in.

For anyone considering doing an engine swap on a L322, I highly recommend lowering the exhaust hangers in front of the rear axle and letting the exhaust rest on the sway bar heat shields, as well as unbolting the transmission crossmember when lowering the engine into the engine bay. We fought for about 30-45 mins with getting the height just right on the back of the engine and getting the engine mount brackets on the mounts. Once we did both of those steps, the engine dropped right in easily and even without disconnecting the rear driveshaft from the transfer case, then we could get the transmission lined up with the engine and run the bellhousing bolts in to tighten it up. Bolted up the torque converter bolts and put the exhaust back on.

Since I had disconnected all the wiring from the top of the engine and left it in the car, it was just a matter of dropping the main harness over the top of the engine and connecting the sensors. A lot easier than it looks. The part that confused the heck out of us was actually the coolant hoses. I bought all brand new hoses and the routing is kind of crazy as there are many connection points so many hoses. We actually accidentally pulled the thermostat out of the auto trans cooler connection and that was really confusing us, but I managed to get it put back together. That said, I ordered a new thermostat for the trans cooler anyways as I didn't like the corrosion on the old one. Was only about $50, so small price to pay.

While swapping out vacuum hoses on the back of the engine (before it went in), I accidentally broke the little nipple off of the CCV plate. Was really worried about it preventing me from getting the engine back in this past weekend, but after looking at my friend's parts L322 in my driveway, I found out that there's so much room back there to work with, I'll just order a new one and install it with the engine in the car. I'm just not used to having this much room, compared to most of my BMWs.

When reinstalling the wiring, there was one connector on the top passenger side (US spec) wiring box that I couldn't figure out what it went to. Fortunately, I had the parts L322 to look at and found out it's zip-tied up and goes to nothing! Guess it probably went to the SAP valve or something that this car doesn't have.

Another thing I was surprised about is that the L322 M62TU doesn't have an oil level sensor on the lower oil pan. I guess this is because of the much larger front diff, but it kind of puts a damper on my idea of running the X5 4.6is instrument cluster (well, a modified one with the Range Rover circuit board) to get oil temp and the warm up lights. I haven't started the car up to see if it can somehow get that oil temp elsewhere, but I'm guessing it won't be able to display that. Bummer, but not a big deal. It might actually still work, but I don't have any oil in the engine at the moment anyways, so we'll see what happens.

Also, installed a new power steering reservoir and hoses.



 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Also, I have a somewhat unrelated question. Is there a parts catalog available for these cars that is available online or download? For BMW, we have RealOEM.com, which is an amazing resource, but I'm having a really tough time finding little parts throughout the car and am basically at the whims of the big parts suppliers that list certain parts on their site. I'm betting a lot of them have a full parts catalog available to them, but if you don't know what part number to look up, we don't know if they have it or not.
 
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