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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #1
My issues started about a month ago, I noticed that while waiting at a red light the vehicle would all of a sudden idle down then back up. At first it was generating a cylinder 4 misfire. Eventually one day it died on me at a red light. I was able to limp it off the road by driving it with 2 feet, one on the gas and one on thee brake. Then had it towed home. I ordered some new ignition coils and replaced the 4 coil, but still couldn't get it going. Whenever I would give it gas it would bog down.

Then I found that if I unplugged the MAF sensor it would at least start and idle, but still if I gave it more gas it would bog down and die.

I recently replaced the water hose adapter on the back side of the engine due to it leaking coolant, and noticed a couple of skinny hoses (3/8" maybe) that were not connected. One was a clear hose and the other was black. Could one of these be a vacuum hose? I'm not sure if its even related.
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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Pics of the hoses. There are vent lines back there, so....
It needs plugging in I'd say. Otherwise you'll be chasing guesses and wasting money.
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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Look like the vent lines to me, although I'd have to check one of ours to be 100%.
What codes etc is it throwing?
Sounds like a fuel issue if you give it gas and it dies. What is the fuel pressure reading?? I had one recently that had 20psi, would drive but drive like crap. Fuel hose and come off the pump is all it was....
Moral of the story, get the actual pressure reading, and dont be a "its squirting fuel" clown.

Martin
 

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Black one is either tranny or diff vent. Clear one is most likely the other vent that was replaced if it broke or was plugged. Neither plug into anything at this end.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Discussion Starter #8
according to the rave, "A Schraeder valve is installed in the fuel rail, to
the rear of injector No. 7, to enable the fuel pressure to be checked
", do the injector numbers not coincide with the cylinder numbers? Cause it appeared to me that the pressure valve is located right above cylinder 1
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Rave says that fuel pressure should be between 3.25 and 3.75 bar which converts to 47.14-54.39 psi, so looks like a fuel pump and fuel filter replacement are in my future.

I do have another question before I go through replacing them. Could a poor battery be affecting all of this? The reason I ask is we have had abnormally cold temps in MN this year and I have had multiple days where my battery couldn't even turn the engine over, so I would give it a good charge and then it was fine. I took the vehicle to batteries plus and had them check the battery and they said it was good just needed to be fully charged. Last winter I had to replace the alternator, and it shows that it is putting out around 14.xx volts.
 

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charge the battery then test the fuel pressure
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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Voltage at the pump is easy to check, but with the rig running you'll be getting full voltage anyways.
Check voltage by all means, but I'd say a filter to start, then a pump.

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #12
quick update: purchased a new battery and that did not resolve the issue. Currently not getting any pressure on the fuel rail, and manually jumping the fuel pump will not turn it on(fuse 51 is good, also). So I have ordered a new fuel pump. Fuel filter came in today, but it was -22f when I woke up this morning so I decided I'll just wait until the fuel pump gets here before I tear into everything.

Another thought that came to my head, could there be an injector stuck open that is causing the pump not to create the proper pressure, which is in turn flooding out the cylinder
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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If you had an injector stuck open, it would wash out the cylinder and try to hydrolock it. Does it turn over freely? If so then it's another reason I doubt it.
If the fuse and relay are all OK, which needs to be checked at the pump, then it's the pump.
So check for voltage at the pump, easy from inside, then if it is getting voltage but the pump isnt running.....it's the pump.
Here is a diagram of the fuel pump system.
I stick to my original thought of pump/filter. It would take a really bad filter to drop the pressure by that uch, but it's worth doing if it isnt known when it was replaced last.
fuel pump.gif

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm getting 12v across pins 1 and 4 at the pump, but only when I attempt to turn it over. I thought fuel pumps usually turn on when the ignition is turned on even without attempting to turn it over?
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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Where did you check the pump at exactly? At the pump, or the relay?

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Right at the pump, where you fold down the rear seats and lift the carpet, then slide off the connector
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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Did the ground terminal of the pump ohm to ground?
If so....
As a quick and dirty test;
Connect the fuel pressure gauge to the rail again.
Run a wire to the pump long enough to reach the battery, with the stock plug unplugged to stop any back feeding.
Get a good ground to the negative side, like a body fastener that ohms out to ground.
Stand under the hood where you can see the gauge, and connect the live wire that is connected to + on the pump, to the battery and watch the gauge.
If it stays low or at zero, pump is shot. If it jumps to @50pi or so, then its a wiring/communication issue. If it jumps, you can have an assistant try to start it and watch the gauge.
Again, this is a quick and dirty test, but will show you the issue pretty much

Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I got the new fuel pump today and put it in and it fired right up. I'm showing the correct amount of pressure on the fuel rail.

A piece of advice for anyone else attempting this. You will need to remove both access covers on the fuel tank and you will need to stick your arm in the driver's side access hole to unclip the connector from the pump on the passenger side. I examined the new pump first to get an understanding of how it disconnects. Also when placing the drivers side siphoning piece, place the top in first then slide the bottom into place. Keeping in mind when I reference driver/passenger side I'm referring to a us model.
 

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When i first replaced the pump only i had issues because the clamp I used did not clamp the hose properly at the pump end. So if you replace pump only make sure you have the proper clicker type clamp and or a 360 degree clamp. The hose is plastic and does not compress easily and will not compress evenly with a regular hose clamp. As far as voltage goes when I would turn the key to check fuel pressure the pump would fire up-create 50 plus psi and then would shut off. The gauge very quickly returned to 0 psi but with the ignition still on the pump would not restart to build up pressure again until the key was cycled again. So something with the engine running-ie oil pressure or another signal keeps the pump running. When running-even with bleeding off the pump maintained 50 psi. To prove that the fuel pressure regulator in the filter works you should see a momentary blip on the pressure gauge if you blip the throttle-if yours will rev as it is. So I would agree that the pump/filter is the culprit. Storey Wilson has shown that relays can be intermittent so that is a possibility but should not be the sole cause if you have consistent low fuel pressure its hard to imagine that the relay is only allowing partial voltage to flow thru to the pump. May be a rare case of a corroded ground that reduces voltage. Glad you got a tester that works. I borrowed one from a local parts garage and it was ruined by a former loaner so I cobbled one together with an air gauge fitting and a proper fluid filled fuel pressure gauge. Numerous Threads on here if you go for the pump. USA pumps around a 100 or less. In Canada the pump only was 400 plus cdn. but less than the 1000 plus for the whole assembly
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Just went to fill it up with gas for the first time since replacing the fuel pump and I noticed I was sitting in my vehicle longer than normal. So I looked at the pump and it said it had already put in 30 gallons, so I jumped out and could hear gas spilling out on the ground from underneath the vehicle. I'm going to open it back up tonight and see what the issue might be. I'm thinking the rubber gasket might have pulled out with the old fuel pump so its not getting a good seal. Does anyone know if the fuel pump has a notch on the bottom of the tank that it sits in like the fuel level sensor over on the other side of the tank? I remember when I put the fuel pump in I had to put some downward pressure on it collapsing the spring within the fuel pump a little.

Also I could smell some oil burning then as I pulled away I left a large cloud of white smoke. I then drove about 3 blocks to my work and parked it (the whole time the SES light was blinking) and the large cloud of white smoke continued and I could tell it was oil. I shut it off popped the hood and could see oil had been spraying out from the passenger side of the engine. We had cold temps overnight and it was -5 when all of this happened. So I'm going to trailer it home today and open it up to see where it is coming from. From what I've gathered from other posts sounds like it might be a frozen pcv.
 
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