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Discussion Starter #1
This question has no doubt been asked many times, however..
I am after some advice on the following problem. I am looking at two Rangies, 1 being a 1996 HSE (4.6) model with 140K Km's, the other being a 2000 HSE (4.6) model with 200k Kms. The 2000 model has the new manifold. The price difference is $4000Au. I intend to use it a second vehicle (little use) as well as a vehicle to tow my boat (the main driving factor). Is a cheaper with less K's 1996 model a better option than more expensive (relative) higher Km's 2000, particularly noting the vehicle would do less that 10000 per year? I am new to rangies, but am comfortable with using tools and a reasonable mechanical knowledge.
Thanks, Russ
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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The later P38s suffer more with engine problems than the earlier ones, tooling in the manufacturing of the blocks seems to be the cause of this.

I get more of the later P38s in my workshop relating to over heating than the earlier ones.
Later P38s do have abit more power but use more fuel around town, as you will be towing I'd go for the later model but only if you will be doing abit of hill climbing.

Mileage is a issue with any vehicle but it depends on how it's done it and if they were serviced
 

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For the difference in price, I'd go for the '96.
The lower mileage could mean engine and driveline are in better shape.
The higher age might entail some problems (for example old airbags), but with that kinda budget, nothing to worry about.

The 4.6 is a good towcar eitherway, I don't think you'll feel much difference, unless you're really pushing the limits. :wink:

Good luck with your choice!

Filip
 

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Later P38 have less power but more torque
 

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The difference between the two is the 96 uses the GEMS (LUCAS/VALEO) management system and the 2000 uses BOSCH (BMW, when rover got bought out by them). Although the BOSCH engine management system is a little more refined, as viperover stated, they are prone to engine problems. When he means engine problems, he means head gaskets corrode. The engine eventually overheats which causes liner failure and ultimately results in needing the block replaced. I still wonder to this day, if it has nothing to do with the tooling, but rather the fact they used Dexcool instead of the regular green stuff. Don't want to scare anyone with BOSCH rovers, but I am a die hard GEMS man :) .
 
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