EAS Troubleshooting Tips
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Thread: EAS Troubleshooting Tips

  1. #1
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    EAS Troubleshooting Tips

    It seems that most of the EAS help requests I have gotten fall into the same categories, compressor won't run, slow to rise, on the bumpstops every morning (combined with slow to rise sometimes) and "I have no clue, please save me!"

    The easiest place to start is with the compressor operation, and leak testing so I'll start there.

    This post is a work in progress I'm finally getting around to starting, please bear with me, I will edit this message with reqests and updates.

    You can put requests in this thread, or start a new one, I will add as much as I can here.

    You best friends in troubleshooting the system is a tank pressure gage, and the jumper wire procedure, detailed here.

    Dropping to bumpstops overnight, and slow to rise in the morning.

    Try pulling the delay timer (or ECU connector) and see if it drops overnight. If it stays up, then you have the self leveling putting you on the bumps for some reason. If it drops, then you have leaks. Taking longer to come up means you have an empty tank, sometimes the result of self leveling all the way down, or leaks.

    Try that, and see what happens. Slow rising is usually because the comp is running too long because of leaks, trying to fill the tank, and raise the truck all at once.

    If you are on the bumps in the morning, let the engine run with a door open (to inhibit rising) and wait for the compressor to stop running (10 min from a completely empty tank)-good time to listen/look for leaks.

    Then shut the door and "remind" the system what height you want with the rocker switch. It should come up straight away.

    Self Leveling to the bumpstops overnight

    When you get out of your RR, you'll hear the valves tick a little bit to compensate for your weight (the drivers side will sit a little higher without your weight. It should only be afew seconds worth. If it goes for a while, it's hunting-you might have a bad sensor, or just out of wack. a re-calibration should cure that.

    The sensors value can change over time, making the ECU think the wheel is at a different height than it actually is. The ECU also does geometry with the other 3 wheels and compares. If this is out of calibration tolerances on 1 or more corners, it will confuse the ECU, as it tries to get exactly level (I have no idea why) and lowers each corner in succession to make them all level. Round and round it goes untill you're on the bumpstops. For some reason I havn't figured out yet, sitting on the bumpstops can drain you tank...

    If you have a leak('s) in your airsprings or lines, that corner will drop, and the downward sprial begins. Find/fix the leak first.

    Along with the below troubleshooting tips, we now have videos to help you out. Many thanks to member Malafax_dand for producing these helpful videos. Follow this link here for his site.
    http://www.rswsolutions.com
    Last edited by RRToadHall; July 30th, 2012 at 03:28 PM.

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  3. #2
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    The ostrich phenomenon

    Many help requests I get start with "It's been doing XXXX for a while (usually leaking down overnight), and now it's on the bumpstops, with a fault message...."

    Most people don't understand the EAS, because it's not that common, and it works well untill it dies. So like an ostrich, it gets ignored untill the hard fault rears it's ugly head. Don't feel bad, I'm guilty of this too. The $3000 quote from the dealer sent me down this road.

    The EAS does give warning signs of impending failure though: leaking down overnight, audible leaks, compressor constantly running, slow to rise in the morning...etc. These symptoms usually get ignored (because interpretation isn't intuitive) untill it's too late.

    If you have these symptoms do something about it now, before you end up with a hard fault 100 miles from nowhere and have to ride home on the bumpstops with the wife nagging you castrate your dear old friend. If your brakes squeak, you would replace the pads, and have a good look at the rotors, wouldn't you?

  4. #3
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    I've gotten several inquiries of "I had to replace one bag a few months ago, then another 3 weeks later, then a third after a week, now a month later the 4th one is gone. When will this end???"

    If your airsprings are original and one starts to leak, it's time to replace all four. It's easier because you are already dirty, you save on shipping, and you get the piece of mind knowing that you don't have to worry about springs for another 7-10 years. Back to the Brake analogy, if your LF brakes squeak, you would replace the pads on both sides of the axle because if one side is bad, the other is close. Same thing with airsprings, atleast do them in pairs.

  5. #4
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    testing

    After making repairs you need to test the system. The best way I have found is using jumper wires. If it's in hard fault, you need to go to someone with rovacom/autologic/testbook to reset the fault after you've tested it to ensure the problem is fixed.

    Use jumperwires, detailed here, Let your compressor run using pin 8 for about 10 minutes to ensure you have air in your tank. If that does no work, there are other problems-electrical or leaks. You have to have the delay timer installed, and they key in position II to have power to pin 1. After you have it up in the air, leave the ECU disconnected until you get the ECU re-set, or the hard fault will put you back on the bumpstops.

  6. #5
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    to clear the "EAS Fault, slow 35mph max" warning from the dash, put two jumpers on the connector to the ECU. one from pin 7 to pin 18 (ground ) and the other from pin 25 to pin 1 (+12v). When you startup you will get a soft beep and short "EAS manual" message, then normal message center operation will resume.-
    edit.-LEAVE THE ECU DISCONNECTED!!!!!!

    this will work anytime the ECU is disconnected -IE when in hard fault, waiting to get a reset and using manual operation. (or a spring conversion perrish the thought...)

  7. #6
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    brass compressor mount screws

    The brass screws holding the compressor to the EAS box tend to strip out, it is easy to fix.

    Pull the compressor out to give you room to work, get 2 5x40 bolts at the hardware store (not sure of the length, use the old brass to measure, get one a few mm longer). 2 lock nuts and 3 standard nuts to fit.

    put the bolt up through the hole, and thread a standard nut down as far as you can and tighten, they will both sink into the plastic. Put another standard nut and one of the lock nuts on and tighten them together so you can use it to turn the bolt. Turn the whole bolt so that it draws the nut down into the plastic to "sandwich" the case. remove the lock-nuts, do the other side and replace the compressor. A drop of threadlock on the nut in the plastic will help keep it from loosening, or use a lock-nut there too.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDO
    Hi All -

    No... this is not about the French contraceptive, so wipe of those grins. This is about a 1/2 Inch diameter piece of runner and metal that sit below the belly of your EAS Valve Block.

    This piece runs anywhere up to $80 and typically comes in a kit - called the diaphragm kit from Atlantic British. When this thing goes bad, IT WILL cripple your suspension - BELIEVE ME! Amazingly enough, a lot of mechanics out there are not aware of this thing and that it can be changed instead of a whole valve block.

    If you have a slow leak, or suspect something is amiss... consider doing this replacement. If you get the O Ring Kit from the amazing Shupack, then add this to it - especially if your car is long in the tooth, or of mature age.

    I speak from frustrated experience as I got a bad one and just had to do a quick fix to get Betty going again. Horrible things like overheating compressors and EAS fault codes WILL occur when this little puppy goes bad.

    Mike.
    A "frugal" customer reported that a bicycle tire patch (properly applied and glued) worked wonders on his leaky diaphragm, I havnt' tried it but it may get you by in a pinch.

  9. #8
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    Diaphragm testing

    The diaphragm doesn't fail on a regular basis, the easy way to tell is check for air coming out of the exhaust port with the compressor running. unscrew the exhaust muffler and put your finger over the hole to test. if it's good, give a good inspection with the block apart, if it needs replacing you'll have some time to get a new one, it won't require a full second rebuild to swap the diaphragm.

  10. #9
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    non-return valves leaking will cause the front to slowly dance. When stopped the front spring valves open to equalize pressure (I recently learned this from the SID's Jim posted..) if the compressor is running AND the non-return valves leak, compressor discharge will go straight into the front springs. (took me forever to find out why it was only the fronts.)

    once the front height gets enough out of tolerance the ECU will lower the front end, since there's a leak the tank is likely not full so the compressor continues to run, and the cycle continues untill the tank is full, or you get tired of watching it and give up.

    While it's dancing, open a door to inhibit the leveling, the front should continue to rise slowly untill the compressor stops. Then try manually running the compressor (so the 2 front valves don't automatically open) and see if it still raises, it likely won't.

  11. #10
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    Cold Weather

    With cold weather setting in in the northern hemisphere (70% of the population?) leaks are becoming more apparent, we'll see more RR's dropping overnight, and if they've been leaking slowly for a while the will come back up slowly.

    ALL EAS faults fall into the same few categories:

    -leaks
    -leaks
    -worn out compressor (compounded by leaks)
    -electrical issues (rare-ish, and typically aggravated by leaks)
    -and more commonly, leaks.

    If your RR is dropping overnight you have leaks, self leveling will help this, but if your system does not leak, it will not drop, no matter the surface. I proved this by parking Darcy with one wheel on a cinderblock for 3 days. NO movement, yes the ECU was still powered.

    If your RR raises slowly, you have a weak compressor. period. (and leaks, because it shouldn't have to raise up in the morning unless you put it there.)

  12. #11
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    this is an excelent "boil down" of all the EAS info/troubleshooting methods by WPR

    Quote Originally Posted by wpr

    About the compressor: if you have a leak somewhere the compressor has to run overtime. It is normal that it wears faster then.
    But don't panic too soon. We cannot see the inside of your compressor from here. So what you should do is a small test.

    Disconnect the EAS ECU under the lefthand seat. Leave the timer delay in the socket (do not disconnect) and switch on the ignition.
    Now the valves cannot work. Nor will the compressor.
    Have a look at the female connector and try to figure out pin 1. It is easy if you know that pin 6 has no female metal connector plug
    Then start testing step by step

    step 1:
    Put the volt meter on pin 1 (for the red test rod) and pin 16 (the black test rod) You should mesure 12 volts
    step 2:
    put the red test rod on 13 and the black on 18
    If there is 12 volts, move to step 4
    step 3:
    leave the tester where it is (pins 13 and 18 )
    jump between pin 1 and pin 8
    the moment you mesure 12 volts on pins 13 and 18, disconnect the jumper. now your system has 10 bar air pressure (this step should take no more than about 10 minutes)
    step 4:
    make a 3-way split wire and jump connections between pin 1, pin 26 and pin 11
    The left rear should rise
    right rear: 1, 26 and 28
    left front: 1, 26 and 10
    right front: 1, 26 and 27

    All 4 corners should be up.
    If during this test the raising becomes slow: move to step 3 again

    For lowering: same jumpers but replace pin 26 by pin 9

    step5:
    leave the car overnight and the next day have a look what corner it has dropped. Most surely, that bag(s) is (are) leaking.

    Do not connect the EAS computer during the test
    After raising and waiting for the result, of course you can take the key out of the ignition and lock the car.

    If step 3 takes too long (over 15 minutes), there could be a leak in the blocks, the pipe to the tank or the connections at the air drier or the block exit but most common is a worn out compressor. (check the rest first)

    Good luck!!

  13. #12
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    another great addition on the electrical end from WPR

    You will see that there is a way of checking the sensors with an old fashioned ohms-tester (multimeter)

    For a complete test, you should take your ohm tester and check the following on your EAS ECU (35 pins connector) while raising and lowering the corners the whole way with a jack (so you don't go too fast):

    pins 21 and 23 (right front)
    pins 20 and 22 (right rear)
    pins 3 and 5 (left front)
    pins 2 and 4 (left rear)

    For a super complete test, then mesure if all sensors are complete (mesure seperately to see if one of the 0 volts connections of the sensors is not broken). You don't need to raise or lower the car for this:
    pins 24 and 21
    pins 24 and 20
    pins 24 and 3
    pins 24 and 2

  14. #13
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    Can you clarify that procedure for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by shupack
    another great addition on the electrical end from WPR

    You will see that there is a way of checking the sensors with an old fashioned ohms-tester (multimeter)

    For a complete test, you should take your ohm tester and check the following on your EAS ECU (35 pins connector) while raising and lowering the corners the whole way with a jack (so you don't go too fast):

    pins 21 and 23 (right front)
    pins 20 and 22 (right rear)
    pins 3 and 5 (left front)
    pins 2 and 4 (left rear)

    For a super complete test, then measure if all sensors are complete (measure separately to see if one of the 0 volts connections of the sensors is not broken). You don't need to raise or lower the car for this:
    pins 24 and 21
    pins 24 and 20
    pins 24 and 3
    pins 24 and 2
    When you say to raise each corner with a jack, and measure the sensors at the connector, do you mean to put the jack under the chassis and raise that corner of the truck until the tire lifts off the ground? Thats how I read it anyway.

    thanks for the great info. I have myself a Faultmate now so I will be playing with that when I get some time.

    cheers n beers
    Mick
    2002 4.6 HSE Blenhiem Frost Silver,tweaked brakes- slotted DBAs & EBC Greenstuff pads,GenIIIs,Bilsteins-f Pedders-r,Cooper Zeon XSTA tyres, Topgun 8mm Leads & Bosch Platinum+ Plugs,Prodigy Brake Controller,AuxBatt charger,HRA BullBar,RhinoRack

  15. #14
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    Re: Can you clarify that procedure for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rat_RR02
    When you say to raise each corner with a jack, and measure the sensors at the connector, do you mean to put the jack under the chassis and raise that corner of the truck until the tire lifts off the ground? Thats how I read it anyway.
    not exactly, raise the frame to the ride-height you want to set, then read the value on the sensor to re-store via faultmate.

  16. #15
    FRESHMAN ROVER Rat_RR02's Avatar
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    Re: Can you clarify that procedure for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by shupack
    Quote Originally Posted by Rat_RR02
    When you say to raise each corner with a jack, and measure the sensors at the connector, do you mean to put the jack under the chassis and raise that corner of the truck until the tire lifts off the ground? Thats how I read it anyway.
    not exactly, raise the frame to the ride-height you want to set, then read the value on the sensor to re-store via faultmate.
    Hi shupack,

    OK, I got you now, yes, that makes sense.

    I checked my ride height at each corner by measuring the gap between the tire and the wheel arch, they are all the same (within 2 mm) for each ride height setting and I have now saved the settings from the Faultmate so I can go back to them if I need. Also this gap reading is handy to know if you are looking for a slow leak on a corner of the truck.

    cheers
    Mick
    2002 4.6 HSE Blenhiem Frost Silver,tweaked brakes- slotted DBAs & EBC Greenstuff pads,GenIIIs,Bilsteins-f Pedders-r,Cooper Zeon XSTA tyres, Topgun 8mm Leads & Bosch Platinum+ Plugs,Prodigy Brake Controller,AuxBatt charger,HRA BullBar,RhinoRack

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