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Discussion Starter #1
In advance, I would like to thank anyone who is willing to help me with my problem. I was wondering if I could have a blown head gasket or other serious repair. I purchased a used Range Rover 2004 today with 93000 miles from a private owner. The family was really forthcoming about any issues that the car has (Air Suspension inactive, mirror gear stripped, etc.). They informed me that they have recently replaced the water pump and fan clutch assembly. I test drove the car and then purchased it. Sooo, on my way home... rather a long distance of approximately 60 miles, the car was doing initially very well. However, almost home (5 miles out) the car dash indicated to check the gages, which I did. I noticed that the car had heated up to approximately half between hot and cool... thought that was ok. I kept driving and the gage climbed up towards getting hotter and the next thing I knew a HUUUGE smoke cloud came from under, what appeared to be the entire car, especially the hood area. I immediately pulled over and turned it off. It was a matter of only a few minutes between gages being between cool and hot and going further up and huge smoke cloud. I do not want the reader to think that I was driving the car for a long time while it was overheating. I called a toe truck as I was scared to add water/coolant myself (I know with engine cooled down and running, but still was scared). I have to admit something here that I think is important. Right before all began, I decided to accelerate REALLY fast just to see what it can do :oops:. I know that was probably stupid, especially because I am a woman and could have lived without doing that. I am aware that normally that should not affect anything, but with circumstances of recently having a water pump and fan clutch replaced, did I stress the engine too much that the heat knocked something lose? She is such a beauty and I was so proud of her, but now I'm looking at spending additional money to fix her :?. Please help. Any advice is appreciated.
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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Hi,

I'd like to say don't panic but I've been in your situation and it's not easy not to panic. First off you need to check your expansion tank, as you look at the engine it's at the front on the right, it's black and has a black cap on it.

They are known to crack and release steam in a spectacular fashion, or in my case the expansion tank cap did its job and released loads of steam. You can check by looking for deposits of dried antifreeze on the tank or near to the cap. If there aren't any deposits don't discount the possibility of a crack as they can be very difficult to see.

In my case the expulsion of steam was due to a pressure build up caused by a blocked radiator.

So I would suggest the following -

Check for a cracked expansion tank
Remove and flush through the radiator or ideally replace it if it hasn't been replaced already
Change the expansion tank cap for a one rated at 140

I've mentioned flushing through the radiator, this is because they get choked up very easily and quickly become blocked. If you can check with the previous owner to see if they have ever replaced the radiator, if not then I would seriously consider replacing it. A block radiator can also lead to a damaged transmission.

I mentioned replacing the cap, this is because Land Rover knew there was a problem with expansion tanks cracking because of pressure and lowered the pressure rating of the caps to avoid this. After I found that my radiator was blocked I replaced the radiator and both the tank and the cap just in case. Surprisingly the cost of replacement is minimal and could avoid any hidden problems with cracks etc.

They also may not have bled the system through properly when they replaced the water pump, these cars are well known for being awkward while trying to bleed the system and this may have caused a pressure build up and blown one of the radiator hoses off. There are loads of write ups to walk you through bleeding the system and also the radiator / expansion tank / cap problems.

Good luck with your investigations and don't automatically think head gaskets as these cars engines are normally quite tough. If you search for my posts you'll see what I found in my radiator when I flushed it through - not nice..

I've attached a picture of my expansion tank after it blew..

Regards
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for your reply. Unfortunately I had to have it towed to a local shop and I am concerned that they may try to get over on me. I'm pretty smart when it comes to business and will not allow them to tell me just anything, but still, they may try to raise the price because they feel that a person owning a range rover can afford it. Do you think that my sudden acceleration as mentioned in my original post had anything to do with something getting lose under the hood pertaining to coolant system? Also, there was a lot of coolant spilled (green). I already went to the shop this morning to "check on" things and I can tell you they were brushing me off already. I would like to be there when they pull it in the bay and open the hood. That way I can see what's going on when they diagnose the problem. I know I am being overprotective, but I have seen so many people getting over on others.
 

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I have to admit, a similar thing happened to me the day I bought mine. The gauge started to climb just over normal and I pulled in to a gas station to wait a few min and check the level. The computer will actually tell you if the coolant is low since there is a sensor in the expansion tank. FYI make sure that is plugged in. It was fine going home and would raise a bit and go back down. There was air in the system. I then checked the transmission cooler and it was partially blocked. You can get a new one for $100 bucks or so. I also changed the radiator for less than $200 from rock auto. The previous owner put stop leak in and it clogged the system. Check the expansion tank as well since mine did crack after I had the car a year.

I would replace the radiator and transmission cooler just for peace of mind since they can clog easily. It's worth the few hundred bucks knowing they are in working order. After that, properly bleed the system. I took 2 days to do it. Park on an incline or jack up the front and let it run and bleed the air. I then drove around the block a few times and parked it. After it cooled completely (overnight) I topped off the coolant and did it over again. That procedure worked for me.

Ryan
 

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Hi,

Coolant on the floor could mean one of a few things,

A hose may have come off under pressure,
The radiator may have a hole or split in it,
The expansion tank may have cracked.

Try to get it seen by a Land Rover independent not a run of the mill workshop. Not that a normal workshop couldn't do the job, it's just that Range Rovers need a certain antifreeze depending on the year and if you mix it with another type you'll be in a whole load of trouble as it turns to mush in the radiator and blocks it solid. Not only that Land Rover indies know the problems right away as they deal with them day in day out.

The sudden acceleration shouldn't have caused the problems as such but the increase in temperature might have exacerbated an existing fault and just tipped it over the edge.

Regards
 

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2002-2005 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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It's unlikely that you blew a head gasket by overheating it so briefly. The steam/smoke was probably from the cooling system bursting at some point. It could be the radiator, the expansion tank, the radiator hoses, or the water pump. The M62tu runs the coolant at a very hot temperature (105ºC if I remember correctly) and it's kept from boiling by being at a high pressure. Since it's so hot and pressurized it makes for some pretty spectacular smoke when it bursts.
 

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There should not be any green coolant anywhere near your 2004 RR.
The coolant should be BLUE, and it's not a blueish-green blue either. It's blue. Since it's a BMW engine, the BMW coolant is made for the aluminum alloys and plastics in the cooling system.

When you accelerate "briskly" in your BMW-configured RR, the thermostat is sent an electric voltage or "signal" to open up all the way to provide maximum coolant flow to counter the expected heat surge. These electric thermostats can short out and burn up, but that should give you a different sort of failure, possibly power problems since it draws the voltage down from the power source.
But the good news is that it doesn't sound like your experience.
Back to the green coolant!
The florescent green coolant would be common Prestone coolant, which shouldn't be put in our BMW system. It can degrade the plastics and aluminums in the cooling system. All of the many hoses in the cooling system have plastic connection points. Over a period of time with the corrosive coolant and high temperatures, the plastic will weaken and fail and break.

As said above, ONLY trust your 2004 with a RR-specific mechanic, preferably an independent one with more reasonable cost, and much experience with the BMW-era RR. They may suggest you replace
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for such great information. That really helped put my mind at ease. I have my RR back and she is running fine. One of the hoses that connects to the manifold broke and came off. It took me quite a bit of searching to find the part I needed (had to drive 1 1/2 to get it). Thanks again and I will be starting another threat asking about all the awesome features on my RR that I am completely unfamiliar with.
 

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2010 SC 5.0 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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more than likely you had the short hose at the rear of the engine let go.
This is a common failure the hose is about 8 inches long and connects the water bridge to the fire wall area

also the valley pan may also be leaking,
to find it look along the intake manifold base for puddles or white crusty deposits,


link to coolant hose replacement pay attention to the hoses at the rear of the engine


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...bFgC11ruNYMHBpCCQ&sig2=4hJcgjd5nGwRAj8AkYVWqA
 

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Hi again,

So it's looking a bit more involved than you had probably hoped for, welcome to the wonderful world of Range Rover ownership.

As I said earlier, find a Land Rover independent workshop and make friends as you will probably be there more times than you expect. I'm not knocking Range Rover, I love them and they definitely get in your blood, but they do need constant care and attention and when they are running right nothing can touch them.

So have it looked over at an indy and they'll probably diagnose correctly first time as opposed to a general workshop who will probably eventually guess their way to the problem, and that will cost you more in the long run.

Regards
 
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