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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My trusty 2001 4 litre machine has passed the big milestone during the past year and is approaching its service date. The mileage is actually metric I just went to miles for an easy spread, approaching 170k km actually.

I am planning to replace water pump, thermostat, hoses on the service in addition to filters and oil. Last year I did plugs, leads and accessories belt.

Service the transmission, replace diffs and transfer case oils, is also planned.

I have recently got the EAS sorted and running ok.

I am going to replace the shocks as I am sure the are ready to go.

My quick question is any recommend shocks other than oem and any suggestions on anything else that might fail given my mileage I should attend to ?

Thanks to all from down under, and the Hunter Valley for the locals.

Cheers
 

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A little bit of overkill since much of you are doing was called for earlier in it's life or has already failed. You can never judge what is going fail and when. Mileage has nothing to do with it. If there is nothing wrong with your water pump leave it alone. If your hoses look good with no deformity and clamps are not over tightened don't waste the money on an entire hose kit. If your thermostat is functioning, leave it alone. Filters should been inspected frequently through it's life and replaced when needed. and oil is obvious... if it is time for an oil change, change it. If it is not time to change it wait until it is. Tranny, Transfer Case and diffs should have been done at least once by now.

If you are doing all this just for a base line to start over you will be wasting a lot money on things that most likely don't need it.

For shocks, stick with stock or you will change the ride characteristics.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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You may wish to have a good look at the U joints as this is often overlooked by everyone to their later regret!
If you have service records from new, you know what has or has not been done.
Most of your Toorak Tractors did have all of the services done whilst under warranty, so possibly contact a friendly local dealer and have him look up the records if they still exist in their system?
If you are just going to be pootling around locally, then I am fully with TH. Save the $$.
If you are going to cross the Vic or Simpson desert, then change all of it, and carry the old bits as spares
Cheers!
 

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Also a brake fluid flush is often overlooked and should be done every couple years. I get the point about RRToad not fixing what isn't broke. But even good OEM water pumps don't ever seem to clear the 120k mark. My sample size is only 2, but both were in that range and it seems others have similar results. I replaced them when they failed but was lucky neither happened in a remote location.
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for taking the time to comment.

I am actually planning to cross the continent and back around a 10,000 km trip at least, and it is for the avoidance of issues was certainly a significant consideration.

I have sensed from reading here over some time that the pump & thermostat failure rates rise significantly over a certain number of high miles. Maybe I have misread that. My son had a Disco that was randomly popping hoses that looked ok, so I thought they may have some peak life too, noting of course that climate and useage are the key drivers.

The oils filters are due based on previous service records. Thanks for the tip on U joints, I will double check but think they are ok.

Good point on shocks and what I was thinking.

Thanks
 

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1995-2002 Range Rover P38A
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Ahhh.....Since you will be doing a cross country run, I would do a new water pump, T-stat and hoses. Carry all of the old parts as "Good Spares" Don't forget the belt.....
In the last 25 years, I have put about 150k Km on my 85 Classic. Probably 90% off road.....I know where you will be driving, and as there are no services there that will have parts that fit a P-38, You would be prudent to be well prepped.
If you are on bags, I would also carry a spare front and rear. doing the Nullabor on the bump stops would be sheer agony!8-0=
Gotta say, I am jealous...love driving about down there!
We did the 25k Km coastal loop camping last year. Great fun!
 

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I'm with 'if it ain't broke, don't try and fix it'. I would carry a spare waterpump, possibly thermostat and some hoses, as they are easy to replace should they fail. New isn't guaranteed fault-free either, and disturbing the system can lead to other problems.
A full service is of course a good idea. Also check brakes (and the sliders) and wheel bearings. Those aren't easy to change, so I'd sooner replace those preemptively than something like a waterpump. Not cheap though...

Good luck on your trip!

Filip
 

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I can only partly agree, Filip......New is indeed not equal to fault free.
What I have learned from the very experienced Outback travelers I have been privileged to travel all across Australia with is that when prepping a vehicle, you change things like water pumps, hoses, calipers, alternators, etc a while before you depart and give them a good run in.
You then clean, and pack the good used parts and haul them along as when and if you need them, you know for sure they are good to go.
On my first Simpson desert crossing with the Classic Petrol motor, I had a spare electronic ignition module I bought "Just in case"
Turned out I needed it, and it was Dead out of the box.........Fortunately, I also brought the old ignition system on advice of my friends, and was able to finish the trip. The alternative was to abandon the truck in the desert.........
Possibly an bit over the top as a habit, but I have never needed to be towed out of anywhere, whereas I have towed several trucks a long way to get them help.
I suppose if this is a purely highway trip, you could dispense with the extra parts, as there is the possibility of a tow truck on the main roads.......
Oh, I changed my CPS yesterday for a brand new one here......Not broken, and I will keep the old one in the cubby.

SO, I would also recommend changing the CPS as these fail from age and heat.....What time of year are you going?
Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The good old Aussie logic of replacement and taking the known spares was one of my considerations. I am not heading via the Simpson or Beadles track, but nevertheless will be remote from any British expertise or parts.

I am heading off at Easter, back mid May so not a lengthy trip but definitely a long haul. My son lives in Perth so intending 8 days over, 10 days there and 7 back via an alternate route.

CPS was one item I was considering.

My minimum position at present based on sharing of ideas is to purchase all I indicated, definitely service and lube and check the items suggested- then decide if I install or just pack into what space is left. I usually take enough tools to do an engine rebuild anyway!!

If the minimum position is reached early enough, then I will reconsider install.

At times like this I sometimes wish I still had my 74 2 door- but then the P38 is soooo much nicer, albeit complicated.

Cheers
 

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2008 Range Rover L322 HSE
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Another overlooked item is the fuel pump, my 96 lost it 1st pump around the 125,000 mark then replacement unit went last year around 220,000 mile mark. I’m figuring not to bad for almost 18 years of driving it around. Have also replaced crankshaft position senors in both the 2000 and the 96 around the 150,000 mile marks.
 

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I would second the fuel pump if you do not know how old yours is. Mine failed in my 98 with basically no warning. Installing a new one in my 2000 this spring before any long summer drives. They are not easy to come by so at least have a spare.
 

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I completely agree it's a good idea to make sure your car is in very good shape well in advance. And keeping the old parts if they aren't broken. But not just before a trip, as that can potentially create more issues than it solves, especially if there's nothing wrong to begin with. As for spares, in the end you'll be towing a complete car on a trailer, so to be sure you have thought of everything... All that extra weight means more load and wear & tear as well. On our last trip, we cracked the transfer case (caught a rock with the handbrake and tore open the case!). Needless to say we didn't have a spare one in the back, but with the help of a few good friends we managed to source one locally and the next day we were on the road again. :)
 

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Hi,
I tend to agree with the contributor who suggested some of your scheduled maintenance might be exessive.
Aviation is perhaps plagued with overly prescriptive maintenance schedules. An engineer, Mike Bushe has done considerable work on proving that time related maintenance actually adversely affects reliability. He emphasises the importance of understanding the 'bathtub' graph of failure. Basically most parts either fail prematurely or continue to remain operational for a lengthy period, hence the expression bathtub when failure is graphed against time in service.
I don't want to comment on individual items but unless failure of a component will lead to disaster and the part is known to have a limited life, I would not replace any component that was working well
al
 

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Hi,
I don't want to comment on individual items but unless failure of a component will lead to disaster and the part is known to have a limited life, I would not replace any component that was working well
al
https://www.savvyaviation.com/wp-co..._2010-01_reliability-centered-maintenance.pdf
Actually a good read. I've always gone by the idea that if it doesn't explode or leave you at the side of the road, chances are you can leave it alone.


Also is this aussiebushman's alter ego?
 

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Well a fuel pump has Limited life, gives very little warning prior to total failure and will leave you stranded with no readily available replacement if you do not have a spare. Same can probably be said for any vehicle with electric fuel pump but not every vehicle gets driven in the backcountry and has a hard to get pump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well I have stimulated a lot more discussion than I anticipated.

I won’t get into the merits of RCM here, being a professional mechanical engineer and a fellow of the International Society of Engineering Asset Management, I know a thing or two about the subject.

My objective was to confirm if certain components have a finite life, and am I approaching that given the big trip. I think I have confirmed my original ideas, although I am now confident there is quite a spread (over 50,000 miles it seems) in expected life on water system items, so spares rather than replacing may be appropriate.

A question on fuel pump life, those who are supporting replacement seem to be quoting mileage 50% higher than I have, I think. Secondly failures have been noted on GEMS series. Is there any feeling on whether the later style has more or less of lifetime? I note indeed the later type are hard to come by, and they are not easy to change- both good reasons to consider replacement if 100,000 miles (160,000km) is a good run.

Thanks to all for your interest and participation.

Cheers
 

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I've been reading this thread with interest and not a little amusement, I think you and others may be worrying too much. My car has done 368,000 miles, almost 600,000 kms, and is regularly used for 2,000-3,000 mile round trips. In the 163,000 miles I've owned it (bought at 205,000), I haven't had to change the fuel pump so even if it had been changed immediately before I got it, which I very much doubt, and is about to fail at any minute, it's still lasted 63,000 miles longer than you have currently done. Worst case, if it did fail, fit an external pump in the fuel line.

I'm with the if it ain't broke thought but make sure that things ain't broke. People will drive around with odd noises and things that don't quite seem right, that's something that while not being broke is telling you that it will be very soon. A decent service, fluid changes and carry a few spares but don't go overboard. I always carry a starter motor (you can't bump or tow start an auto) and alternator (with no electrics you're not going anywhere) on my long trips. Never had to use either yet but one day I'll be glad I had them.
 

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Other than taking away money and space for beer I don't see the downside of having a spare fuel pump onboard. If you keep the car long enough you will need to replace it at some point. They may be even scarcer at that time. At your mileage I agree it may be a bit early to replace it now.
 

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Re, fuel pump.
probably very wise if traveling into remote areas. It does fit the bill as it gives no warning of failure and incapacitates the vehicle ( unlike shocks etc).
The question is whether to replace or to carry the new item. My pick is to carry the new item rather than replace for the reasons I mentioned previously. If it has run reliably for 100,000km it has a high statistically probably of continuing on for a good deal longer and may be just as reliable as a new item
A very interesting field of study where the axioms 'if it ain't broke don't fix it' and 'a stitch in time saves nine' appear to be in direct conflict with each other. Diagnostic tests such as oil analysis, compression tests and boreascopes may be the best idea where possible. Certainly most doctors would advise non invasive tests and procedures when looking at our internal mechanics ;)
al
 

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Hoses, sorry dont agree here......If you blow a hose its game over for your engine, hoses are cheap if they are 17 years old get new.....water pump, well depends if its had a good coolant inhibitor mix all its life? Again usually not much warning here if it fails.
For sure every fluid and filter.
Wheel bearings Im on my originals at 360,000km
Fuel pump sounds like a good idea, if you are planning a long remote trip, you can always get home in a metro area if it fails, just in low range.
Shocks I like OEM, I have snapped a few Gas/Bilsteins OEM never had a problem.


A little bit of overkill since much of you are doing was called for earlier in it's life or has already failed. You can never judge what is going fail and when. Mileage has nothing to do with it. If there is nothing wrong with your water pump leave it alone. If your hoses look good with no deformity and clamps are not over tightened don't waste the money on an entire hose kit. If your thermostat is functioning, leave it alone. Filters should been inspected frequently through it's life and replaced when needed. and oil is obvious... if it is time for an oil change, change it. If it is not time to change it wait until it is. Tranny, Transfer Case and diffs should have been done at least once by now.

If you are doing all this just for a base line to start over you will be wasting a lot money on things that most likely don't need it.

For shocks, stick with stock or you will change the ride characteristics.
 
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