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Hello. I have a 2001 Range Rover 4.6 SE which needs the fuel pump replaced. 1. Am trying to determine specific location, how to access, etc...
1. Must I cut a hole in the floor of the vehicle? 2. If so, would anyone know the specs of the specific location? 3. Must the tank be dropped? Thank you.
 

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Detailed steps are in the RAVE workshop manual with pictures. The positive side to dropping the tank is you can inspect for corrosion and make sure your brake lines are in perfect shape.
 

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Having done this twice, on the 99 and the 02, I would say drop the tank.
Be sure to siphon or pump out as much fuel as possible first, and a floor jack with a 1 ft square of plywood or a transmission jack will make the job a breeze.
Once you start hacking holes in the back with grinders or saws, you will take the very real chance of cutting something you do not want to, starting a fire, or worse!

If you were gonna cut anyway, use a large hole saw, and then enlarge the circular hole so that an marine plastic inspection port (Pyhi) can be installed, and properly bedded with sealant, so no exhaust gasses, water or critters can get in.
Doing a proper job of hole cutting will take way longer to do, and in the end, if you put in a quality replacement pump, you will never have to drop the tank again.
 

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If you have access to a ramp or lift, dropping the tank is ot too bad. If not, an access hole is the way to go IMHO. The car I last did this on already had the rear seats removed, which made things even easier. You can drill out the spotwelds on the edge of the seatbox (front and side) and carefully grind through one other side, leaving the fourth as a hinge so you can fold it back afterwards. Spotwelds can be replaced with rivets or screws, a bit of sealant or tape will close the seams.

Filip
 

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I accessed mine through the floor - each to their own, but I now have access to pipes and electrical connectors forever - more details on my blog here

I used a hole saw to cut all 4 corners of the access hole - tape the hole saw with insulation tape generously a few millimeters up its shank - that way when it bursts through the metal, it won't suddenly drop through and start drilling important bits - note I packed the hole saw with washers so the centre drill only just protrudes, again, there's less chance of drilling things on the blind side.

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I cut the piece out with an oscillating multi tool - really controllable and no sparks.

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My aperture has a permanent frame with a removable lid - it just makes access easier in the future and it's neat - the hole is rubber lined, and the lid has a gasket so there's no fume or damp issues.

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I've tried to include pictures for you, but this habitually fails with me, so if you can't see them, PM me and I'll send them over.
 

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Biggest problem with cutting a hole is that it allows you to get to the fuel pump but not the pipes. I've had two cars now that have developed leaks because the pipes had rusted above the tank so it has had to be dropped anyway to change them. You may as well do it properly once rather than having to do it a second time.
 

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Dang good way to try out your replacement insurance. Do it the proper way by dropping the tank there is zero risk of toasting your Rover.
 
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