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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all.
Usually I am in the Classic forum, but today I looked at a 1998 P38 4.0 SE
The previous owner said it ran great. Has 130,xxx babied miles and fluids changed regularly.
She moved and the car was towed. She gave it to her friend if her friend would pay to get it from the towing company. She does not know cars in general.
I can purchase this for real cheap if I want it.
Here is what is going on
Plugged in the battery, turned the key.
There was a honking noise under the hood and a beeping noise under the dash.
The readout kept blinking that left window was not set, right window not set, sunroof not set and all the lights were on the dash.
The gas door would not open
Turn the key and got nothing.
She said that the trickle charge had been on, but I do not know if she knows what she is talking about.
I can purchase for the price of the tow fee
Is this something to look at or should it go to the dump?

Thanks all
 

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Assuming the car looks good, then grab it. Sounds like the battery went flat and it may now be in an alarmed state/ immobilised. It will take some fiddling, but you'll get there. Handy to have access to a nanocom. Let us know when you have it and we'll help
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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98 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
That is exactly what it seemed like. An immobilized state. Almost like an alarm state where nothing will work. The windows do go up and down, but that seemed like that was it.
The battery did seem to have a decent charge though. Maybe not enough?
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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450 Posts
use a good battery
first question does the key fob work, replace batterys if required
use hand book in glove box if its their and remarry the key to the car
also look up how to fix window alarms etc., if the book is there that is.
 

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So just a key, but no fob? The two are one unit, so there shd be at least one. There shd be a second too - they're rare and expensive, but your bigger problem will be getting it to permanently remobilise without a functioning one. Someone may hop on with the exact US advice as you may not have an EKA code to worry about, but I would be expecting to pick ithe car up on a flat bed,. Removing the battery is likely to p*** the alarm/ immobiliser off even more, you may need some patience, best to sort at leisure at home
 

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If the previous owner was using the car with only a valet key, then possibly something has been turned off in the BECM. Normally you need a fob remote to turn off the immobiliser. US cars had a generic de-immobilise code for dealers, 1515..."Lock the door. Unlock once. Lock 5 times. Unlock onceqd. You get three attempts, then have to wait 30 minutes, a 'Key-code lockout'.
Your next problem is that '97s and up have passive immobilisation and key-to-computer syncing...a chip in the fob talks to a magnet around the ignition switch...but you dont have a fob! Something is missing in this story...can you get more info about the keys from the owner who was actually driving it?
This bit is important!...Always have the key in your pocket when connecting the battery leads, or attaching jumper cables....the doors will automatically lock you out when you connect.
Second, when using the key in the door lock...two turns to 'lock' within 1.5 seconds will dead-lock the doors, 'Superlocking', a p.i.t.a.
Download the owners handbook for your year, to learn about all the beeping, windows, etc. Run the windows and sunroof fully open and fully closed to reset the anti-trap and stop the beeping.
Here is a way around the immobiliser...remove the driver's door liner. There is a screw under the clip-on tweeter cover. Use a plastic trim pry-bar on the liner studs, or the heads might rip out of the liner. Find the connector in the harness to the latch. Bridge the Blue/red and Green/red wires with a paper clip (back-probe them) and briefly earth this bridge to bare metal. The immobiliser is now off. Quickly try and start the car, or it will auto-immobilise.
Persevere...dont send it to the dump...pass it on.
 

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If the previous owner was using the car with only a valet key, then possibly something has been turned off in the BECM. Normally you need a fob remote to turn off the immobiliser.
Only if it has been locked with the fob. If it was locked with the key it can be unlocked with the key providing the first time it is locked with the key it had previously been unlocked with the fob
US cars had a generic de-immobilise code for dealers, 1515..."Lock the door. Unlock once. Lock 5 times. Unlock once. Lock 5 times. (Pause between each turn, dont rush it). The car should now be mobilised. You get three attempts, then have to wait 30 minutes, a 'Key-code lockout'.
Only is EKA is enabled in the BeCM, if EKA is disabled, the generic 1515 code does nothing.
Your next problem is that '97s and up have passive immobilisation and key-to-computer syncing...a chip in the fob talks to a magnet around the ignition switch.
Passive immobilisation kicks in if you unlock the doors but don't start the engine within 30 seconds. In that case you need to turn the immobiliser off by pressing unlock on the remote or entering the EKA in the door latch. The coil around the ignition switch causes the fob to transmit the unlock code when you put the key in the ignition to save you having to press the button. However, if Immobilisation is set to disabled in the BeCM it doesn't, as many seem to think, turn off the immobiliser, it turns off passive immobilisation so it doesn't matter how long you leave it between unlocking the doors and starting the engine. It also means you don't need a fob.
This bit is important!...Always have the key in your pocket when connecting the battery leads, or attaching jumper cables....the doors will automatically lock you out when you connect.
Whenever the battery is disconnected and reconnected it returns to the state it was in when the battery was disconnected. So if the battery goes flat when the car is locked and immobilised, reconnecting the battery will immediately lock the doors and set the immobiliser. However, if the car is unlocked, unalarmed and not immobilsed when the battery is disconnected it will return to the same state when reconnected. That is why it is possible to change a battery with no ill effects.
Here is a way around the immobiliser...remove the driver's door liner. There is a screw under the clip-on tweeter cover. Use a plastic trim pry-bar on the liner studs, or the heads might rip out of the liner. Find the connector in the harness to the latch. Bridge the Blue/red and Green/red wires with a paper clip (back-probe them) and briefly earth this bridge to bare metal. The immobiliser is now off. Quickly try and start the car, or it will auto-immobilise.
Completely incorrect. All that is doing is simulating unlocking the door with the key which, as long as it was locked with the key, will unlock the doors and turn off the immobiliser. It only works if the key doesn't if either the keyswitch or CDL microswitch in the door latch is faulty, if the car is immobilised because it thinks it is being stolen then it will still be immobilised..
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #9
New info.
Ste states she does not have fob.
She said to unlock it 3 times and it will then mobilize.
I don't own the car yet, so now I would have to go to her friends to work on it.
Does this sound right?
 

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Nothing sounds right about this, but if you want a free p38, then make the trip and try it, or just trailer it home and get further help here, or pass it on to save it. All electrical problems with these p38s can be worked out.
 

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OK Richard ....sentence by sentence responses ...
1...a useful elaboration on my statement, which was 'no fob, claimed to run, therefore immobiliser likely turned off'.
2...NAS spec presumably, thus generic EKA, nothing to lose trying it. No result?...( if correctly entered as advised)...then EKA disabled or faulty latch switch...use Marty's tests. No confusing extraneous info there, I think.
3...Instructive detail on passive immobilisation operation for others (e.g. me) coming across this thread. IF the car was running with no fob, then the immobiliser must be turned off, and OP doesn't have a problem. However, the 'runs after three turns to lock', if true, implies that it is not turned off.
4...Extra detail, as per the book, but I dont have a fob, always use the key, and mine locks when I reconnect. So whatever the previous (unknown) state is...my advice is still "put the keys in your pocket", or possibly pay for a tow, a taxi, and a locksmith.
5..."completely incorrect"...a bit harsh! There is no fob, so the door must have been locked with a key. In your own words, bridging the harness will then unlock the doors and de-immobilise. Worked for me...doors and tailgate unlocked, and the 'immobilised, press remote' message disappeared.
The microswitch functions analysis was posted by John Beall, and tested and confirmed in a youtube video posted by 'Gerbe' in Germany.
All that aside, I did come across an old 2006 post claiming that a 'new' fob could be 'programmed' by '3 presses within 5 seconds of key withdrawal' ...according to an 'OEM manual'...a myth surely? but somehow responsible for the '3 turns to lock' instruction given to Gerk by the original owner? (screenshot attached)
Three presses myth.jpg
 

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1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
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Discussion Starter #12
Looking at the recent threads, it seams like the key thing or FOB thing is very unpopular.(tons of probs)
Can an owner remove any and all of the stupid security problems?
I personally would rather lock and unlock every door by hand rather than deal with lockdown.

I want to purchase this vehicle but I hardly see a light at the end of a tunnel
 

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No you can't, it's integrated with the electronics in the car. If it was possible to remove it, it would defeat the object of having it. All you'd need to do with a stolen car would be remove the immobiliser and alarm. With a GEMS (pre-99) there is a standalone unit that bypasses the normal handshake but it isn't cheap.
 
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