Coilover Conversion Longevity - Page 3
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Thread: Coilover Conversion Longevity

  1. #31
    FRESHMAN ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    The classics seemed to manage pretty well for over 20 years of production run.

    Re-converting to air may require a lot more than new springs of course, depending on the depth of the conversion. Compressor, lines, valves etc. come to mind.

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  3. #32
    JUNIOR ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    But the Classic was designed to be on coils and also had the Boge self levelling strut on the rear as well as the coil springs. A P38 that has simply had the air springs replaced with coils doesn't have that so is much worse. Virtually all conversions people do just leave everything else in place so with a rebuild kit for the compressor and a set of O rings in teh valve block, you're back up and running.
    96 4.6HSE
    98 4.0 Police spec
    and a number of others I maintain for the owners.

  4. #33
    SENIOR ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard_G View Post
    But the Classic was designed to be on coils and also had the Boge self levelling strut on the rear as well as the coil springs. A P38 that has simply had the air springs replaced with coils doesn't have that so is much worse. Virtually all conversions people do just leave everything else in place so with a rebuild kit for the compressor and a set of O rings in teh valve block, you're back up and running.
    air ride classic did away with boge self level, because air ride took care of levelling in all conditions.
    2k p38 4.6
    95 lwb 4.6
    01 d2 4.0

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  6. #34
    JUNIOR ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    I know, I had a '93 long wheelbase Classic that had originally been on air, so didn't have the Boge unit, but had been converted to coils. Worst of all worlds, inferior to both the air suspension and an original car on coil springs. Put any weight in the back or hitch up a trailer and it sat so low at the back you could barely see over the bonnet, fit stiffer springs and the fillings fell out of your teeth on anything other than billiard table smooth roads. So I bought a P38 purely for the air suspension and realised it is so superior I can't see why anyone would want to ruin a P38 by fitting coil springs, particularly when the EAS system is so cheap and simple to maintain once you understand it.
    96 4.6HSE
    98 4.0 Police spec
    and a number of others I maintain for the owners.

  7. #35
    Banned
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard_G View Post
    I know, I had a '93 long wheelbase Classic that had originally been on air, so didn't have the Boge unit, but had been converted to coils. Worst of all worlds, inferior to both the air suspension and an original car on coil springs. Put any weight in the back or hitch up a trailer and it sat so low at the back you could barely see over the bonnet, fit stiffer springs and the fillings fell out of your teeth on anything other than billiard table smooth roads. So I bought a P38 purely for the air suspension and realised it is so superior I can't see why anyone would want to ruin a P38 by fitting coil springs, particularly when the EAS system is so cheap and simple to maintain once you understand it.
    I'm in the minority on this forum, but coils are simply much, much, much easier to live with for those of us who live in climates where EAS fails A. LOT. Or who aren't purists and have aftermarket racks, bumpers (including swing-outs for spares), tow......and having/do own multiple P38s, the air ride is better. But not at the expense (IMHO) of having constant EAS issues. I own 5 EAS blocks & rebuilding them (after the first one) isn't hard. But takes time. Ditto the pump. Ditto the dessicant. Ditto checking the lines. Ditto the sensors. Ditto the lines.......and when taken into consideration that literally 50% of forum ??? posts are about EAS issues. Yeah enough else goes wrong with these.

  8. #36
    FRESHMAN ROVER wicksw's Avatar
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    I'm gonna rebuild my valve block with fresh vitons just for fun. Rebuilt the fuel distributor on my 911 turbo last year, very similar. Set up in the kitchen or living room, watch three's company or GOT, and get your little tools and some good wine.
    ---
    2001 P38 HSE 45K miles . Los Angeles, CA . old Porsches mostly, old guzzis, a mint old yamaha DT.
    Former LRs: 69 SIIA, D90, Sport SC, L322 SC
    Won the Nevada Trophy in my D90 twice back in the day

  9. #37
    JUNIOR ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by 1996P38 View Post
    much easier to live with for those of us who live in climates where EAS fails A. LOT
    ........and when taken into consideration that literally 50% of forum ??? posts are about EAS issues. Yeah enough else goes wrong with these.
    Not sure how climate can affect the EAS too much, the main components are rubber and plastic so as long as the desiccant is doing it's job and the reservoir is drained periodically, then no water should be able to get into the system to cause any problems in very cold weather.

    The reason why there are so many questions asked about the EAS is due to the lack of knowledge. Someone buys a P38 that sinks to the bumpstops overnight but they think this is normal for a car on air suspension. This will cause the compressor to work harder and wear more so then when it takes too long to build pressure and it hard faults, they decide the EAS is unreliable. Anyone that hasn't done their homework and worked out how it works and what causes it to fail, is going to come to that conclusion. I do many thousand miles in my car and I may be in the minority but I won't put my faith in anything I don't understand. Then when it stops working, I can work out what is happening, what isn't and know how to fix it. Someone that just accepts that it works without knowing how is going to be confused when it doesn't.
    96 4.6HSE
    98 4.0 Police spec
    and a number of others I maintain for the owners.

  10. #38
    SENIOR ROVER Bolt's Avatar
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    Ahhyup!
    That places you solidly into the minority these days!
    I appreciate the sentiment though as I feel the same way about Cricket!
    Refuse to watch it as I cannot understand it, despite lots of beer fueled explanations and actually having played the game
    EAS is really not too tough to work with, however you really need some sort of diagnostic to be able to figure out just what is up when something goes wonky with it. Sensors wear, and things go out of calibration. Like the rest of a P-38, you ignore the small signs, it will bite ya in the backside, after which it will cost ya, or you will send it to "Live on a farm".......
    Now, if one of our Canadian folk could just explain about the "Blue Lines" in Ice Hockey?

  11. #39
    SENIOR ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    to briefly cover responses to last 4 replies, air to coil conversion is as simple as expense and convenience versus the solution to an ongoing failure which has it's roots on poor maintenance and or oversight of wear and tear.
    having been a land rover owner and mechanic from 1998 and retired in 2012, I have experienced the evolution all the way from classics to full size and many of it's variants. as the vehicles aged and wear and tear took it's toll, it's ever growing cost of maintenance was often a deciding factor on the suspension conversion.
    a lack of knowledge and understanding of the air ride often would cause the mechanics to encourage the coil conversion, of course the lack of aftermarket support on diagnostics equipment would further compound the case.
    on this forum we have members from all nooks and crannies of the world where climate changes are extreme and others where climate is quite stable. case in point, I am located in the mid eastern part of the us, next to Washington DC, all year long we see climate changes where temps change as much as 40 degrees F.
    my 2 rangies ride on air but current temps are 50's at night, 80's daytime, this fluctuation causes the small volume of air on the springs to change density and thus send vehicle to the bump stops. summer temps hover on the mid to high 90's, at which time vehicles remain at set height for days at a time, in the winter we hoover in the 30's, during snow we drive on roads covered in de-icing chemical agents draw your conclusions on the toll placed in the under carriage of a vehicle. this is a situation which some members do not experience and can come across as mis information.
    it is my opinion the preference of coils or air ride is not because of purism or minority, but more over cost and up keep of the suspension it self.
    bottom line if you are willing to put up with the eccentricities of one type or the other, it is only as good as the length of time you want to deal with it and its appropriate pros and cons.
    2k p38 4.6
    95 lwb 4.6
    01 d2 4.0

  12. #40
    SOPHOMORE ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard_G View Post
    Not sure how climate can affect the EAS too much, the main components are rubber and plastic so as long as the desiccant is doing it's job and the reservoir is drained periodically, then no water should be able to get into the system to cause any problems in very cold weather.

    The reason why there are so many questions asked about the EAS is due to the lack of knowledge. Someone buys a P38 that sinks to the bumpstops overnight but they think this is normal for a car on air suspension. This will cause the compressor to work harder and wear more so then when it takes too long to build pressure and it hard faults, they decide the EAS is unreliable. Anyone that hasn't done their homework and worked out how it works and what causes it to fail, is going to come to that conclusion. I do many thousand miles in my car and I may be in the minority but I won't put my faith in anything I don't understand. Then when it stops working, I can work out what is happening, what isn't and know how to fix it. Someone that just accepts that it works without knowing how is going to be confused when it doesn't.
    Do you need to drain the reservoir?

    How often? I assume the air dryer?

  13. #41
    JUNIOR ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    If you've never done it, it's worth giving it a go. The Maintenace section of RAVE shows it although the service schedule doesn't mention it.

    Coilover Conversion Longevity-eas-drain.jpg
    96 4.6HSE
    98 4.0 Police spec
    and a number of others I maintain for the owners.

  14. #42
    FRESHMAN ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    Interesting - but what would come out of a plug half way up the reservoir (apart from air), or you need to stick a hose in and suck the water from the bottom (if any) ?
    1998 Defender 50th 4.0L V8 Auto
    1998 Range Rover 50th 4.6L V8 Auto
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    Previously
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  15. #43
    SENIOR ROVER Bolt's Avatar
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    Richard only posted the second page of the service procedure.
    Step 1 on the preceding page reads:
    "Carefully reverse the vehicle up a stout wall until it is as vertical as possible. Care must be taken to ensure vehicle does not fall upon its roof"
    "A winch and overhead beam can also be used if no wall available"


  16. #44
    JUNIOR ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    Odd thing is, the picture shows the drain plug in the middle but if you crawl under your car, you'll find it's at the bottom.......
    96 4.6HSE
    98 4.0 Police spec
    and a number of others I maintain for the owners.

  17. #45
    SOPHOMORE ROVER
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    Re: Coilover Conversion Longevity

    the last time I had my vehicle in that position I needed a winch, on another vehicle to recover me . but I could have opened the bonnet and done that procedure, but fortunately for me a have springs not airbags . this original post asked for longevity on the two systems , the only longevity is in the post and the justification off one over the other(go easy your frightening the animals)its simply your preference over the other ,springs last around 8 to 10 years, air systems last as long as ------ , well you fill in the blanks.

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