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Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking for some time for the cause of a noise that I had thought was originating from a half shaft or prop shaft, but after consulting with a very helpful service department at my local dealership, I now know it's a problem with the transfer case.
The experienced service tech that drove my RR said that it sounds like the chain in the transfer case stretched to the point where it'd slipping.
I have found replacement chains available.
Have any of you ever dug into the NV225 transfer case/box, or replaced the chain in one?
Is there a service manual available for the transfer case?
 

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The Magna Steyr DD295 transfer case used in later models is quite well covered in the workshop manual (including chain replacement) but, unfortunately, that’s not the case for the earlier New Venture Gear NV225 unit. The workshop manual does provide a reasonable description, but the Service Manual only describes how to replace the lip seals (externally) and set the fluid level – and that’s it. This transfer box was only ever used in the Range Rover.

I’ve pulled one apart (for fun) but, as I didn’t need to get it back together again, I’m afraid I’m not much use.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SuBLha8E3wY

You can see the Hy-Vo chain through the drain plug hole so I guess you could maybe poke a screwdriver through the hole to lift the chain away from the sprocket to get an idea how slack it is?







Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That is more information than I had, and it is helpful.
From your exploration into taking the NV225 apart, does it look like replacing the chain would differ greatly from it would on the DD295?
I haven't been able to find much on-line about the NV225 so far, but have found a place that sells them rebuilt for just over $2,000 US.
Of course I'd rather be able to replace the $175 chain, if it's the problem.

The easiest option I could imagine or hope for could be if I could replace the chain with the transfer box in situ, only needing to remove the rear shaft and rear cover.

From your pics, it looks like I may be able to see not only how slack the chain is, but also the condition of at least the one cog that meshes with the chain. And when I drain it, I will see any metal that might be in the oil from the slipping/grinding.

Thank you so much for helping with what you know about it. As limited as you feel it is, it's more than probably anyone else knows, and is helpful.
I appreciate your help.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
...sounds like a machine gun under the seat...
Thanks for bringing that up, ToadHall; That brings something to mind that I'm curious about and need to follow-up on.

From the drivers seat, it sounds to me like it's from the right-rear area of the vehicle.
Now riding in the passenger seat when the LR dealership mechanic was driving, it didn't seem to be from the right, but it did still sound more like it was at least slightly BEHIND the front seats. Looking at where the transfer case is, I'd expect it to be coming from right under the front seats.

I'll have to have my wife drive, climb into the back seat, and listen closer and for longer if needed to see where the sound's really coming from.

I didn't think of it like the sound of a machine gun, but it does remind me of a .50 cal now that you mention it.

Is that an English Setter in your avatar?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I drained the transfer case oil and checked the chain as best I could.
It didn't look too bad from the drain hole. It wouldn't really be pried from the cog.
I also looked at it through the fill port too, and with that part of the chain not against a cog, I deflected it with a screwdriver, and it seemed pretty tight.
I did notice that the oil that drained was not a liter, and showed it's age as far as being dirty.
I'll try to attached the video of me deflecting the chain from the fill port.

After putting it back together, I did drive it, and induced the slippage/noise with my head stretched back over the center-rear of the console. It did sound like it was coming from the x-fer case from there.
I must express my appreciation for the Orlando Land Rover dealership for the repair technicians help, knowledge and advice with this. Of course his honest and sensible advice was to replace the whole vehicle, and his advice for the most "reliable" RR was the '08/'09 MYs, with the '13+ being describes as making my (or any) '03-'05 MY seem like a conestoga wagon. After my visit to the dealership after visiting the local independent LR expert, I'll pay the little extra for the dealership's service.

SAM_2593.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Open letter, and if RRPhil has any helpful info all the better.
Since my transfer case chain needs to be replaced AND my transmission has the occasional symptom of not immediately engaging into gear when put into D, I expect it would be best to take both the transmission and transfer case out together.
Does anyone have any idea if it's okay or better to remove the transmission and transfer case attached, then detach them once removed as a set?
Or is it somehow easier or a must to remove the transfer case first, then the transmission?
 
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