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2004 Range Rover - Air Suspension Inactive - "reservoir pressure static when filling"

I have a 2004 Range Rover with over 114,000 miles on it. The Air Suspension Inactive message came on 1 month ago. I took it to an independent mechanic with the All Comms tool and received the error message, "reservoir pressure static when filling." He cleared the code and the suspension operated normally. About 4 days later, the Air Suspension Inactive came back on.

About 2 weeks ago, it was 5 degrees Fahrenheit outside and my the front passenger side was super low. It was so low I thought the body of the vehicle was covering the tire. The other struts sat low but not nearly as low as the front right. I drove on it for awhile and it eventually popped back up.

Today, here in Chicago it registers 1 degree outside. Same thing, front right strut sat super low. I drove for awhile and it popped back up.

So I'm guessing the problem is 1 of the following:
1. Tired Air Compressor
2. Faulty sensor on passenger side
3. Bad strut / slow leak

How do you suggest fixing this? I want to be cost effective. Should I buy the air compressor first? Replace the strut first? Sensor?

Any suggestions are appreciated. This is my first post...good to be here. Cheers.
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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9,242 Posts
Re: 2004 Range Rover - Air Suspension Inactive - "reservoir pressure static when fill

Cost effective, and throwing parts at it blindly, are not really the same thing now are they?
Easiest thing to check is a leak, so get it up and running, and spray the suspect airbag/strut with soapy water. Do this at all heights, as the bag can get a bad "spot" on them, to where they only leak at a certain position.
If that checks out, then use your Allcoms (was it yours?) to view the data from the height sensors. If you have a bad one (I doubt it myself), then it will show itself there.
A bad compressor can be tested by a very old fashioned method....Drain the tank and time the refill!
If you dont have an Allcoms, buy one ASAP. For what you paid that "Indy", you could probably have half bought one already. This will allow YOU to test, reset, and view the data as it happens, instead of just blindly resetting a code and keeping your fingers crossed.
After all that, I would just about lay money on a leak at the lowered corner. The fault is displaying itself like that due to the air that the compressor is putting out is going directly into the affected (leaking) air bag, and thus the EAS ECM is not seeing the tank pressure rising. EAS is an easy system to both trouble shoot and keep in tip top shape in my experiences, you just have to get over the initial fear of it and get stuck in, so to speak.
Time for the soapy water IMHO.
Martin
 

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Re: 2004 Range Rover - Air Suspension Inactive - "reservoir pressure static when fill

I had same problem. Checked for leaks, bought RSW software to clear, kept having same error. After rwading extensively bought a new compressor from Arnott Industries, no problems for 6 months. Good Luck!
 

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Re: 2004 Range Rover - Air Suspension Inactive - "reservoir pressure static when fill

Today, here in Chicago it registers 1 degree outside. Same thing, front right strut sat super low. I drove for awhile and it popped back up.

So I'm guessing the problem is 1 of the following:
1. Tired Air Compressor
2. Faulty sensor on passenger side
3. Bad strut / slow leak

How do you suggest fixing this? I want to be cost effective. Should I buy the air compressor first? Replace the strut first? Sensor?

Any suggestions are appreciated. This is my first post...good to be here. Cheers.
#1 a tired air compressor would likely effect more than one shock. Probably not the problem.
#2 Sensors don't go bad often. Probably not the problem
#3 I had the same code and had a leak in the shock. Probably the problem.

However, do not replace it without checking it. As someone else suggested spray everything with soapy water at different levels.

All Comms. I recommend it. It's cheaper than one trip to the dealer here in Denver.

If it turns out to be a shock, replace them in pairs. Call Arnott. Even if you can't change them yourself you could order and have your local indy install them. To much of a hassle? Call the dealer and see what they want for shock replacement.....you'll call Arnott back.
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Re: 2004 Range Rover - Air Suspension Inactive - "reservoir

Cost effective, and throwing parts at it blindly, are not really the same thing now are they?
Easiest thing to check is a leak, so get it up and running, and spray the suspect airbag/strut with soapy water. Do this at all heights, as the bag can get a bad "spot" on them, to where they only leak at a certain position.
If that checks out, then use your Allcoms (was it yours?) to view the data from the height sensors. If you have a bad one (I doubt it myself), then it will show itself there.
A bad compressor can be tested by a very old fashioned method....Drain the tank and time the refill!
If you dont have an Allcoms, buy one ASAP. For what you paid that "Indy", you could probably have half bought one already. This will allow YOU to test, reset, and view the data as it happens, instead of just blindly resetting a code and keeping your fingers crossed.
After all that, I would just about lay money on a leak at the lowered corner. The fault is displaying itself like that due to the air that the compressor is putting out is going directly into the affected (leaking) air bag, and thus the EAS ECM is not seeing the tank pressure rising. EAS is an easy system to both trouble shoot and keep in tip top shape in my experiences, you just have to get over the initial fear of it and get stuck in, so to speak.
Time for the soapy water IMHO.
Martin
I have the same error consistently now for several months, done a leak/sag test and it holds air all night so that's not a problem. I've also cleared headlight codes. I'm guessing it's my compressor but not sure what normal time is to go from Normal height to Off-road. I timed mine at 57 seconds...seems long, but I have no benchmark. I also use the All Comms tool to read heights and I get weird numbers like LF 18157, LR 5, RR 0, RF -18450 or something like that. I'm going to ask Storey about that one.

So what's the normal rise height time?

I've also read about some doing a software update that seems to update the temperature range values. Don't know about this.
 

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JACK'S GRANDAD
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9,242 Posts
Re: 2004 Range Rover - Air Suspension Inactive - "reservoir

Dave would be the one to answer the software update question.
It isn't really the inflation time, its the time to fill the tank from empty that you would check for compressor health.

Martin
 

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Re: 2004 Range Rover - Air Suspension Inactive - "reservoir

99% likely another leaky strut.
How long has it been since that strut's been installed?

My front-left failed about 2 weeks ago. I installed that one in 2008, so it lasted 7 years.
It only leaked if I lowered the suspension to at most the highway height - that's how the RR brought it to my attention.
I was driving down the turnpike when I noticed the steering being pulled to the left. Then I noticed the left front corner seeming to get lower than the right.

Are you able to lower the suspension all the way to the lowest height (access) without hearing a leak at one corner?
If it does leak as it lowers, just open the door, get a jack under it and lift it up to about the height where it doesn't leak and close the door so it can refill the airstrut.
Then remove the jack and raise the RR to full off road height. Park it. order a replacement strut. When it arrives, replace it...

...Or have it flat-bedded to the QUALIFIED repair center of your choice to have the air strut replaced.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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The air compressor is in the housing in the center of the spare tire well. Lift your spare out and there will be a cover that looks like a turtle shell under it, the compressor is inside that. The air tank is under the passenger side (north america) rocker panel, between the outer rocker and the frame rail.
 
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