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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My RRS hit @ 85K mi, so I decided to give it a tune up. It's something you can do with a minimal number of tools, and if you never worked on a car before it's a good project to start with.
On a scale of 1-5 wrenches, I give it 1 wrench.

I changed the air filter, cleaned the MAF, installed a new PCV, installed a new coolant bleed valve, and changed the plugs. This will take about 2 hrs.

Tools:
-#2 Philips screwdriver
- Flat head screwdriver
- Torx T-25 screwdriver
- 6mm socket
- 8mm socket
- 4-5" Socket extension
- 5/8" Spark plug socket
- Flexible-u-joint extension
- or a combination 5/8" spark plug socket with u-joint i.e.,

USP58.jpg
-Plastic safe electrical spray lube--I used CRC 2-26 Plastic Safe Multi Purpose Precision Lubricant

Parts:
-Air filter = $22
-PCV valve = $43
-Spark plugs = $105 (NGK Iridiums are expensive!)
-Coolant t-fitting = $15
-Band aids = $5/box
Total = $185 w/out Band aids

Air filter:
Undo all the Phillips head screws around the air filter housing.

Note--the screws do do need to be removed--just backed out fully
IMG_0654.jpg
IMG_0655.jpg

Loosen the metal hose clamp around the MAF and disconnect the MAF plug.
IMG_0657.jpg

View attachment 16536
Lightly spray the male and female plug with contact cleaner and when dry, follow with a squirt of electrical lube.
IMG_0663.jpg
IMG_0662.jpg
**Note-- you need to disconnect the plastic anchor connector from the MAF harness to remove the air box cover**
View attachment 16534
IMG_0664.jpg

Replace filter...old filter vs. new filter.
IMG_0660.jpg

View attachment 16537
Next remove the engine cover--you will need the 6mm socket to remove 4 screws. You also need to unscrew the oil filler cap.
IMG_0665.jpg

It will look like this when removed. I replaced the oil filler cap in this pic.
View attachment 16550
IMG_0667.jpg

Also leave airbox cover off for next step...cleaning the MAF.
 

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Thanks GooseyLoosey. I'm looking forward to the spark plug steps.

Sincerely, Mark
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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5,175 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Cleaning the MAF

The MAF does not need to be removed from the air box housing to clean the IAF. (See RoverGuy7's follow-up post below for additional comments on cleaning the MAF). In the picture below the IAF wire is just to the right of the tube which is @12 o'clock.

Its difficult to see in the pic but my IAF wire was covered with a bit of black grime.

Aim a stream of cleaner at the wire and spray until the wire is clean. Turn the box over and spray cleaner from the other side. DO NOT spray the wire with any lubricant or touch it. Just let dry.

IMG_0658.jpg

Move air box cover with attached MAF to someplace safe--leave this off the car right now.

Remove PCV valve

Using the T-25 driver remove PCV.

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To remove the hose from the PCV outlet--squeeze the ribbed sections of the plug shown below and wiggle plug off.

IMG_0671.jpg

Take a small rag and plug the PCV valve hole in the valve cover. Remove plastic cover covering to get access to spark plug coils.

This cover just snaps off--there are two snaps on this cover--just pry off gently and lay cover to the side.
IMG_0672.jpg
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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5,175 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Changing the plugs

This is what the passenger side bank looks like with the cover removed (I removed the rag from the PCV hole in this pic). Put it back in before removing the coils as I can almost guarantee that if you drop a screw you will somehow drop it in that hole even so the odds of doing so are 1,000,000:1.`)

**Note--those gold colored pins are where the plastic cover we just removed snaps to.**

IMG_0678.jpg

You'll need a 8mm socket to remove the ignition coil retaining screw. Remove screw completely and set it aside. Pull ignition coil straight up and move it out of the way.

**Note-- the front 3 coils can be removed with the connector plug attached. You may have to loosen the harness a bit--there's a small anchor between coil #2 and #3 you can pull up to move harness.
Whether you decide to remove the connector from the coil or leave it attached, I would recommend removing each one from the coil and spraying the connectors with the electrical cleaner and some electrical lubricant before reconnecting them.**

**Note--the rear coil on both sides cannot be removed without removing the connector first.**

The front coil removed--spark plug is still in the head.

IMG_0675.jpg
Next, using the socket wrench with the flexible plug socket + extension, remove the spark plug. You may have to use a good bit of force to crack it loose after 85K miles.

Old vs. new plug

IMG_0676.jpg

The OE plugs are pre-gapped but I double checked the gaps on the plugs just to make sure. They were fine. (Again, see RoverGuy7's follow up post on this.)

IMG_0674.jpg
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Changing the plugs--cont'd

Install new plug. Starting the plug into the hole is the only possible place where you can really screw something up. ALWAYS HAND THREAD THE NEW PLUG INTO THE HEAD VIA THE SOCKET EXTENSION >> IF THE PLUG DOES NOT THREAD VERY EASILY FOR THE FIRST 5 OR SO TURNS BACK IT OUT AND RETRY. Once you hit some resistance hand tightening, attach the socket wrench and continue tightening.

LR and every car mfgr in the world will tell you the plugs need to be torqued to a specific #. Take that under advisement. That said, I've probably installed 100 plugs in my life and never used a torque wrench. You develop a feel for this after a while. Using a standard 3/8" drive socket wrench, I put my hand about halfway down the handle and pull almost as hard as I can to seat the plug.

**Note--you will feel a point where the plug starts to get difficult to turn with the wrench. This is the crush washer starting to deform. Continue to tighten (hand halfway down handle) and you will eventually feel a hard stop. This is the point to stop.**

Reinsert the coil, and attach the retaining screw.

Move to the next plug, and then the next.

Ditto on the other side.

The back plug on the driver's side is probably the hardest to get access to, but by the time you get to that one you'll be an expert. :grin:

Once all the plugs have been replaced, replace the plastic plug covers--they just snap back in over those gold pins.

While you have the cover off...replace that coolant bleed tee

So based on this thread:
http://www.rangerovers.net/forum/9-range-rover-sport-l320/47537-radiator-coolant-hose-valve-broken-2006-range-rover-sport.html

I replaced the coolant bleed tee, just to be safe. I also zip tied this tee to the throttle body. In stock form, this thing just kinda hangs there and I can see it possibly knocking around against the throttle body. Maybe that's one reason it seems to fail IDK. But here is a picture on what it looks zip tied to the t/b.
IMG_0677.jpg

**Note: ONLY replace this after the engine is COLD. You pinch the two hose clamps carefully with pliers to remove the old one...you will get some coolant dripping out so put a rag under it when removing.**

Basically at this point you are done...just remember to:

1. Install new PCV valve
2. Reattach airbox cover to intake hose via hose clamp
3. Attach MAF plug --and resnap the harness to the appropriate anchor points (one on air box, one on PCV)
4. Tighten screws on air box cover.

Start engine and let it warm up--check for coolant leaks, air leaks, etc.

Reinstall engine cover.

Clean grease and blood off hands.

IMG_0681.jpg
 

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I have 99.6 K miles on mine. This is my project for next weekend. Gooseyloosey you are right. On time and just in time. Many thanks from your California brother. My Indy shop wanted $380.00 yes that is THREE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY FREAKING DOLLARS TO CHANGE EIGHT SPARK PLUGS AND ONE AIR FILTER! It's time I do this my self.

Umbertob, what's the name of your favorite Indy shop in LA? (for other work, not spark plugs I'll do myself!)

Thanks Gooseyloosey!

Mark
 

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2010-2012 Range Rover MkIII / L322
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436 Posts
Thanks for posting, well done!
When changing the coolent T valve, do you have to bleed the system? If so, what is that procedure?

What is the spark plug gap?

Thanks
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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5,175 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for posting, well done!
When changing the coolent T valve, do you have to bleed the system? If so, what is that procedure?

Thanks
I did not bleed it, but its probably good to do so "by the book." I would imagine you just run the engine, then carefully open the bleed on the t-fitting.

Very little coolant drained from mine. I had an old beach towel rolled under it so it was as high as I could get it, and just did one side and then the other.

I actually bought a spare fitting ($15 + tax at the dealer) to keep in my emergency kit.
 

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Very good write up. And 2 hours is exactly what we charge for this same service, including clearing any faults from the PCM, and reseting the adaptions.

Two things I would like to mention, I normally use a T25 on the PCV valve, and also the wire that you cleaned on the MAFS is not the MAFS wire. That is the IAT sensor, which is what gets dirty, but to clean the MAFS part of the sensor, you need to spray up into the 'tube', there are two very small wires up there that are the sensor and hot wire for the mass air reading.

I also normally recommend an induction or injection service prior to preforming this, it pretty much makes the engine as good as new. People are generally surprised at how well their truck used to run after all is said and done.

One last note, I'm sure you were careful doing so, but I do not recommend even checking the plug gap, as the Platinum, or Iridium if you choose, is just a coating on the electrodes, and can easily be scratched if care is not taken. My rule of thumb is a visual inspection of the new plug, if the electrode is straight, and not bent down towards the tip, s in it was dropped, it is correct.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks Dave for the corrections and clarifications. I will update the instructions accordingly! :thumb:
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
One last note, I'm sure you were careful doing so, but I do not recommend even checking the plug gap, as the Platinum, or Iridium if you choose, is just a coating on the electrodes, and can easily be scratched if care is not taken. My rule of thumb is a visual inspection of the new plug, if the electrode is straight, and not bent down towards the tip, s in it was dropped, it is correct.
Yes good point. I just wanted to check one of them in each pack as I got sent the wrong plugs once on another vehicle and the way I discovered this was that was the gap was off--somebody must have put the wrong ones back in the box. That's why I used a feeler gauge and not the cheap $0.99 gap tool they sell at the NAPA parts counter.

That said, the OEM LR plugs are gapped properly so anyone using them should not worry about this.
 

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Changing the plugs--cont'd

....LR and every car mfgr in the world will tell you the plugs need to be torqued to a specific #. Take that under advisement. That said, I've probably installed 100 plugs in my life and never used a torque wrench. You develop a feel for this after a while. Using a standard 3/8" drive socket wrench, I put my hand about halfway down the handle and pull almost as hard as I can to seat the plug.

**Note--you will feel a point where the plug starts to get difficult to turn with the wrench. This is the crush washer starting to deform. Continue to tighten (hand halfway down handle) and you will eventually feel a hard stop. This is the point to stop.**
Nice write up. FYI torque specs I have for the plugs are 25Nm / 18ft lbs. everyones strength here may vary ...

I tend to do my plugs around 60-70K. May be a waste of $$, but I feel better about it. I may do the "PVC" too when I do the plugs again, possibly end of the year ..got your notes copied to my maintenance notes on a folder on my PC.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks Frisco. Yes, if you have a torque wrench by all means use it.

I will also bet that LR recommends you disconnect the battery when doing this. I did not.
 

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I install plugs by feel as well. Using a torque wrench is far from an exact science on this engine, as the plugs are deep set into the valve covers, so you need to use an extension and a swivel sometimes. Doing this with a torque wrench, and going strictly by number will leave you under torqued. It is a crush seal on the plug, you feel it start to crush, and go a little further to fully seat it. As long as it is crushed, you're good, there is about a half turn of play that you can get away with and be fine. Just don't go too tight and break the plug or strip the threads.

And yeah, almost every service procedure by the book starts with disconnect the battery... I have found that customers aren't very understanding of resetting all of their radio presets when they get a brake light bulb or wiper blades replaced though.
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Agree with Dave on this re: developing a feel for how tight . Also, most decent, reasonably priced ($80-100) click torque wrenches start at ~15-20 ft-lb. Some start at 10 ft-lb, but even with those you are working at the bottom of the range on the spring.

But if you have one perhaps try it, then try to tighten it by hand to see if you get a bit more of a turn and then maybe do the next one the opposite way (hand first then t/wrench) to see what works best and to get a feel for it.

For the guy trying this for the first time who may not have a t/rench in his tool arsenal, it's not something they really need for this job.

Btw..When I do my next DIY "Porting and polishing the intake manifold and heads for 10 extra hp" the torque wrench will be a necessary tool.`)
 

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Did you feel any difference in how the engine runs now when you are done?
I have a new PVC, MAF and plugs.
Now there is not much left !! :D
How much MPG are you getting?
 

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2006-2009 Range Rover Sport
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Discussion Starter #18
Did you feel any difference in how the engine runs now when you are done?
I have a new PVC, MAF and plugs.
Now there is not much left !! :D
How much MPG are you getting?
Andre,
Thanks for the questions.

Bear in mind, all my vehicles run like finely tuned swiss watches--it's just the degree of "fineness" if you will. To continue with the watch analogy; prior to the tune-up it was running like a Rolex Submariner. A fine everyday watch, what one would might term "pedestrian luxury," but nothing that really elicits ooh's and aah's.

After the tune up, my RRS runs more like a Patek Philippe. It's running so well, I may be handing this car down to my kid someday; you could say I'm just taking care of it for the next generation.
 

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I see you are taking proper care of the car.
Thats the same thing I want to do with mine.
This weeken I will be cleaning the throttle body because it runs so unsmoothly and sometimes it just shuts down. It is not the MAF because I just changed it.
Speaking of watches. I just bought one made by an Icelandic watchmaker.
 

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I see you are taking proper care of the car.
Thats the same thing I want to do with mine.
This weeken I will be cleaning the throttle body because it runs so unsmoothly and sometimes it just shuts down. It is not the MAF because I just changed it.
Speaking of watches. I just bought one made by an Icelandic watchmaker.
post this in the watch thread! lol
 
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