Range Rovers Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, i've recently managed to buy a very nice LWB classic that needs a bit of work to get back on the road. I've had it in my dry garage for a few months now and ocasionally running the engine, but the front carpets are still getting wet - in driver and passenger front footwells, worst nearest the middle of the car. I dint really notice it smelling of coolant, but i did notice the dampness was quite hot (after running the car for about 1/2 hour. I'm thinking it must be the heater core leaking but before i tear apart the whole dash, is there anything else i can check? (Also the coolant light was on when i bought it, but went out when i topped up the tank)
Anyone got any thoughts what it might be?
Thanks
 

·
Banned
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
You could try bypassing the heater at the bulkhead and see if it stops but I think you are right and it's the heater matrix. There's nothing else that would give you warm water.....
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Gilbertd.
And is it not possible for engine/gearbox heat to 'warm' moisture around that area when the car is sitting idling?
I'm in a bit of a quandry over what to do now. It looks like a huge job, removing the dash etc. also the landy mechanic who MOT'd it for me (failed on all brake pipes but thats another story...) said i should take all the seats and carpets out, to inspect the floor, but said its ' the cleanest classic he's seen in a very long time'. I'm a bit worried that if i take it apart into so many bits will it ever go back together?
When i take the dash out to change the matrix,should i replace it with a pattern item or is there a better alternative?
Is it worth changing anything else while ita apart (blower motor? Pipes?)
Sorry for so many questions, this is my first classic!
 

·
Registered
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
1,154 Posts
It's a lot of work to get the heater out and hooking up the heater hoses with the motor in place is a big pain - personally I'd blank off the hoses at the motor and wear a jumper. If you are worried about rust you could get underneath it and poke around the footwells with a screwdriver.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maybe i'm still in the 'honeymoon' period of classic ownership but i'm kind of hoping to restore the car to complete working order, so i'd rather get the heater working. I think the car isialmost rust free so might be a good base for a restoration. Might need a thick wooly jumper as everyone round here ( scotland) is speaking about a cold winter!
 

·
Banned
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
I was thinking that too, having just read a weather warning that is saying we're in for the worst winter in 50 years with snow starting by the end of the month in Scotland and gradually moving south by the beginning of December. Yes, getting the heater out isn't exactly easy. Well, that's not strictly true, it's not difficult just time consuming as a lot of other stuff has to come out to get to it. However, if you are doing it in one hit you won't have the same problems as a friend and I have at the moment. He's restoring a '95 LWB, one of the very last ones as far as we can make out, and it needed a lot of work to the bulkhead. So the dash and heater was taken out months ago and trying to remember where everything goes is making it a bit of a nightmare.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That will probably be a softdash model?? mines a 1993 hard dash so maybe not so collectable but it appears to be in pretty good order, with only minimal corrosion. I luckily got to the seat ecu in time to replace the battery so thats all good now. ABS pump was playing up but thats sorted now. I had it MOT' and it failed on about 8 brake pipes. Amazingly the tester reckoned they were all still the original pipes, not bad for a 22 yr old car!! For the heater core, i thought if i'm going to tear it all apart, then getting it back together without delay would be a good plan. I've read elsewhere that i ought to put a new blower motor in too, while i'm at it. Is there any other precautions or bits to change?
Thanks
 

·
Banned
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
It's less work on a hard dash but still pretty lengthy. My '93 had a seized heater blower when I bought it and I bottled out of changing it purely on the grounds that it was my everyday car and I didn't want to get it all in bits and then need to use it. I could get a screwdriver in through one of the vents and turn it but no matter how I couldn't get any spray lube into the right place. With a flick I could get it to turn under it's own power but as soon as it stopped it wouldn't restart without assistance. I toyed with the idea of fitting a couple of 12V computer fans in through the front but never bothered. Once on the move the airflow through the front vent and the heated windscreen did the job reasonably well. May not be worth replacing it, I have a feeling they are no longer available anyway, but while it's out you can at least get some lubricant into the bearings and make sure it spins freely.

As well as the brake pipes, while you are under there, replace the fuel lines too. They are steel and sit between the chassis rail and body so quietly rot away where you can't see them. First you'll know of it is a puddle of petrol on the floor. On mine it was the return that went first so it only leaked when the engine was running. You should have an access plate under the rear seat to get to the fuel pump end and the existing pipes have an olive joint on them which makes them ideal for fitting hose (can't remember if it is 8mm or 10mm ID though) which you can then run right through to the engine bay in the same place as the original steel pipes.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,834 Posts
I;ve never understood the complaints about changing out the heater core. I can do it in a day if I have to but usually make it a weekend project. Remove the dash on day one and start cleaning... everything. It;s a great chance to check electrical connections, fuses and all wiring for dry insulation. Lube up all your pivot points, vacuum out the duct work and scrub and dress every surface. On day two install the blower and core in the heater box and reassemble. It is a stress free, non rushed approach that give a far better finished product. Atlantic British has an excellent write up and a digital camera is always a good idea.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A good idea to clean out the ducts. I tried the blowers on full blast and this resulted in the carpets and my legs getting sprayed with dried leaves!
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
217 Posts
Agreed on using the Atlantic British instructions, but keep in mind there will be some differences with your (presumably) RHD truck. I did this on my '92 due to a failed blower motor, figured since it was all apart I'd replace the heater core at the same time. Not sure how the replacements are these days - back then I tried 2 from different suppliers trying to get one that fit as good as the original. In the end I ended up doing a little hammering on the end caps and I think a little trimming on the heater box to get it all to fit the way I wanted. As others have said, not too difficult, but as I think someone else said - makes you wonder if when they build the car they start with the heater core and then build everything around that!
 

·
Premium Member
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
1,556 Posts
I'd also carefully inspect the floor pan, clean and treat any surface rust. Hopefully, your sills are solid, but you won't really know until you remove the treadplate. If any of the mounting screws appear rusted, you really should inspect this, but be prepared to deal with cancer.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
In the uk there seems to be good availability of pattern heater cores, bearmach and britpart most widely available. Has anyone fitted one of these types? I note they have plastic pipes and i read on another thread that there was maybe a metal pipe option on the market?
So i can now add fuel lines to my job list. The list is growing day by day.
I see also that for the blower replacement, shops are offerering a kit with all sorts of gaskets, solder, cable ties and the like. This project is definately growing 'arms and legs'
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Pl626, when you say treadplate, do you mean the aluminium bar that runs along the door entry and holds the carpet down? - i've removed this and there is a small amount of rust where the screw holes are but nothing too serious
 

·
Banned
1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
Joined
·
3,952 Posts
Avoid Britpart for anything unless you want to be doing the same job again in a couple of years time (if it doesn't leak from the word go). Bearmach is definitely worth spending the extra on.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Bearmach it is then! I think i''ve decided to go ahead and attempt the job, just as soon as i can get the wife's kitchen overhaul finished.
I'm going to get a labelling machine and storage bins to try and keep things organised
Thanks to everyone for all the great input. I feel able to try this job thanks to the great support from you folks.
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
217 Posts
And don't forget a digital camera / phone to take pictures along the way - where wires/cables are routed, etc. Plus you'll want a picture of the interior after you've exploded the entire dash to show off down at the pub (but probably best to wait until you have it all back together before bragging about it!)
 

·
Premium Member
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
1,556 Posts
Pl626, when you say treadplate, do you mean the aluminium bar that runs along the door entry and holds the carpet down? - i've removed this and there is a small amount of rust where the screw holes are but nothing too serious
Yes. Did you peel back the carpet and insulation? Better to take care of any rust issues now, rather than later. The floor is notorious for rusting as the insulation acts as a sponge. Mine was made worse as the footwell had a hole behind the wheel. In the rain, water would come through and get absorbed in the 'sponge' under the carpet, so this is my latest project...
 

·
Registered
1970-1995 Range Rover Classic
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yes, digital camera will go on the list too.
As for the carpets....i've removed the treadplates so i can get under the foam insulation in the front footwells. Also i've removed the carpet in the boot (trunk) and rolled back the insulation there. This revealed a really solid floorright up under the back seats though there is a single strip of rust along parallel with the tailgate about 2 inches in from the tailgate. There are a few spots of rust where the treadplate screws fix but other than that its really solid.
My dilemma is that to actually take all the carpets out, i think i need to remove the centre console and all the seats (and all the wiring/ecu's under the front seats. At that point the interior is basically stripped and i will have parts everywhere. I'm a reasonably confident home mechanic but i don't know if i'm quite that brave! My head tells me it is the proper way to do it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I think we've probably all come across what you've experienced, namely fear of the unknown.

Having been where you are, what I will suggest (with good intent!) is that neither rust nor leaks heal themselves with time. In fact, the opposite; If you spot a problem, it is much easier to sort it now than in a few years, when a small rust patch spreads into a whole panel, or a body mount, etc etc.

Definitely get the front carpets up, you may have to cut the thick rubber sound deadening (don't worry it goes back ok) and have a good look with a torch, and have a gentle tap about. Expect the footwells to be pinholed in the leading corners.

Also worth getting the scuttle panel off to look under there to check the horizontal joint across the scuttle - the seam sealer shrinks. Rub down, reapply seam sealer and then dinitrol to protect it of ok, or, if holed, bad luck - it will need costing up to repair. Almost every mid nineties car I've seen has crust under there, or more likely holes/splits along th sealer.

Anyway, my point is, catch stuff early, and don't be afraid to fix stuff - it was only bolted together by people in the first place, don't forget. Just make sure you have confidence in the limits of your abilities.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top