RangeRovers.net Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Found out the hard way that if you hear a banging noise from the Cam timing chain, is to open the engine and replace all 3 guides. Allso do the right thing and replace the mainchain and the mainchain tentioner. I only did 215000KM's in mine. The other chains and tentioners seems to be OK.It seem that the long chain streches while the short one does not. allthough check your oilpump chain and tentioner aswell.
The biggest problem here in South Africa is that the toolkit to reallaign all can only be available through a LRD or BMWD or an acreddited fundy. They the get it from a library in Pretoria.The set however is cheap in UK and USA. To buy it and get it here will cost about 22 time the price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
i just did mine on a similar year /make (2005 hse). my advise to you is do not use any CHINESE made alignment tool kits. The jigs are not accurate and it isn't worth the time and effort to go back in repeatedly because your timing is not right.
This happened to me last week. i had to go back in to re-time my intake camshaft THREE TIMES,with a fourth on the way because i was using the red toolbox alignment kit.
The red kits are not labelled because they are chinese. Only use the blue kit or ones clearly labeled "made in Germany.
So i sent the red box back because i was unable to get my timing right on the intake can (bank 1-4) and now getting ready to rent the right/accurate German made kit.

If you get code p0011 after re-assembling the engine you'll know what the issue is after you pull the code if you use the wrong tools made in china.
If the back of the blocks lift anywhere above ".5mm" during your reassembly process, (IF YOU SEE A GAP BETWEEN YOUR BLOCKS AND THE TOP PART OF THE ENGINE BLOCK BASE) your timing will be off so make sure you have a 27 mm open wrench and an extra pair of hands holding things very steady during re-assembly.
Make sure before you tighten the tox bolt for the intake sproket you have the intake cam all the way back (counter clockwise and held there with that 127 mm wrench unitl you are able to secure it firmly in that position.
its so important as the ECM is programmed to read within a certian range but not beyond.. if for some reason there is so much movement during reassemly and things shift you can be sure youll be tearing down your upper timing cover etc to repeat the lock down /timing etc... I hope this helps... i learned the hard way...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Read my posts , i just went through this ...
 

·
Registered
2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
Joined
·
346 Posts
I am not sure if you are asking a question or making a statement.

Assuming you are asking a question on what to do about the timing kit for the M62 here is what I suggest. It is not optimal but it is a viable work around.

The timing kit contains 1) Bank 1 and Bank 2 blocks, 2) crank lock pin, 3) Vanos key (to turn Vanos to signal out), 4) deep well socket to remove Vanos solenoid, 5) Chain tensioner and 6) trigger wheel alignment jigs for Bank 1 and Bank 2.

1) If you have access to blocks of metal one could create the Bank 1 and 2 timing blocks. (I have seen people make a similar block for the BMW M54 engine out of wood). All that is required would be measurements from someone with the blocks (I no longer have mine) or measure the distances needed yourself. The blocks are basically thick pieces of iron with two slots ground out that mate with the square backs of the camshafts.

2) Crank lock lock pin can be fashioned from grinding down a thick and long enough metal bolt. Again someone could send you the critical measurements.

3) The vanos key can be made with a flat bar with welded pins that correspond and mate up to the vanos.

4) Deep well socket is not an issue, but needed.

5) I think with some finesse a zip tie would work.

6) Trigger wheel alignment - you can use the upper timing chain cover.

Those are your options.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top